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Thread: Hanging clamps on wall

  1. #1
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    Hanging clamps on wall

    I see a lot of pictures of people hanging clamps on walls with homemade clamp rack type things. I am planning to do the same but was wondering if anyone had a link or information on specifics about this so I don't have to reinvent everything. My space is limited in every direction (even coming away from the wall) so I need an efficient design.

    Can I use 1x pine against the wall and then just screw in blocks to it, or should I use 2x material for strength, or should I cut the whole thing from one piece? Anyone have different designs for pipe clamps vs. F clamps vs. hand grip clamps etc. Any specifics on this stuff would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I don't have my design completed yet but here is the plan.

    I have some closet rods made from wood, about 1 1/4 " or more dowels. I was going to create a ladder like assembly that you could hand them on. Several dowels at different heights so support multiple levels of clamps.

    Does that make sense?

  3. #3
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    That could work Steve, but would sometimes be a little slow for removing and hanging. Pipe clamps, for example, wouldn't hang on that unless you clamped them down on the dowels to hold them on because of the pipe hitting the lower rungs. Other clamps might dangle around a bit.

    It's a simple enough design to build though, and allows some flexibility for expansion since you are not tied to a specific type of clamp.

  4. #4
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    Here's what I did...my only wish is that I would have left another inch between the clamps
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    IMHO, most clamp racks I see in magazines are over-engineered.

    I have a 1x6 wood spanning a few open stud bays in a wall and it stores any clamp (C, pipe, bar, quickclamp) with ease. Plenty stable, easy to reach for, economizes space. I don't even lock my clamps down on the 1x6. I just hang them.

    If you have open stud bays, I'd do that.

    If your wall is finished, I'd just tack 1x spacers in the studs and put a 1x6 across them. For smaller clamps, run narrower stock.

    If you really want to economize the space, u cn build a recessed cabinet by removing the space between two of yr studs, trimming out the opening and then running a horiz 1x in the bay. This'll keep em from protruding too much.

    Gotta admit, nothing looks as cool in the shop as a well organized clamp rack...

    The real benefit of the clamp rack systems I see in the mags is that they let you stack clamps deep. Not good for me bkz a) my rack's along a hall so it can't protrude, b) I don't have that many clamps; 32" wall space holds em all.
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 02-06-2008 at 10:43 AM.

  6. #6
    While most on here have very high quality rack systems, like in the post above, I was in a hurry one day trying to finish my shop (still trying lol) and just took a nice looking 2X4 and screwed it into the wall up high...My clamps just hang from it...I plan on redoing it when I get more time, but it works great, is free if you have some scrap 2X4's and is really fast to get your clamps off the table...

  7. #7
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    Thanks a lot for the closeups, that helps a lot.

    I do have finished walls and like the simplicity of the 1x strips and spacers. I will probably do that in some spots, but in others I would like to stack them out from the wall 2 or 3 deep to save space.

    Greg, why would you prefer to have another 1" between clamps? Is it difficult to hang them?

  8. #8
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    You know, the more I think about it, the spacers and strips idea sounds like a great start. I can easily do that and figure out something else if I run out of room...

    edit: nevermind, I just checked and my big Jet clamps won't hold on that little clearance (they fall off). Still thinking.
    Last edited by Peter Quadarella; 02-06-2008 at 10:59 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Quadarella View Post
    Thanks a lot for the closeups, that helps a lot.

    I do have finished walls and like the simplicity of the 1x strips and spacers. I will probably do that in some spots, but in others I would like to stack them out from the wall 2 or 3 deep to save space.

    Greg, why would you prefer to have another 1" between clamps? Is it difficult to hang them?
    Yeah, it would make these meat hooks I have for hands grab them easier. It would just make it a little quicker to grab and put back I think.

  10. #10
    Um...what about 2x spacers?

    You could also hang 5" L brackets or 6" 75cent shelf brackets from BORG and seat a 1x4 or 1x6 as a 'shelf'. Clamp yr clamps on that. Do it high enough and it'll seat yr Jet's properly without being a head-banging hazard. No?

    That'll get them off the bench.

    As phase 2, you can cut slots in the shelf the width of each clamp bar. The clamps would then slide in and the jaws would run parallel to the wall instead of perpendicular. You'd lose horizontal hanging space, but wd be able to stack.
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 02-06-2008 at 11:33 AM.

  11. #11
    I have one set of racks for handscrew-style clamps, and another for parallel-jaw, "F" style and pipe clamps.

    The handscrew racks are made from two 2x4's hung vertically and flat against the wall with four short hunks of 2x4's mortised into the vertical pieces, secured with some yellow glue and deck screws through the back. Each holds 3-4 clamps depending on the size.

    The other racks are a simple frame made from a simple frame of 1x3 poplar with an additional strip of 1x3 inside the frame at the top and bottom both as reinforcement against racking and for mounting to the wall. The frames are screwed together with #6 x 1 1/4" coarse-thread drywall screws. I cut notches of the appropriate depth and width in the top and bottom rails for the various clamps - about 3/8" for the parallel-jaws, 5/16" for the "F" style, and 3/4" or so for the pipe clamps. All clamps have their "backs" against the wall. The jaws of the parallel-jaw clamps actually sit on top of the top rail. Only the top jaw of the "F" styles and the pipe clamps are on top of the top rail.

    One rack is about 24" tall for parallel-jaws and "F"s up to 24", and another is 8" for the smaller clamps.

    Each rack takes about an hour to construct with most of the time spent cutting the notches prior to assembly.

    I'll post pictures this evening if I get a chance.
    --Steve--
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  12. #12
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    Great info. The Jet's are 6" deep so need at least 4-5" of space to the wall. I can see that if I go the full 6", I can keep a uniform depth and hang 3 pipe clamps in that depth. I could do triangle 3/4" ply (since I have a bunch of scrap) for the L brackets and hang shelves with the notches like Steve describes (more scrap ply).

    Good stuff. The Irwin grip clamps are best hung on something sticking straight out from the wall I think. Maybe something like the ones on the left in Greg's picture would work, I'm not sure.

    OK, maybe I've fallen into the over engineering category now . That's ok, it's fun.

  13. #13
    Here is the set up I used in my old garage because of the open stud work. This will not work in my new garage so I think I am going to use a cleat mounting system.

    ClampWall1.JPGClampWall2.JPG
    Grant
    GO Buckeyes!

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Quadarella View Post
    The Jet's are 6" deep so need at least 4-5" of space to the wall.
    Only if your rack has them facing the wall - if you turn 'em around with the rail against the wall, most of everything fits within 3", you just have the "heads" sticking out at the top.
    --Steve--
    Support The Creek - click here

  15. #15
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    You're right it does. That would work, but I'd still need to cut notches in that case because of the bar getting in the way. But I can use less material that way.

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