Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 39 of 39

Thread: Marquetry tutorial (finished w/lots of pics!)

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Plano, TX
    Posts
    2,032
    Dewey, thanks for taking the time and sharing your skill with us, this is an excellent tutorial.
    The means by which an end is reached must exemplify the value of the end itself.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Coral Springs Fl.
    Posts
    40
    Great looking work. Thanks for the tutorial

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    520
    Thanks, Dewey. Your tutorial is very clear and helpful.

    An alternative to clearing the spaces for the fans would be to cut them with a forester bit at an earlier stage of construction, then fitting the fans to the recesses. Would that be problematic, or more time-consuming? (I've not done any marquetry, but would like to.)

    Also, you could cut the outer bands with a circle cutter (or could use a forester bit for the inside radius). You'd have to sandwich the veneer between two boards to keep it intact, and you'd no doubt have to make two 360s to get four 90+s, but you could two at a time. Again, you'd have to fit the fans to the rings. Opinion?

    I would be interested in a tutorial on string inlay. One variant is to use dyed epoxy rather than wood for the inlays. I saw that in a Fine Woodworking issue quite some time ago. If you've tried that perhaps you could include a few words on that technique.

    Cary

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Stanwood, WA
    Posts
    3,059
    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Swoveland View Post

    An alternative to clearing the spaces for the fans would be to cut them with a forester bit at an earlier stage of construction, then fitting the fans to the recesses. Would that be problematic, or more time-consuming? (I've not done any marquetry, but would like to.)
    That is certainly an idea, however I have never seen or heard of it done. I suppose with the right setup it would work great for bulk work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Swoveland View Post
    Also, you could cut the outer bands with a circle cutter (or could use a forester bit for the inside radius). You'd have to sandwich the veneer between two boards to keep it intact, and you'd no doubt have to make two 360s to get four 90+s, but you could two at a time. Again, you'd have to fit the fans to the rings. Opinion?
    I think this one would be tougher than you might think. If you could get the center point of the cutter directly over the tips of the fan you could cut the ring but it you were just a bit off you would either damage the tips or have an imperfect circle. The imperfect circle will show your mistakes when you try to combine the fans to make a half circle or full circle... still I am not saying it couldn't be done. Your idea doing this in reverse by making a 360 and then breaking it up might work if you were careful and accurate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Swoveland View Post
    I would be interested in a tutorial on string inlay. One variant is to use dyed epoxy rather than wood for the inlays. I saw that in a Fine Woodworking issue quite some time ago. If you've tried that perhaps you could include a few words on that technique.
    I have done this before and I have used other materials such as Turquoise for example. The epoxy works fine as long as you use the right kind (not 5 min) and let it fully cure... otherwise it gums up and ruins the inlay. I may create another tutorial for inlay next (after the Morris Chair is done). It is real simple. The stringing that you see on federal furniture somewhat falls into this category but the curves are far more advanced than strait lines as you might imagine. The Master of Federal stringing is IMHO Steve Latta and he produced an outstanding video for Lie Nielson to hype up the new string and berry tools he created for them. If you ever want to try and tackle a federal piece or a true Pennsylvania spice chest you will want to see this video and consider the tool purchases as well.

    For all,
    Please post here or PM me and tell me what you are interested in seeing for the inlay tutorial and I will take your ideas and try to incorporate them for the next in the series.
    Dewey

    "Everything is better with Inlay or Marquetry!"


  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    4,988
    Blog Entries
    1
    WOW Dewey. I'm going to have to study this closely. You know how I like the veneers. I'd love to do some work like that on one of my boxes. How about more pics of the finished project? Looks great.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  6. #36
    I'd like to add a few comments, if I may. I don't do much inlay but I do veneer work and have made a number of sand shaded fans.

    My comments:

    I make a template for the 22.5* cut. Actually, I have these templates for making sunburst veneer projects and one of them is 22.5*. I have some instructions for making them here. And a companion excel spreadsheet here. Or you can go to my web site and find the pointers to the articles.

    I do the sand shading before I cut the pieces for the sand shaded fan. Couple of reasons: It's difficult to control the shading - I like more shading towards the large part of the fan than where the points are. So after I do the sand shading, I trim the shaded edge to give me that taper in the shading. Additionally, it's really easy to burn the point off if you do the shading after cutting the triangle. Finally, the heat changes the size of the veneer piece slightly so you'll get a better fit if you cut to size after doing the sand shading.

    Lastly, I prefer making the gouge cuts with a bit more curved gouge - I just think the fan looks more dramatic with more scalloped cuts.

    Attached are a couple of pictures of a piece I'm working on right now. You're seeing the glue side of the piece. It looks a bit like a pin cushion because the veneer is bent. I just cut the fan into the field veneer by taping the fan in place and cutting through the fan and the field in one cut with the gouge (I used a #8 gouge here). For "difficult" veneers, like this bubinga (or a burl), I put veneer tape on the show side of the field before cutting to prevent splitting and breakage of the field veneer.

    Mike
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Stanwood, WA
    Posts
    3,059
    Thanks for the post Mike. You might remember that I commented on an earlier thread of yours. I had an idea you would have something to contribute here.

    Your pics will certainly help others realize the potential of geometric marquetry.
    Dewey

    "Everything is better with Inlay or Marquetry!"


  8. #38
    Is that a particular type of sand, or will any fine sand work?

    Roman

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Stanwood, WA
    Posts
    3,059
    Pure white sand is what I used. I picked it up at Michaels for $3.99
    You can see it in the right of the pic with the hot plate in the background.
    Dewey

    "Everything is better with Inlay or Marquetry!"


Similar Threads

  1. Shop Built Slot Mortiser finished (PICS)
    By Guy Kowalski in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 12-15-2007, 7:30 PM
  2. Finally finished the kitchen (pics)
    By John Preston in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-14-2003, 11:33 AM
  3. finished hollow bowl (pics)
    By Bill Esposito in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-13-2003, 11:18 AM
  4. Bookcase finished!! Pics
    By Roger Myers in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-15-2003, 1:49 PM
  5. Forth Plane finished: Spokeshave (Pics)
    By Rolf Schmid in forum Neanderthal Haven
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-26-2003, 8:09 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •