View Poll Results: Corded or Cordless?

Voters
23. You may not vote on this poll
  • Corded: For your situation, this should suffice and convenient.

    12 52.17%
  • Corded: No replacement for power, convenience isn't a big deal if you're at home.

    11 47.83%
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: corded vs. cordless? your vote = my purchase...(Long)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    83

    corded vs. cordless? your vote = my purchase...(Long)

    NOTE: POLL is CORDLESS for FIRST option.

    I put out a thread a couple days ago asking if people still use their corded tools but let me give you situation and maybe you can help me out.

    BACKGROUND: I purchased the Ridgid 8 piece kit for $270 and planned on keeping it. Then I thought why go half way when you should either go full blown corded or cordless but more powerful like Ridgid's 24volt lithium. I sold the individual tools on ebay for $400 net (not including shipping). I kept the circular saw because it was suitable for the 24volt battery. I plan on buying the TS3650 in the next month or two.

    PROBLEM: I can't choose between going full power corded or cordless. I'm just a occasional DIY and tool addict. I want to get something that I shouldn't have to get again.

    CORDLESS CHOICES: Tools of the Trade review of Lithium tools say Ridgid's 24volt line is solid. Not as good as more expensive V28 milwaukee's or 36v bosch and so forth but Ridgid is at about 1/2 the cost and performs nearly as good. My estimate for the cost for the Ridgid = $401.92 out the door for the Hammer drill, 2 batteries, charger, Recip saw, Jig saw. Again, I already got the circular saw. I will sell the circular saw for about $50 if I go corded.

    CORDED CHOICES: Makita 4351FCT $163 or Bosch 1591 $158 for Jig saw. Leaning towards the Makita for LED and being different. Great ratings on Amazon for the prior 4341FCT. Recip saw choices are: Hitachi CR13BY $120 on sale or Milwaukee 6523-21 $159. Circular saws are Makita 5007MG $139 or Milwaukee 6390-20 $129. So the total can be anywhere from $407 to $461.

    FOR CORDLESS: I will be having the TS for big rips so I figure the power of the cordless circular should suffice for small jobs. The convenience of no cord is very appealing. I don't use it everyday, 8hrs/day. I was affraid of replacing batteries, thats why I'm going with Ridgid.

    FOR CORDED: Brutal power. No batteries to worry about.

    Please throw in your 2 cents. I'm REALLY on the fence on this one. Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Deuce Lee; 02-06-2008 at 12:09 PM. Reason: clarify poll options

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    83
    NOTE: The first option should say CORDLESS, not corded twice. Sorry.

  3. #3
    IMHO, the single most important tools I own are 2 cordless drills. I'd get an 18v LiIon full set w/2 batteries and then buy a 2nd tool body on ebay when you get some xtra $$. You'll prefer the convenience of cordless here.

    I don't see the benefit to a cordless circ saw. Especially if you have a tsaw, the csaw will be used infrequently, and with large sheet goods. Bkz of dust and space, y'll probably end up cutting all sheets in the same place, so as long as there's an outlet there, you won't need cordless.

    Everything else is a toss up. I like cordless recip saws bkz they're used in weird positions and on ladders.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    83
    those are some good points Shawn...

    well, tools of the trade says the new lithium tools, especially the higher voltage ones have made circular saws alot better then they use to be, and again, ofcourse it's still not close to the cord but it's better then before, and it's just for occasional sawing, in case i need to take it outside quickly for stuff...

    yeah i already got the 1.5Ah ridgid compact drill, nice, light and powerfull, 460 in lb of torque, and if i add the 24volt set, that comes with a heavier drill that puts out 610 in lb of torque...

    i'm just considering the corded power because they are just brutal tough compared to the cordless tools, but again, since i'm going to be having the TS, i'm thinking i can get away with the cordless to compliment it

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    1,850
    Corded v. cordless strikes me as being dependent on a lot of factors -- How much time do you spend where there is no outlet? How much is sheer power a factor? While battery powered tools have a convenience factor in maneuverability, where does that come into play for you and how important is that?

    I've got an 18v Lion Makita kit, but--in retrospect--probably should have just bought the drill and driver. I tried to help demo a deck w/the cordless recip saw, but it ran out of juice pretty quick. When I reach for a circ saw, I'm reaching for my TS55 or Dewalt. Doesn't have battery jigsaw, but I've never smacked myself on the head and said "Darn, wish my Bosch was battery powered."

    Really comes down to where and how you use your tools.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Fallbrook, California
    Posts
    3,562
    Deuce, both of your poll choices say corded so I can't figure out which one to mark.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce Lee View Post
    ...
    PROBLEM: I can't choose between going full power corded or cordless. I'm just a occasional DIY and tool addict. I want to get something that I shouldn't have to get again....
    FOR CORDLESS: I will be having the TS for big rips so I figure the power of the cordless circular should suffice for small jobs. The convenience of no cord is very appealing. I don't use it everyday, 8hrs/day. I was affraid of replacing batteries, thats why I'm going with Ridgid.

    FOR CORDED: Brutal power. No batteries to worry about.

    Please throw in your 2 cents. I'm REALLY on the fence on this one. Thanks in advance.
    Interesting post--

    Cordless tools seem to be getting a lot better. They have one problem, however, for the occasional DIYer IMHO - batteries need to be charged. I can't count the number of times I've reached for one of my cordless tools only to find that the battery was dead. Yes, I even have two batteries for each of them, but it's not safe to leave them in the charger. People who constantly use their cordless tools don't have this problem because they are using the batteries that have been recently charged.
    Last edited by Don Bullock; 02-06-2008 at 10:39 AM.
    Don Bullock
    Woebgon Bassets
    AKC Championss

    The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.
    -- Edward John Phelps

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,056
    Another thing to consider is cost. The cordless tend to be more expensive. Before I got serious about woodworking, I went out and bought a whole bunch of cordless tools. I even have a cordless compound miter saw. I use them all and think they are great.

    However, in retrospect, some of the items were more expensive than their corded counterparts with little gain. It's handy being able to carry that miter saw around with no cord, but I don't really need it to have no cord. Same with my circular saw. I like having a cordless jigsaw because of the curves, and the reciprocating saw tends to get carried around a bit so cordless is nice. Drill - cordless is the way to go IMO.

    If I were to do it all over, I would use my current rule and only buy tools as I needed them for a specific reason. Then I would evaluate each individual tool for cordless or not. I would probably get a cordless drill from a line that I liked so that if I decided to go cordless with another tool I could stay with the same set.

    I have 3 batteries so batteries are never an issue. I always leave 2 in the charger and have for 3 years now with no issue.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Bullock View Post
    Cordless tools seem to be getting a lot better. They have one problem, however, for the occasional DIYer IMHO - batteries need to be charged. I can't count the number of times I've reached for one of my cordless tools only to find that the battery was dead. Yes, I even have two batteries for each of them, but it's not safe to leave them in the charger. People who constantly use their cordless tools don't have this problem because they are using the batteries that have been recently charged.
    This is one of the main reasons that an occasional DIYer should only buy lithium ion batteries. They don't drain nearly as fast when left unused. You should be able to pick up a battery 6 months after a charge and still have full power.

    Another note.. 24 volt cordless tools are very heavy.. I would not suggest buying them as primary tools.

    Eric

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    83
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Haycraft View Post
    This is one of the main reasons that an occasional DIYer should only buy lithium ion batteries. They don't drain nearly as fast when left unused. You should be able to pick up a battery 6 months after a charge and still have full power.

    Another note.. 24 volt cordless tools are very heavy.. I would not suggest buying them as primary tools.

    Eric
    Don, like i mentioned, that was an error on my part, the first Option should be CORDLESS, not both being corded...

    Eric, I'm thinking of going 24volt because of the power, when the circular saw, or jig saw is being worked, it's sitting on some wood, thus weight isn't as big of a factor, it probably makes the tool more stable...

    the recip saw uses 2 hands, thus helps with the weight issue, again, I have Ridgid's compact lithium drill already, 4lbs flat or so, 460 in lbs, does the job for everyday lifting, the 24volt hammer drill with 610 in lbs of torque is 6.7 lbs, and would be used for more heavy duty drilling, so basically i'm trying to get the best of both words with the cordless...and yes, i'm following your logic for the DIYer for lithium...

    man choices like this sucks, a part of me already wants to jump into the cordless side, but a part of me is holding me back saying go for corded because i'm going to be using it around the house most of the time...

  10. #10
    Take a serious look at the situation.

    Where will you use it?
    -Around the house & yard? - Corded
    -At a site or cabin you're building - cordless
    Drill / Drivers - Cordless as others have said.
    Circular Saw - Cord unless you're building in the wilderness
    Reciprocating Saw - I can understand cordless here, but would definitely want one with a cord also. Requires too much power.
    Hammer Drill - (ie masonry drilling) cord for power.

    For a drill/driver I would also have a lighter version 12v or so. I have a hitachi that I'm very happy with. It drills pocket holes and all the other stuff I need.

    One of the things I noticed about all these 'cordless' sets was that I was shelling out a lot of $$$ for a bunch of tools I might only use once a year. I was paying a premium for cordless without the power and it was for around the house and yard.

    I don't have experience with the new 24v/28v lines that are out there. I can say that I have an old 18v drill. When I bought the new Hitachi 12v, it was lighter, charged the battery in 15 minutes or so and came with a spare. That was a vast improvement for me and I've been very happy with it.
    May all your turnings be smooth,

    Brodie Brickey

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,056
    The lighter drills are really nice to have. I have an 18v hammer drill (drills through my brick walls with not much problem) but I usually reach for my 14.4v if it is nearby because of the weight. The 18v is fine and I use it a lot, it just has more weight and power than I usually need and it's great to have a lighter alternative.

  12. #12
    When it comes to hammer drills/drivers I have used the Ridgid ones you're looking at and I can't say anything but great things about them. Lithium Ion batteries last and are lightweight. As long as you have a couple of batteries ready to go, cordless drills are the best. I wouldn't rely on the hammer drill's battery if I was putting holes in concrete all day, but for limited, "nice to know its there" moments, don't worry about it. I keep hearing about the improvements in saws but I just don't think you can beat a corded saw. That being said, I DO have a cordless circ saw that I have primarily for cutting sheet goods down to workable size when I don't want/can't drag the corded worm drive. If that's all you're really looking to do with it, I'd keep the circ saw. If you're doing a lot of cutting elsewhere, a corded saw is a better saw for the money. As far as jigsaws go, I would find one with a cord. I have used some NiCad cordless jigs and I HATED it. They are always losing power when you need it. I'm sure Lithium ones are a little better but the power and reliability of a something with a cord is comforting. As far as a recip saw, plumbers and electricians I know love their cordless ones because they're convenient and they aren't using it nonstop. Some people prune trees with their cordless ones. If I demo a kitchen however, I look for something with a cord and an extension cord. It really depends on use. I continue to debate this same topic with myself everytime I look at a new tool. Good luck!

  13. #13
    I have a bunch of cordless (drill, recip, circular saw, jig saw).. I think other than drivers/drills and maybe recip saws, I would only go corded.. New batteries are way too much $$ and the tool ends up being heavier. I, however, never do any work where I don't have power available.. Might be a different story if you're working out of the back of a truck.


    I wish I didn't have to drop money into new batteries for old tools.. be nicer to drop that money into more tools or new replacements.

  14. #14
    The liIon batts make the 18v drivers pretty light. My bro-in-law has a Makita LiIon 18v and it's lighter than my 14.4 NiMh.

    If yr getting a tsaw and putting this much thought into it, y'll be using yr tools more than you anticipate. I know I do. I leave my batteries capped and recharged after each 'major' use. They haven't failed me yet. In the worse case, you have to wait 15mins for a recharge.

    That being said, there are times a corded can't be beat: drilling pocket holes and high rpm apps like drilling bradpt holes. Post to this thread in 1 year. I'll bet you'll have bought BOTH a cordless and a corded.

    Off topic: One thing I wouldn't invest in is a hammer drill (corded or otherwise). It's too specialized. The only thing it's good for is drilling small holes in concrete. Depending on yr app, concrete work can require either a hammer drill, a rotary hammer, or a chipping hammer. They all have merits and are all expensive (not to mention the specialized bits you'd need). I'd RENT these when the time comes.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,056
    A lot of 18v cordless drills are also hammer drills. My Bosch is - it's just an extra setting on the drill and a detachable handle (usually leave it detached).

Similar Threads

  1. Bosch Jigsaws: Corded vs. Cordless
    By Jameel Abraham in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-06-2008, 7:48 PM
  2. In the market for a new cordless drill
    By Jon Eckels in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 08-27-2006, 12:11 PM
  3. Vote Please - Ridgid X2 18V or 14.4V Cordless Drill?
    By Paul Thompson in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-05-2005, 8:48 PM
  4. Power tools in Europe (long)
    By Christian Aufreiter in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-12-2003, 7:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •