Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Entertainment Center

  1. #1

    Entertainment Center

    I finally got aroung to getting some Digital Shots of a few of my recent projects. I built this Entertainment Center around Christmas 2001. I designed it just like the LOML wanted, and it has served it's purpose well. The upper storage cabinet holds Music and Movie CD's, and our Family Videos. The Lower storage section has 2 adjustable shelves and has our Stereo, CD, DVD, & Home Theatre Electronics. Oh yes, the Playstation 2 and games.............I almost forgot the most important thing in there!
    Basically a Face Frame Cabinet, all Oak & Oak Plywood. Stained with the old reliable Minwax Golden Oak, and Satin Polycrylic top coat. It weighs a bit, but it is as solid as Sears!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Kevin Gerstenecker; 03-09-2003 at 8:12 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Neoga, IL
    Posts
    338

    Very nice, Kevin

    Looks like a very nice project that is also quite functional.

    How do you like the polycrylic? We started using it a couple of years ago. It may be my imagination, but it seems to me that we have much less problems with runs and brush marks than we did with their oil based product. We also like the reduced odor and the ability to clean up with water.
    JB

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Leesville, SC
    Posts
    2,220
    Kevin,

    Nice looking cabinet. Thanks for sharing the picture with us.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4

    Thanks Jim!

    I appreciate the kind words Jim, thank you! I have been using the Minwax Polycrylic for selected projects for a couple of years now. You are correct, it is much more forgiving for runs and brush marks than it's solvent based companion. I like the low odor, and easy cleanup as well. When it first came out, I applied 3 coats to an interior Oak Threshold I made for a friend. I was curious to see how it would hold up. Everytime I visit their home, I am down on my hands and knees inspecting the threshold. It is between the hallway and kitchen, and seperates the carpet/tile transition. I am amazed that is has held up very well in this high traffic location, but it shows little to no wear. Another thing I like about it is that it tacks off so quickly, that your project has very little time to pick up dust. I find that recoating in 2 hours or so, as the label states, is not always the case depending on temp. and humidity. If it hasn't dried sufficiently to recoat, it will ball up a little under your sandpaper, but other than than, I really like the product. Somewhat costly, but I find the results are worth it. In other words..........."I be Likin' it!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    4,299
    Kevin, if you like the Minwax Polycrylic, go to Sherwin-Williams and try the Wood Classics Waterborne Polyurethane. It's a little pricey, but it is VERY user-friendly. Typically, two brushcoats is adequate with a light sanding between coats with a drywall sanding block(sponge-type), unless you pre-raise the grain.

    Jason

    (no affiliation with S-W, just spent gobs o' dinero there)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    2,123

    Very Functional

    Kevin -

    Looks like it has served it purpose well - and will continue to for years to come. Nice piece. Thanks for showing us. Anything else to see?

    Well Done!
    Ted

  7. #7
    Looks good, Kevin. LOML is wanting me to do the same for an inset area we have the tv shoved in. Guess it's time to to something for her. Otherwise, she may start a $10 tool sale while I'm not home.
    Every deed plants a seed.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Neoga, IL
    Posts
    338

    Polycrylic

    Kevin, Have you ever tried spraying the Polycrylic?
    JB

  9. #9

    Spraying Polycrylic

    Jim, I have sprayed the Minwax Polycrylic, from the spray can it is available in and a HVLP Gun. It sprays OK, but nothing to get excited about. Believe it or don't, I had better luck using the Spray Can than the Gun. It looks like "Heck" right after it is sprayed, but it lays down nice, and gives about the same dry finish as using a bristle or foam brush. You really have to shake the can first.....the label says 2 minutes, and they mean it! It also is better if it is agitated often during the application. It goes on wet and thick if your spray pass is too slow, or the nozzle is too close to the work, but the end result, for me anyway, has been good. I haven't tried spraying a large, flat surface, or a entire project. I use it mostly on small areas, and spindles, Gallery Rail, and the like. Could be better, but with a little practice, and getting used to the spray pattern, and application speed, it works good. Hope this helps................

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Southeast Houston Area
    Posts
    256
    Great Job Kevin! The best way to put nice furniture in your home is to make it yourself. One of the nicest HEC's I've seen. Well executed.

    Jim Izat
    The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne.

    Geoffrey Chaucer

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •