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Thread: Shaker End Table

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Shaker End Table

    I like the Shaker style, but also like figured wood.

    What about a 18" square Shaker style end table.

    The base, drawer front, and legs would be made from Cherry. But the top would be book matched tiger maple.

    Would this look work?

    I already have a four foot by 10 inch piece of Tiger Maple that is incredible, the price was too.

  2. #2
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    Steve, I've made a couple of figured maple/cherry tables as you describe. One was cherry frame ang legs, then ribbon maple skirt and drawer fronts; about 24"w x 17"d x 27"h, telephone stand. Recipient liked it. Tables usually get things on top, kinda their purpose, so I use the figured stock where it will show in use, apron and drawer fronts. The second used maple for the top and mid shelf, with cherry framing and legs; 45"w x 21"d x 22"h, an over height coffe table. There the top would be more visiable and the face on view limited, so figure up. Ya just kinda try to see the end view when you choose the material distribution.

    Oh, the answer is: sure you can use figured woods in the shaker style. But as it is the antithesis of shaker dogma, it ain't shaker anymore, just pretty furniture.

    Helpful??

  3. #3
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    Steve

    I am sure the table would be beautiful as described. A point to note however, Shaker furniture, traditionally is very plain. Mainly Cherry or Poplar. If you are trying to duplicate the Shaker traditional style I would stick to simple w/1 type of wood.

  4. #4
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    Re: Steve

    Originally posted by Ken Salisbury
    I am sure the table would be beautiful as described. A point to note however, Shaker furniture, traditionally is very plain. Mainly Cherry or Poplar. If you are trying to duplicate the Shaker traditional style I would stick to simple w/1 type of wood.
    Steve -

    Gotta agree w/ Ken on this one. As I was reading the thread, his words were already forming in my head for a reply. Scary isn't it?

    Make a pretty table, just don't call it shaker. The tiger maple would really set it off.

    Ted

  5. #5
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    Beg to Differ

    Gentlemen

    If I may politely contradict you, here are two quotes from Making Authentic Shaker Furniture by John G. Shea.

    Sometimes an entire piece of furniture was made of one type of wood. But the Shakers were not reluctnat to mix their woods - particularly if one wood was better adapted than another for making certain parts.
    About the only decoration Shakers would tolerate was that inherent in beautiful wood graining...They seemed to have particular admiration for the grain patterns of birds-eye and curly maple...
    Both quotes are taken from page 75 just in case anyone wants to check up on me.

    I'd say go for it Steve. Here is one of my Shaker pieces I posted a while ago on the Pond. I have another Shaker inspired piece that uses very heavily figured wormy maple. I need to photograph it, and it will be posted shortly.

    <img src= "http://www.enter.net/~ultradad/curlyshaker01.jpg" >

    Bill

  6. #6
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    I meant

    Bill --- I meant they usually had palin designs and didn't usually mix wood types

  7. #7
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    Re: Beg to Differ

    Originally posted by Bill Grumbine
    Gentlemen

    If I may politely contradict you, here are two quotes from Making Authentic Shaker Furniture by John G. Shea.


    Sometimes an entire piece of furniture was made of one type of wood. But the Shakers were not reluctant to mix their woods - particularly if one wood was better adapted than another for making certain parts.
    About the only decoration Shakers would tolerate was that inherent in beautiful wood graining...They seemed to have particular admiration for the grain patterns of birds-eye and curly maple...

    Bill
    Bill -

    Interesting. I stand corrected. Don't recall seeing any deliberate use of "ornamental" wood.

    Thanks,
    Ted

  8. #8
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    Bill,

    How did you get that figure to pop like that.

    I'm planning on using a water based dye, followed by one coat of BLO and then probably four or five coats of amber shellac.

    Man I need help with finishing.

  9. #9
    Scott in Douglassville, PA Guest
    First, the table you describe showed up in a copy of Fine Woodworking last year - tiger maple top, nice, curly cherry base. This was a two-drawer design, with turned legs. Very pretty, and on my to-do list, as well. Was in a reply from Jon Arno about how figure develops in wood.

    Second, Bill's right. Shakers initially hid anything 'enflaming', but when that edict was thrown down later (have to look up the year) they quickly got big into highlighting beautiful grain in frame-and-panel designs and in prominent elements. They carried the whole concept to new heights. And they frequently mixed species, both as secondary woods and as primary woods for contrast.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by Steve Roxberg
    Bill,

    How did you get that figure to pop like that.

    I'm planning on using a water based dye, followed by one coat of BLO and then probably four or five coats of amber shellac.

    Man I need help with finishing.
    Hi Steve

    I finished this table with one good coat of BLO, and then three or four (I can't remember now) coats of Bartley's Gel Varnish. The gel varnish gives it a nice shine, but it is the BLO that pops the grain. A light wash with an aniline dye would do that too, depending on the color you want to end up with. This is fast and easy, and the results are great.

    Bill

  11. #11
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    Feb 2003
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    Massachusetts
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    Hi Steve,
    Here's my 1st attempt at it. Red Oak with my own mix of minwax stains.All M&T joinery.The top is 2 pcs.biscuited & glued.
    On the side is the table it replaced.
    I hope this helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by John M. Cioffi; 03-05-2003 at 6:50 PM.
    NOTHING beats a failure,but a try.
    -------------------------------------------
    Have a Blessed Day,

    JMC

  12. #12
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    Goot afternoon Bill from Central Florida, in the middle of a heat wave!!!!!! Sun is out and 86 on the outside!!!!!!!!!! Should be out racking leaves---------nah--------it might be to hot now. Besides if the Lord didn't want the leaves on the ground, He wouldn't let them fall of in the first place.

    I don't think there is enough words in the english language to discribe that beautiful piece of furniture!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    THANKS A HALF A MILLION, I'D THANKYOU A MILLION, BUT DON'T HAVE THAT MUCH AT THE MOMENT!!!!! HI HI HI for showing that beautiful piece of work!!!!!!!!!!

    My hat is off to you, if I wore a hat!!!
    RUSTYNAIL

  13. #13
    Bill,

    I still love that table. Did you ever sell it? Dave.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Ken Frantz
    Goot afternoon Bill from Central Florida, in the middle of a heat wave!!!!!! Sun is out and 86 on the outside!!!!!!!!!! Should be out racking leaves---------nah--------it might be to hot now.
    Ken, stop, you're killing me! Today we had a high of about 33 deg. The morning started out with freezing rain and sleet, and then changed over to about two inches of wet heavy snow. Then the sun came out so it could shine in my face on the way home from the city this afternoon.

    I'll be sure to think of you when it is a nice sunny, breezy 65 deg, the shop doors are all open, and the flowers are blooming. Then I'll say to myself, "Self, I wonder how Ken is doing down there in South Hades? Why I'll bet it must be close to 150 degrees in the shade, with 220% humidity!"

    Thanks for the compliments.

    Bill

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