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Thread: This is how I plan on wiring my garage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Seattle, WA
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    Thumbs up This is how I plan on wiring my garage

    In preparation for my first table saw and in order to initiate my garage's transformation into a proper shop space, I need to do a little work. Task #1 involves electrical. Here is what I am going to do:


    * 60-100A subpanel w/60A main breaker fed by 6/3 copper wire
    from my 200A main panel with subpanel's common ground hooked
    up at main panel
    * 2 30A 220V outlets, each on a separate breaker using 10/3 Romex
    * 2 20A circuits for various outlets using 12/2 Romex, separate breakers
    each
    * 1-2 15A lighting circuits using 14/2 Romex

    I'll have to run the 6/3 wiring through a trench about 4 feet long, as well as along an exterior wall. In this case, should I run single stranded wire (3 #6 and 1 #8-10) through grey conduit?

    Thoughts and comments appreciated! Don't hesitate to label me captain obvious either.

    Take care,

    JT
    Last edited by JT Chrstianson; 02-05-2008 at 5:00 PM. Reason: content
    Yeah, I misspelled my last name when I registered

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    New Hampshire
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    2,571
    Only 4 outlets for equipment? Let me think...a table saw, Jointer, Planer, dust collector, drill press, ROS, Jig Saw, belt sander, drum sander, Drill, Battery Charger. Oops, Now that I typed this. I see 2 220V outlets and 2 120V circuits. How many outlets are you going to put on one 120V circuit? You may want another another 120V circuit (or two).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Saint Helens, OR
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    2,463
    Whatever the number of outlets you think you'll want, you'll need double that number. When it comes to outlets, your wants will almost always be less than your needs.

    I placed my outlets at 52" above the floor so that sheet goods, benches and so on did not block them.

    I ran four circuits for my outlets. Double ganged boxes with two 20a outlets (one grey, one white) in each box on separate circuits. If you're on a concrete floor, make sure your outlets are GFCI protected. Putting a GFCI outlet at the first box provides GFCI protection for remaining outlets downstream of it.

    One 20 amp circuit for overhead lighting. Three eight foot fluorescent fixtures on separate switches so that I can have any number of them on.

    One dedicated outlet for air compressor. One 240v circuit for overhead drops to TS.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    For my sub-panel they used what appears to be a coated armour cable as you can see in the photo. I think the grey conduit was just used to go through the concrete. The armour cable was probably OK in the trenches. The sub-panel was between 50-100 ft from the main panel.

    Greg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Whitesell View Post
    Only 4 outlets for equipment? Let me think...a table saw, Jointer, Planer, dust collector, drill press, ROS, Jig Saw, belt sander, drum sander, Drill, Battery Charger. Oops, Now that I typed this. I see 2 220V outlets and 2 120V circuits. How many outlets are you going to put on one 120V circuit? You may want another another 120V circuit (or two).
    I was thinking of about 4-6 outlets per 120V circuit and I could add in a third or a fourth but my garage is pretty small, about 11'x23' or so. All great suggestions everyone! I really like the idea of installing a 240V outlet above the TS.
    Last edited by JT Chrstianson; 02-05-2008 at 5:24 PM.
    Yeah, I misspelled my last name when I registered

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    South Windsor, CT
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    Quote Originally Posted by JT Chrstianson View Post
    In preparation for my first table saw and in order to initiate my garage's transformation into a proper shop space, I need to do a little work. Task #1 involves electrical. Here is what I am going to do:


    * 60-100A subpanel w/60A main breaker fed by 6/3 copper wire
    from my 200A main panel with subpanel's common ground hooked
    up at main panel
    * 2 30A 220V outlets, each on a separate breaker using 10/3 Romex
    * 2 20A circuits for various outlets using 12/2 Romex, separate breakers
    each
    * 1-2 15A lighting circuits using 14/2 Romex

    I'll have to run the 6/3 wiring through a trench about 4 feet long, as well as along an exterior wall. In this case, should I run single stranded wire (3 #6 and 1 #8-10) through grey conduit?

    Thoughts and comments appreciated! Don't hesitate to label me captain obvious either.

    Take care,

    JT
    If you have a really anal inspector who gets fussy about the definition of a "multioutlet branch circuit supplying receptacles for cord-and-plug-connected portable loads", they may not let you run a 60 amp circuit on UF cable. Personally, I'd run the conduit and pull conductors.

  7. #7
    In general it looks very similar to what I did.

    It doesn't matter what breaker size you use in the subpanel, but you neglected to mention what breaker size you were using to feed it in the main panel. You may only be able to get 50A or 55A depending on feeder wire type, insulation temp rating, etc.

    You may want more 220V circuits depending on how many large tools you think you'll have. Table saw, jointer, planer, compressor, bandsaw, lathe... This next bit is somewhat controversial but unless you're considering tools with 5HP motors I think 30A is probably overkill. (If you're planning on a large compressor, a 20" planer, a 4.5HP MiniMax bandsaw, or a clearvue cyclone then of course you'll need 30A or higher circuits.)

    You might think about adding some more circuits for 120V outlets. I used multiple circuits that "leapfrog" each other along the walls so that any adjacent outlets are on different circuits. I have a total of 14 dual receptacles for 120V in my 2-car garage. Makes it easy to plug things in.

    Use at least 2 lighting circuits so that if one of them goes you don't lose all your lights.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Russell View Post
    Personally, I'd run the conduit and pull conductors.
    That's what I was thinking as well. And if I'd been thinking straight, I would have used the same wording you did!
    Yeah, I misspelled my last name when I registered

  9. #9
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Friesen View Post
    It doesn't matter what breaker size you use in the subpanel, but you neglected to mention what breaker size you were using to feed it in the main panel. You may only be able to get 50A or 55A depending on feeder wire type, insulation temp rating, etc.
    Hmm... Maybe I should take a picture of my main box and post it here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Friesen View Post
    You may want more 220V circuits depending on how many large tools you think you'll have. Table saw, jointer, planer, compressor, bandsaw, lathe...
    I suppose I could just run a set of 240V outlets at regular intervals along the wall in addition to one or two on the ceiling.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Friesen View Post
    This next bit is somewhat controversial but unless you're considering tools with 5HP motors I think 30A is probably overkill. (If you're planning on a large compressor, a 20" planer, a 4.5HP MiniMax bandsaw, or a clearvue cyclone then of course you'll need 30A or higher circuits.)
    Agreed. However, I think that if I ever did pick up one of the above mentioned items, I wouldn't have to think twice about plugging one of them in to a 30A outlet.
    Yeah, I misspelled my last name when I registered

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