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Thread: Trimming a Piece of Drywall

  1. #1
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    Trimming a Piece of Drywall

    I need to trim 1 1/4" off two sides of the drywall panel that is the door to the attic area. I did not like how it was done when the house was built so I trimmed out the opening which made the opening 1 1/4" smaller (5/8" on each of the four sides). I thought I would just put in a new piece of 1/2" drywall which I had but came to the idealization the ceiling is 5/8 drywall. I know for a fact the walls are all 1/2" except the garage wall that is shared with the house which I believe has to be 5/8 to meet fire code.

    I would like to use the 5/8 that was the door but am not certain how to trim 1 1/4 off two sides. The score and snap method for small trims like this has never worked for me.

    Suggestions??

    Thanks
    George

    Making sawdust regularly, occasionally a project is completed.

  2. #2
    Sheet rock saw. They are cheap and they'll do what you want.
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  3. #3
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    I have one of those but the edge produced is kind of ragged not crisp and clean. I am thinking about using a oscillating tool.
    George

    Making sawdust regularly, occasionally a project is completed.

  4. #4
    Got a rotozip? That work well too.
    Lasers : Trotec Speedy 300 75W, Trotec Speedy 300 80W, Galvo Fiber Laser 20W
    Printers : Mimaki UJF-6042 UV Flatbed Printer , HP Designjet L26500 61" Wide Format Latex Printer, Summa S140-T 48" Vinyl Plotter
    Router : ShopBot 48" x 96" CNC Router Rotary Engravers : (2) Xenetech XOT 16 x 25 Rotary Engravers

    Real name Steve but that name was taken on the forum. Used Middle name. Call me Steve or Scott, doesn't matter.

  5. #5
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    Use your utility knife. After the initial score cut make a few additional freehand cuts going deeper each time, should only take 2 to 3 additional passes. Make sure to remove the gyp buildup from the blade after each pass.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill McNiel View Post
    Use your utility knife. After the initial score cut make a few additional freehand cuts going deeper each time, should only take 2 to 3 additional passes. Make sure to remove the gyp buildup from the blade after each pass.
    +1 on this method

  7. #7
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    Use your utility knife. After the initial score cut make a few additional freehand cuts going deeper each time, should only take 2 to 3 additional passes. Make sure to remove the gyp buildup from the blade after each pass.
    +2 - works like a champ.

    Just make sure you use a good straight edge, make light passes (don't bear down hard on the knife), keep the knife as close to 90* as you can & use a new sharp blade.

    4 or 5 passes and you should be good to go.

    If you need some pieces I have a ton of cutoffs you're welcome to practice on. It's 1/2", but, it will work fine for practice.
    "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." - John Lennon

  8. #8
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    Just score both sides, it will pop right off.

    But an oscillating tool will give you a cleaner edge.

  9. #9
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    Track Saw.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by George Bokros View Post
    I have one of those but the edge produced is kind of ragged not crisp and clean. I am thinking about using a oscillating tool.

    Yes, an oscillating tool with a "half moon" shaped diamond blade work really well. - As long as you can lay down a guide 2X4. I use the Bosch OSC312DG. Love it.


    I wouldn't use a tracksaw, because the saw itself is not meant to be exposed to that kind of dust. It might damage the motor or bearings.
    Last edited by Allan Speers; 10-06-2015 at 4:46 AM.

  11. #11
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    I have a drywall stripper tool that I have used all the time to take off small amounts of drywall

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Speers View Post
    I wouldn't use a tracksaw, because the saw itself is not meant to be exposed to that kind of dust. It might damage the motor or bearings.
    Ya think Allan? The smiley face usually means it was a joke. 😉

    A utility blade would be my suggestion like above. An oscillating tool is going to generate a lot of dust by comparison and will take longer. It's drywall, so the cut doesn't have to be perfect. How are the edges finished? Do they slip into a track or something?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    . How are the edges finished? Do they slip into a track or something?
    It just sits on a piece of door stop nailed around the edge of the opening.
    George

    Making sawdust regularly, occasionally a project is completed.

  14. #14
    Just score both sides 2 or 3 times and it will snap right off.
    Any kind of rough rasp will smooth the edges.
    Use a new blade and it will work fine.

    My house has one made of plywood you might want to consider that.

    Good luck.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    My house has one made of plywood you might want to consider that.

    Good luck.
    I could use plywood or the 1/2 drywall I have a spare piece of but am wondering why they used 5/8 for the existing panel. I was thinking it was perhaps for fire code?
    George

    Making sawdust regularly, occasionally a project is completed.

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