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Thread: Stanley Bailey #7 Made in England plane

  1. #1
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    Stanley Bailey #7 Made in England plane

    I was at an estate sale today and they had this Stanley Bailey #7 Made in England plane. From what I can tell the Made in England plans are not considered as good as the Made in USA planes. This plane doesn't appear to have ever been used. It has a corrugated sole. It is also missing the plane iron and chip breaker. It had a price sticker on it that looks like it was from when it was bought of $39.00 . What would a plane like this be worth or should I not even consider it. They have it marked for $100, but from other purchases I think they would be willing to consider less.
    IMG_8400.jpg IMG_8401.jpg

  2. #2
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    An iron and chipbreaker will cost you upwards of $50. The plane is useless as it is. I'd offer them $30.

  3. #3
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    Considering how much it is going to cost for a blade and chip breaker you might want to pass on this one if they won't come down significantly on the price.

    My preference is for the much earlier planes, but that's just me.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    I wouldn't be surprised that if you asked on Craigslist, someone would give you one. Lots of those on shelves collecting dust.

  5. #5
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    It may turn out to be a great plane. Before all else, place a straight edge along the sole - flattening a long plane is not for the inexperienced.

    If it looks good, try the blade before you replace it.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  6. #6
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    Someone gave me a Stanley #4, Made in England. It was a piece of junk that I converted into a scrub plane. It’s now serviceable. Complete pre-war Stanley #7s are plentiful in the $150 range, even the sweet spot Types 10-13.

  7. #7
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    By contrast Stephen, I have a UK-made #3, and it is a good plane. I have had a UK-made #4 1/2, and it was excellent. I had a Oz-made #7 - reputedly less good than scraping with finger nails - and it was a beauty! I sold the #4 1/2 and #7 because I had too many planes. Shoulda kept the #7.

    UK-made planes are variable. Some excellent, and sone boat anchors. Worth a look.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  8. #8
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    My English No. 4c..
    English No.4, top view.jpg
    Has been used quite a bit...
    English No. 4, groovy sole.jpg
    Has a groovy sole, too..
    English No. 4, Made in England.jpg
    A simple little fact: Stanley found out IF a plane was made/assembled in England..they did not have to pay the Import Taxes..and then could sell anywhere in the Commonwealth...
    English No.4, Bailey.jpg
    But is still was a "Bailey"...not Rumpole of the Bailey...
    English No. 4, grinding angle, factory.jpg
    Iron says it was made in England..and gives the precise Grinding angle of 25 degrees...stamped right on it..
    English No. 4, side view.jpg
    Mainly been used to plane raised panels, ala Paul Sellers...and works quite well...which is all I ask of any tool I have.

    BTW: it was never used as a shooting plane...they did make other planes designed to do that job.
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  9. #9
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    ...not Rumpole of the Bailey...

    I'm impressed Steven .

    Regards from Pomeroys Bar and Grill

    Derek

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post

    UK-made planes are variable. Some excellent, and sone boat anchors. Worth a look.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Worth a look? Without the chip breaker and blade? For $100? As Rafael and Jim already mentioned, I wouldn’t consider it unless the seller came down - way down, and even then…

    It would be silly of me to argue that all Made in England Stanleys are junk. I have a #79 (from the 60s judging by the box) that is excellent. Maybe pre-war Stanleys aren’t as plentiful Down Under. But unless he wants only a corrugated version, in the States it shouldn’t take more than a few weeks to find a good one. Not recommending an eBay purchase, but there are currently dozens available there. On the other hand, I wouldn’t hesitate buying one from Patrick Leach - he probably has a few gathering dust right now. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if the OP could get one from a fellow Creeker if he posts a WTB ad in the classifieds. Our own James Spangler has been known to find and work his magic with special requests.
    Last edited by Stephen Rosenthal; 04-26-2024 at 1:13 PM. Reason: Typos

  11. #11
    A Hock blade and chip breaker would be a worthy upgrade for that plane. So I wouldn't say no to it, since those are things I would probably want to replace anyway.

    However, I'd want to get into it for a lot cheaper than that. A UK made plane, even with all of the parts, would be a tough swallow for me at $100. You could get a US made plane for about that if you live in the US. At that price, it'll require some de-rusting and work. But I bet that plane is gonna require as much work, or maybe more, to get it really tuned up.

    I'd offer $50, and if they balk, show them it's missing parts and will cost you $100 just to get it working. If they want more than that, I'd just walk and wish them luck.

  12. #12
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    Thanks to everyone for their thoughts. I think I will pass on the plane but will take another look at it tomorrow if it is still there but will be much more informed from all your comments. Thank You for sharing your input.
    Bob V.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Vavricka View Post
    Thanks to everyone for their thoughts. I think I will pass on the plane but will take another look at it tomorrow if it is still there but will be much more informed from all your comments. Thank You for sharing your input.
    Bob V.
    The longer it sits the more it means no one else wanted to meet the price or even make an offer.

    The longer it sits, the more likely someone might be to take a lowball price.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
    My question is what is it going to cost you if you wish to buy a #7 that is ready to go. How long are you willing to wait to get a #7? And at what is the cost you are willing pay? From experience, Stanley planes made in England are usually a very good planes. My guess is that they don't have a clue and that since it is not complete, they will take less. At $50 it is a steel. At $75 you are still in good shape, Even if you purchase a hock iron and chip braker you still have a #7 for around $150 and where are you going to get a good #7 for $150? Any plane will work it the blade is sharp and at the $150 mark you will have the top of the line blade.
    Tom

  15. #15
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    Tom makes some great points.

    For me every plane purchase was a balance of the price tag, how much the seller might budge, how much work and/or cost of parts were going to go into putting it in good working order.

    A few times this thought process also considered the value of the individual parts if they had to be sold separately to make back my money if the plane was a junker.

    Turning a sow's ear into a silk purse may not always be possible, but sometimes you can come close or put a good deal of cash back into your purse.

    One of my experiences with this was a #5 plane that looked like a piece of junk on ebay. I wanted it for the low style knob and tote. Turned out the pictures were terrible and the plane was actually a pretty good buy for less than a blade set was getting on ebay at the time (less than $17 iirc). That plane is still in my shop and is one of my go to jack planes.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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