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Thread: Logitech vs. Bose Noise Cancelling headphones

  1. #1
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    Logitech vs. Bose Noise Cancelling headphones

    These are my very un-scientific first impressions of the new inexpensive Logitech noise cancelling headphones vs. the Bose Quiet Comfort II
    In most cases the Logitech’s were nearly as good as my Bose. I give the Bose a slight nod with the higher pitch noise like the TS with blade raised, dust collector, and router.
    I couldn’t tell any appreciable difference between the two in the lower pitched machines like my WoodMaster, air compressor, and heater.
    The Bose were a little more comfortable but required a little fidgeting to get there. The Logitech’s fit over the ear very easily.
    Musically, I liked the crisp, clean sound of the Bose better. The Logitech’s have a little too much bass for my listening pleasure but overall, still sound very good.

    Value wise, the $49.99 Logitech are the clear winner over the $299.00 Bose.

    I will be saving my Bose for the airplane and whenever I just want to kick back and listen to music. For shopwork and yardwork, the Logitech’s are the clear winner.

    YMMV


    $49.99 Logitech: http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-98040...0963947&sr=8-1

    299.00 Bose: http://www.amazon.com/QuietComfort%C...0963891&sr=8-2

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  2. #2
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    Thanks, Bruce...I'm considering a pair of the Logitech for my shop just to insure I don't mess up my QCII headphones that I couldn't live without on those long, international flights.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the review Bruce. How well do those fold up for travel? I sure don't need a lot more space and weight in my backpack when I'm travelling, but the Bose ear buds I just bought are going back because they aren't very comfortable on a long flight, plus they don't isolate the noise any better than what I had before.


  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Meiser View Post
    Thanks for the review Bruce. How well do those fold up for travel? I sure don't need a lot more space and weight in my backpack when I'm travelling, but the Bose ear buds I just bought are going back because they aren't very comfortable on a long flight, plus they don't isolate the noise any better than what I had before.
    Matt, they both have nicely fitted cases. I give the Logitech’s a slight nod in their design. Rough case measurement is 2”X8”X10”
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  5. #5
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    Matt, some of the "poorer" reviews indicated issues with the hinge falling apart after a time.
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  6. #6
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    I ended up buying Sennheiser Noiseguards for $150. I felt they sounded better than Bose. While considerably more expensive than the logictechs, they are considerably cheaper than the Bose.

    John
    John Bailey
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  7. #7
    How do these items fit and work while wearing eyeglasses?
    Thanks. Bill Z

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Bailey View Post
    I ended up buying Sennheiser Noiseguards for $150. I felt they sounded better than Bose. While considerably more expensive than the logictechs, they are considerably cheaper than the Bose.
    John
    Bose has always had a huge marketing budget and that has always been reflected in its prices. I have a pair of Sennheisers as well, maybe the same ones as you, that I use for travel; they're perfect for that. In my workshop I use a pair that my wife bought me from Lee Valley. They knock down the sound levels tremendously, but I wouldn't want to wear them outside on a hot day.

    Sennheiser also has a cheaper model, somewhere in the $80 range.

  9. #9

    AO Safety i.3 Work Tunes headphones

    I bought a pair of these headphones at Christmas and really love them. Rockler had them on sale for $50.00. The AM/FM sound quality is fantastic and my shop is in an area with very poor reception. They are nice when I wear a barclovia type cap to keep my head warm outside and fit very comfortable over the cap. They have an adapter so you can plug your cell phone into them to catch incoming calls. Keeps my ears warm too.

  10. #10
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    A friend and I went shooting to sight in a couple of rifles. He had his first pair of noise canceling muffs (about $60) and a second pair he had gotten at Harbor Freight (on sale for under $20). I took the HF pair first and they worked just fine, you could talk normally but the muzzle report was way down. We switch muffs- and I didn't think the higher price pair did any better. Not a scientific comparison but one of the days when HF puts them on sale again I'm going to get a pair.
    Last edited by Ray Moser; 01-22-2008 at 9:06 PM. Reason: needed word change

  11. A Good Mechanic Never Forces Anything

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Matt, some of the "poorer" reviews indicated issues with the hinge falling apart after a time.
    Jim,
    You bring up a good point, worthy of clarification. These Logitechs have a hinged headband that enables them to lay flat in the case.

    They only swivel one way though. So you can turn them 90 degrees one way, and not be able to turn them the other way at all. In this case, when trying to put these in the carrying case for the first time, they grew frustrated, because they will not just go into the case, without swiveling them. So when they wouldn't swivel the wrong direction, they forced them, and broke the holder where they mount into the headband. In reality, these are built more substantially then the competition.
    Last edited by Bob Feeser; 01-22-2008 at 9:43 PM.
    "Fine is the artist who loves his tools as well as his work."

  12. #12
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    This is really a purely informational question...not trying to state a point of view here.

    those who could really benefit from hearing protection, while enjoying there favorite iPod tunes
    Does this make any of you all nervous (for yourself, not for others). I ask because is was working at the jointer the other day (benchtop, hooked up to shopvac - and wearing earmuffs - with the VS on the jointer turned way down) and had this "a-ha" kind of moment when I realized I wasn't hearing the jointer and sort of mentally caught myself...thought "wow, it would be easy to do something stupid like put your hand into the jointer, which you're not aware is running". Or something like that - harder to write and explain than it was in real life. Anyway...my next thought was: "wow, if I'd been paying a little less attention because I was listening to music, I'd have been that much closer to an accident."

    So, again, no bone to pick, no argument I'm advancing...just wondering if I'm the only one who worries that music might distract them?

  13. Quote Originally Posted by John Newell View Post
    This is really a purely informational question...not trying to state a point of view here.



    Does this make any of you all nervous (for yourself, not for others). I ask because is was working at the jointer the other day (benchtop, hooked up to shopvac - and wearing earmuffs - with the VS on the jointer turned way down) and had this "a-ha" kind of moment when I realized I wasn't hearing the jointer and sort of mentally caught myself...thought "wow, it would be easy to do something stupid like put your hand into the jointer, which you're not aware is running". Or something like that - harder to write and explain than it was in real life. Anyway...my next thought was: "wow, if I'd been paying a little less attention because I was listening to music, I'd have been that much closer to an accident."

    So, again, no bone to pick, no argument I'm advancing...just wondering if I'm the only one who worries that music might distract them?
    John,
    You brought up an excellent point. The quietest piece of equipment in my shop, that is either my Makita handheld router, or my JDS Dust Force large upper and lower bag system. With these headphones, you hear even the quiet dust force system as a pleasant whir in the background, even when the music is turned up to what I consider to be a max listening level, and the noise supression is on.
    Why does this happen, and how do these compare to other noise suppression headphones in this regard. In the Stereophile.com review, a professional audio publication, they ran tests on various noise cancellers. The Logitech when it came to noise reduction, they rated them excellent in the "sound pressure" and "lack of hiss" department. The db ratings on these are 22db noise reduction. Some others are 32. The more noise reduction, the more pressure you sense on your ears, and the "hiss" element can come into play. These have no hiss whatsoever, and the sound pressure is slight also, yet they block out the low tones wonderfully, yet allow the upper ones in. So if someone is talking to you, unless you have the music up a lot, you can hear them. Like I said, my jointer 8" PM running, you can hear the whir, my JDS dust collector, you can hear the whir, with my Craftsman 12" planer you can hear the whir, then when you lift the headphones, you hear this loud clackity clack, at a decibel rating that I am sure is an ear buster, but these Logitechs reduce that to a gently whir.
    So these are geared to gentle noise suppression, no hiss whatsoever, they allow enough through that you know when even the quietest machine is running, but do the job well enough that you can turn the music on low and enjoy it, and not be competing with that machine.
    Disclaimer: Consult a professional sound expert before deciding on any noise suppression device when working around dangerous machinery. What does Norm say, "Be sure to read, understand, and follow the manufacturers instructions before operating any piece of machinery" The above and my posts on the subject is just my opinion. As I mentioned before I am not selling these, just sharing what I have found to be delightful.
    Last edited by Bob Feeser; 01-22-2008 at 4:10 PM.
    "Fine is the artist who loves his tools as well as his work."

  14. #14
    For those considering a purchase decision, you might add the "Peltor Alert, Model M2RX7A" to the mix. I just picked up a set from Amazon, and am impressed. I friend of mine uses them in his woodshop and his Woodmiser (outdoor lumber mill) and other noisy items. He highly recommended them as well.

  15. #15
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    John, that's a good point. But I think it's dependent on the person wearing them and their typical level of concentration/attention. Personally, I have a set of the Peltor worktunes (22 dB) and only wear them when I'm mowing the lawn (when I wouldn't be able to hear anything anyway).

    In the shop I have a set of electronic shooting ear muffs (Walker's) that I love to wear. Crystal clear until the level comes up and then they essentially turn into a set of noise canceling phones with a 24 dB max reduction. They were expensive, but fit the best for shooting (shouldering rifles).

    For actual noise canceling headphones I have a set of Ear Hugger's (15 dB) which I thought were great - until I went to England last year and they issued Bose QC-2's for in flight use. I have since been trying different NCHP's to find something cheaper than the Bose, but that felt just as nice as well as the higher noise reduction. Based on this thread I got a set of the Logitech's and they are awesome. I'd put them right on par with my recollection of the Bose and they blow my Ear Hugger's away.

    One point though, if I have ANY NCHP's on, actively canceling noise, but in a quiet environment, I can hear a very distinct white noise hiss. This is true for the Ear Hugger's, Logitech's, and even the Bose. Do any of you hear this? Because many are saying there is no hiss. Now once they "go active" in a noisy environment I can't hear the hiss any more.

    Earlier in my career I cross-qualified as a sonar technician and still have VERY good hearing (thanks to constant hearing protection), especially in high frequencies (I can hear a tube TV hum from anywhere in the house). Is it that, or can you guys hear it too?

    Be well,

    Doc

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