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Thread: Makita LS1013 Dual Slide Compound 10" Miter Saw Problems

  1. #1

    Makita LS1013 Dual Slide Compound 10" Miter Saw Problems

    Hello, I purchased this Makita saw about a year and half ago. I am constantly squaring the fence. It seems to move every few months. I torque the 4 bolts holding the fence to the saw as much as I dare without stripping the aluminum, but it still manages to move. I checked for burs or anything else that maybe causing it to seat improperly, but eveything seems to be ok. The saw cuts fine when aligned, but it is a pain when I am cutting a bunch of pieces and have to check them constantly to see if they are square. Anyone out there have any problems with this saw? Anyone have any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance,

    Michael

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Winter Springs Fl
    Posts
    195
    Call Makita, they are good at helping with problems.
    Jim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    2,364
    I have been having the EXACT same problem with my LS1214F for the last few months now. A few weeks ago, I would adjust the fence to dead on square, thanks to some tips from the group here. Then, I would make some cuts and miter saw life would be good. In a couple of hours I would go to make a few more cuts and, by magic, the cuts wouldn't be square anymore and neither would the fence. This got sooooo frustrating that I started thinking that my dogs had somehow grown opposable thumbs and were readjusting my saw to trick me. I finally got through that particular project and forgot about the problem, unfortunately.

    Today, while setting the saw up and resquaring it again because, yes, it had creeped off again, I saw that the aluminum under the lock washers had kind of worn a little recess under them, I'm guessing from the tightening and retightening of the bolts. I added a flat washer under the lock washer and some Locktite to the threads. We'll see if this helps. Also, while working on this problem a few weeks ago, I took the fence off and sanded (by hand) the contact surfaces on the fence itself and the mating surfaces on the base. This seemed to help a little as well.

    I have called Makita and they were of ABSOLUTELY no help. The customer service housewife or househusband that I talked to each time could only read to me from their printed script at their desk. From the many ways that I tried to describe the problem, it seemed that they didn't really have a clue what parts I was referring to since they didn't have the saw in front of them and they probably hadn't ever even seen one. This is just my opinion and it's not even a complaint against the CS person. Makita just doesn't seem to provide them with any knowledge of the products that they take calls for other than the CS scripts. Everyone that I talked to at any of the Makita phone numbers that I called were as helpful and friendly as they could be. They just couldn't help me.

    In the end, both times that I talked with them, they did recommend that I call my "local" factory service center. I have three here in Central California, the nearest being 90 minutes away, one way. When I called them and talked to their "best man for these saws" at two different factory service centers, they had never heard of the problem or could they even seem to understand what the problem was. Both men that I talked to repeatedly wanted to tell me how to adjust the saw for vertical squareness. I kept trying to tell them that it was the fence that was moving and that it was the horizontal squareness that I was talking about. But somehow I guess the phone signal kept bouncing of the satellite wrong and got jumbled up somewhere around Jupitor before getting back down to earth and to the service mans phone because they just couldn't understand that the fence would be moving and that I must be talking about some other part of the tool. Each service center recommemded that I bring the saw to them, let them keep it for a few days and they would try to see what the problem was. When I related to them that they were each one and a half and two hours away respectively, they said that I could ship it to them but I would, of course, be responsible for shipping and insurance each way, with no guarentee mind you, that they would be able to fix the problem; Just that they would check it out.

    This isn't a rant against Makita tools. Just that no one seems to be too concerned about this problem. At least it's good (sort of) to know that someone else is experiencing the same problem. Maybe we can find out together what to do.
    Mark Rios

    Anything worth taking seriously is worth making fun of.

    "All roads lead to a terrestrial planet finder telescope"

    We arrive at this moment...by the unswerving punctuality...of chance.

  4. #4
    Mark,

    I have to agree, Makita was no help at all. I tried tighting these with a small pipe on the lug wrench to get a bit more leverage and it still moves. I am wondering if it has something to do with the temp changes in my shop. I do not heat it at night. This is the only aluminum machine that I own. Not sure what I am going to do except maybe square the fence and have it welded in place You sure should not have to do something like that to keep it square. I think next year I will upgrade to a larger cabinet saw and do my cross cutting on it. Anyone interested in purchasing a Makita Mitre saw??

    Michael

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Collin County Texas
    Posts
    2,417
    Michael, consider that the problem may not be in the fence mounting, but rather in the mechanism that that locks the blade at 90, +45, and -45, degrees. I would make a ticky mark on the frame and take an exact measurement from the fence to the mark. The next time it is out of adjustment, check the distance to the mark to see if the fence really has moved, or is the detent mechanism leading you down the primrose path.

    When we had our kitchen cabinets cutom built, the cabinet shop had a specific Milwaukee miter saw that was locked at 90 degrees and never moved from 90 degrees. Something to think about.
    Best Regards, Ken

  6. #6

    Same thing with mine

    I was using it last night and I made a couple of cuts and noticed it out of square. I can offer no help yet - as I have not addressed the problem, but you have someone elsesharing your misery.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    2,364
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Garlock
    Michael, consider that the problem may not be in the fence mounting, but rather in the mechanism that that locks the blade at 90, +45, and -45, degrees. I would make a ticky mark on the frame and take an exact measurement from the fence to the mark. The next time it is out of adjustment, check the distance to the mark to see if the fence really has moved, or is the detent mechanism leading you down the primrose path.

    When we had our kitchen cabinets cutom built, the cabinet shop had a specific Milwaukee miter saw that was locked at 90 degrees and never moved from 90 degrees. Something to think about.

    Ken, on these saws (it looks like the 1013 and the 1214 mount the same), the detents are cast into the base; no movement or adjustments possible. On these saws, you lock the table into the 0 degree detent, lock the table and then adjust the fence. Once the fence is square and you are satisfied with it you adjust the needle/pointer to zero and it's supposed to be hunky-dory. But now, it's neither hunky OR dory.
    Mark Rios

    Anything worth taking seriously is worth making fun of.

    "All roads lead to a terrestrial planet finder telescope"

    We arrive at this moment...by the unswerving punctuality...of chance.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    414
    Michael, I don't have a Makita LS 1013 saw (wish I did), however it sounds possible that the bolts are vibrating loose with use and causing the fence to slip. You may want to try some Loctite on the bolts to hold them in place and see if it solves your problem. Loctite will do the following:

    • <LI class=bullet>Prevent fastener loosening from vibration and thermal cycling <LI class=bullet>Protect threaded assemblies from rusting and galvanic corrosion <LI class=bullet>Use on high strength up to 3/4" fasteners
    • Red
    It is available at many hardware stores, or you can purchase it at Amazon. Here's a picture of the bottle it comes in. They make various types for all different applications. I would recommend this one. Good luck, I'm sure this problem will be overcome.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Be true to your work, your word, and your friend." -Henry David Thoreau

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Collin County Texas
    Posts
    2,417
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rios
    Ken, on these saws (it looks like the 1013 and the 1214 mount the same), the detents are cast into the base; no movement or adjustments possible. On these saws, you lock the table into the 0 degree detent, lock the table and then adjust the fence. Once the fence is square and you are satisfied with it you adjust the needle/pointer to zero and it's supposed to be hunky-dory. But now, it's neither hunky OR dory.
    Mark, I should have noted that I also have the 1013. Mine took a little beating during the move to our new home, and the adjustment handle was twanged, thus bending it a little. I haven't gone into the detent setup, but that was on my list of things to investigate for the same problem you are havng. From my point of view, the angle setting adjustment should be the only way for things to get out of adjustment. It just doesn't seem possible for bolts that are tight would allow the fence to move.

    I haven't looked at my instruction manual in a coons age, I don't know if I can find it, but does it have a parts explosion diagram that might show a weak point in the construction?
    Best Regards, Ken

  10. #10
    Hey guys,

    Do not use the red Locktite!

    Use the blue.

    I have the 1214 and do not have this problem, yet.

    When and if it arises, I will use Blue to rectify it.

    When you bolt anything with the red, it stays bolted forever.

    Please post the final solution to this dillema.

    By the way, I beat the nonsense out of mine,

    Throw it on trucks (It is attached to a rigid SUV)

    Get it to the third story on the drywall lift truck,

    Put it through drastic temp changes.

    And its square day in day out.

    Per
    "all men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night....wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, to make it possible."
    T.E. Lawrence

  11. #11
    I think I may have found the problem. Under the saw there is a bracket which holds the rod in place for the indent stops. It is held in place by 2 screws. After turning the saw upside down and running the table from 45 to 90 I noticed that this bracket was moving slightly. I took it off, there were a couple of burs where it bolted to the saw. I cleaned them up with a file and put the bracket back on using a impact driver to tighten these screws. Now when it hits 90 it is dead, no slop at all. The 2 screws were not very tight to begin with. Not sure if this was the problem, but the saw is squared up again and will keep an eye on it.

    Thanks for the help!!!

    Michael

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