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Thread: Micro-Adjustable Stop Block - Shop Made

  1. #1
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    Micro-Adjustable Stop Block - Shop Made

    I was watching paint dry for a while this afternoon so I knocked this one off the to-do list. Mill some scrap true, route a couple of MatchFit dovetail grooves, drill some holes, cut the block into two parts, and add some hardware.

    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (5).jpg
    It assembles like so.
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (6).jpg
    Clamp the assembly in the approximate positions you want via the right side.
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (7).jpg
    The screw knob moves the adjustable block 1/32" per rotation.
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (8).jpg
    Once adjusted to your liking, clamp the other side of the assembly . . .
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (9).jpg
    . . . and cut your parts.
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


    Samuel Butler

  2. #2
    Cool project.

  3. #3
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    Now that is an interesting and useful design.

  4. #4
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    Micro-adjust anything is very satisfying. Thanks for sharing.

  5. #5
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    Very clever, and good thinking on the fine thread. Thanks for sharing.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    ........... some hardware.

    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (5).jpg
    It assembles like so. The screw knob moves the adjustable block 1/32" per rotation.
    Glenn - I have thought of doing something like the but in a different application. However, I've never figured out what the bits and pieces are to allow the knurled nob to freewheel while the threaded rod is engaged in the t-nut on the 2d block.

    Could you - or anyone - 'splain this to me so can get the parts to replicate?

    OR - have the threaded rod attached to the 2d block so that it freewheels, and the rod moves in and out of the first block?

    Thanks
    When I started woodworking, I didn't know squat. I have progressed in 30 years - now I do know squat.

  7. #7
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    I like it, what size bolt/thread pitch did you use for the adjuster?

  8. #8
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    Thanks everyone.

    @ChrisA Edwards - I used a 10-32 threaded rod so that one revolution would be about 1/32".

    @Kent A Bathurst - Here's some pics that may help. The threaded knob and nut jam into each other like a normal double-nutting function to lock the nuts in position.
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (10).jpg
    The nylon lock nut holds itself in position. This position is such that the threaded rod spins freely but is not sloppy.
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (11).jpg
    The t-nut just provides the threads so that the spinning threaded rod causes the moveable block to move in and out when the rod is spun.
    Micro-Adj-Stop-Block-v2 (12).jpg
    I would have preferred a threaded insert but did not have that size. I had the t-nut so a bit of epoxy and it's all set. The outer rods are just solid stock that I wax a bit. These just act like guide bars to keep things from twisting during adjustment. Your requirement may or may not need this. For a heavier load you could use a heavier rod, drill the rod and slip in a cotter pin and washer instead of replying on the threaded components to hold.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 11-16-2023 at 6:48 PM.
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


    Samuel Butler

  9. #9
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    Excellent description, Glenn. Thanks

    One of those "how did I not figure it out?" topics, which is great - straightforward, no sneaky bits.

    The closeup photos did the trick -jam nut with knurled brass, and the nylon nut as a rotating stop

    Turns out I have all the needed components in a couple different thread configs.

    Regards
    Last edited by Kent A Bathurst; 11-17-2023 at 9:48 AM.
    When I started woodworking, I didn't know squat. I have progressed in 30 years - now I do know squat.

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