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Thread: Question about a saw

  1. #1
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    Question about a saw

    I have this combination saw by Disston & Son. What is the correct name for this saw? How many are there out there? Anyone actually use one? And value? (I am having a clear out of unused tools).

    One side is around 14 tpi (I have not counted the teeth) and could be used for dovetailing. The other side has teeth around 11 tpi and could be used for tenons.

    The handle has lost the lower horn, so do not be confused by this. The way it works is that the plate is loosened by undoing a lever, sliding it out, flipping it over, and returning it to the handle.





    Here cutting with the fine teeth (they are reasonably sharp, but could do with a touch up).



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  2. #2
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    Eric Brown ( on this site) would be the one to talk to about this saw...

    I do have the Bishop No.10 version...
    Tool cabinet door, upper left.jpg
    That I leave set up for Dovetails..
    Last edited by steven c newman; 05-19-2024 at 8:31 AM. Reason: wrong saw name
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  3. #3
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    It looks very much like a Bishop #10.

    Bishop Saw.jpg

    It is good for cutting dovetails.

    Cutting the Hearts.jpg

    The back can be set for depth of cut to make things a little easier.

    Mine has one set of teeth filed rip and the others for crosscut.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
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    Typically the coarse teeth are filed rip and the fine ones crosscut. Loosening up the screw at the toe and removing the handle will allow the back to be repositioned so it can act as a depth stop. Looks like a crack is starting on the handle between the two bolts on the right side. This is a common area of concern. Yours looks like the 12 version, which is preferable for dovetails. The longer version is easier to use when cutting sliding dovetails and slots. (Remove waste with chisel and router plane).
    Typically here in the USA this saw would be worth in the $50 to $75 range.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    It looks very much like a Bishop #10.

    The back can be set for depth of cut to make things a little easier.

    Mine has one set of teeth filed rip and the others for crosscut.

    jtk

    Jim this one works differently - the depth of cut cannot be set.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Eric Brown ( on this site) would be the one to talk to about this saw...

    I do have the Bishop No.10 version...
    Tool cabinet door, upper left.jpg
    That I leave set up for Dovetails..

    Thanks again Steven. The Bishop has a nicer handle than the Disston.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Brown View Post
    Typically the coarse teeth are filed rip and the fine ones crosscut. Loosening up the screw at the toe and removing the handle will allow the back to be repositioned so it can act as a depth stop. Looks like a crack is starting on the handle between the two bolts on the right side. This is a common area of concern. Yours looks like the 12 version, which is preferable for dovetails. The longer version is easier to use when cutting sliding dovetails and slots. (Remove waste with chisel and router plane).
    Typically here in the USA this saw would be worth in the $50 to $75 range.
    Thanks Eric. This is a #14 (faint etch).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Jim this one works differently - the depth of cut cannot be set.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    This looks just like a Bishop I used to own. I'm surprised the depth of cut can't be changed. That's the point of the design. I will say that my Bishop had teeth on the end of the plate opposite the handle. These assisted in positioning the plate relative to the clamp bar to set the depth of cut. The handle end is held securely when the thumbscrew is tightened.

    IMG_0839.jpg

    Edit: From the "Disstonian" Website. It confirms cutting depth is adjustable.

    Screen Shot 2024-05-19 at 9.00.53 AM.jpg
    Last edited by Rob Luter; 05-19-2024 at 9:05 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    This looks just like a Bishop I used to own. I'm surprised the depth of cut can't be changed. That's the point of the design. I will say that my Bishop had teeth on the end of the plate opposite the handle. These assisted in positioning the plate relative to the clamp bar to set the depth of cut. The handle end is held securely when the thumbscrew is tightened.

    IMG_0839.jpg

    Edit: From the "Disstonian" Website. It confirms cutting depth is adjustable.

    Screen Shot 2024-05-19 at 9.00.53 AM.jpg
    Bishop had "teeth" on the end of the blade they called a rack. Not sharpened. These teeth engage the back and keep that end from moving up and down when in use. The handle end relied on the clamping pressure. Disston worked around this patent by replacing the rack with a thumbscrew, in effect, clamping the blade at both ends. The Bishop is cleaner, but the Disston works just as well.

  10. #10
    Derek, I think you'll find that with a little deeper inspection and a little controlled persuasion, that the blade does indeed move. It may have simply been in the current position for many decades.
    Disston No 14.jpg
    Last edited by Edward Weber; 05-19-2024 at 12:27 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weber View Post
    Derek, I think you'll find that with a little deeper inspection and a little controlled persuasion, that the blade does indeed move. It may have simply been in the current position for many decades.
    It may also be the second screw in the handle is a replacement. On the Bishop saw the second screw is just a stud to keep the back from wiggling up and down. On Derek's example it may actually be holding the back in place.

    For some reason the second screw on the handle is like the slitter on a Stanley #45 - often missing.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    It may also be the second screw in the handle is a replacement. On the Bishop saw the second screw is just a stud to keep the back from wiggling up and down. On Derek's example it may actually be holding the back in place.

    For some reason the second screw on the handle is like the slitter on a Stanley #45 - often missing.

    jtk
    Jim, on the Disston the second screw is more like a standard saw split nut. Two piece. Not meant to clamp. Derek should be able to remove the handle, loosen the thumbscrew at the toe, and slide the blade out.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Brown View Post
    Jim, on the Disston the second screw is more like a standard saw split nut. Two piece. Not meant to clamp. Derek should be able to remove the handle, loosen the thumbscrew at the toe, and slide the blade out.
    Thanks for the clarity on that detail Eric.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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