View Poll Results: Do you have and use a brad nailer?

Voters
60. You may not vote on this poll
  • I use a brad nailer all the time.

    38 63.33%
  • I have one, but don't use it very often.

    13 21.67%
  • I use one, but hide the brads so well that you will never know, and I won't tell.

    6 10.00%
  • Real woodworkers use glue, brad nailers are cheating.

    3 5.00%
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Brad Nailers?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Granbury, TX
    Posts
    1,458

    Brad Nailers?

    I am considering buying a brad nailer, perhaps a Senco or Paslode.

    However, lots of folks make fun of Norm for using his "too much".

    There is a small jewelry box I want to make for my daughter. It is basically a scaled down version of a Shaker blanket chest. There is some molding around the top, and the bottom base which are both brad nailed to the main chest with a nailgun. The molding needs to be nailed vs. glue due to cross grain problems.

    I can see a few other situations where a brad nailer would come in useful, however, on a larger shaker piece, I want to learn how to use sliding dovetail trim attachments such as those by Becksvoort and Moser.

    So, if I use a brad nailer from time to time, is it a woodworking faux pas?

    I would like to hear your opinions on this matter.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Martin Shupe; 02-20-2004 at 7:22 PM.
    Martin, Granbury, TX
    Student of the Shaker style

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    53,262
    Pneumatic nailers are very convenient to have, both as a time saver and just because we all only have two hands.

    Do keep in mind that an 18 guage brad nailer might actually be too large for small moldings. For that, a 23 guage pinner is sometimes a better choice. And, of course, sometimes the 18 guage brad nailer is too small, both for "safe shooting" of longer fasteners and for strength. My choice there is a 15 guage angle finish nailer which uses fasteners that are more like "real nails" and has the ability to provide a lot of holding power in carcass construction, etc.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    I'd hate to have to go back to a hammer and nails. Bummer. That would really slow things for me. I have 18 ga, 16 ga, 15 ga, frammer gun, staplers. around ten I think.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Chappell Hill, Texas
    Posts
    4,741
    I use mine ALL DAY LONG. What a timesaver! I have a 15 gauge (old Senco SFN2) and 18 gauge (Senco FinishPro XP-25), 23 gauge Accuset Pin nailer, plus other air nailers/staplers.

    Everytime I drive a nail with a hammer, I bend it (well, not everytime - just when people are watching!)

    My advice would be that if you are recreating a museum piece, use what the original used. Otherwise, spend more time with your family and get a brad nailer!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Laguna Beach , Ca.
    Posts
    7,201
    I use mine often....it is very helpful for many things. When I make cabinets iI typicaly run a rabett along the back edges...a perfect application for a brad nailer. If you use a Kreg jig the pieces tend to move when the screws first enter...a brad nailer is great for that. I consider myself a woodworker that doesn't like to compromise...dovetails are always by hand etc. and I have no problem using a brad nailer. I have heard some people saw Maloof is not a purist because he uses screws in his chairs....that is just as ridiculous! If it makes it stronger , easier and doesn't compromise the look its fine as far as I am concerned....most of the time they don't show at all
    "All great work starts with love .... then it is no longer work"

  6. #6
    Can't imagine living without one. I installed our kitchen last year and used one for the first time...what was I thinking? It is without a doubt the best time saving tool I've bought in a long...long time. My thumb loves me for it also.
    Glenn Clabo
    Michigan

  7. #7

    Yeah!

    You bet, I use one. I use one all the time. In addition to my two brad nailers, I have an 18 gauge stapler. I am looking forward to purchasing a 15 gauge angle nailer as soon as I can afford one.
    Member - Uncle Sam's Misguided Children '82-'85.
    Once, Now Former, But Always!

    "Among individuals, as among nations, the respect for the other's rights brings peace."
    Benito Juarez

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Grand Marais, MN. A transplant from Minneapolis
    Posts
    5,513

    Thumbs up

    After the photos, xrays and war stories from two weeks ago I am hesitant to pick up mine again. but another trim out job is coming up so they will get cleaned, lubed and tuned ready for action.
    I couldn't drive a nail if I had to. Part of my Neanderthal quest has been to hand cut a board and drive some nails with the 24 oz framer everytime I go down to the shop.
    Last edited by Tyler Howell; 02-21-2004 at 9:16 AM.
    TJH
    Live Like You Mean It.



    http://www.northhouse.org/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Hudson Valley, Upstate NY
    Posts
    240
    Get the nailer. FWW just reviewed a bunch of 18 ga. nailers, and the Paslode faired pretty well. That review does not mention the height of each nailer though, which you should consider as 18 ga. nailers aren't angled, which can be a pain in tight corners. I have an 18ga. Bostich BT125k for thin moldings, which is "shorter" than it's big brother, the BT200k. For bigger items, I use a 15 ga. PC "DA" nailer. I really like the "DA" 15 ga. nailers better than other 15 ga. nailers, as, like Jim said above, they shoot something more like a real nail.
    Is the use of an air gun a faux pas? IMHO, no.
    Walt.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Laguna Beach , Ca.
    Posts
    7,201
    I have the Porter Cable Bn200....It is terrific and inexpensive...less than $100...
    "All great work starts with love .... then it is no longer work"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    27,335
    Martin, I have a Senco 15 ga finish nailer and an electric pinner (electric means it works "most of the time depending on the hardness of the wood") Like others above I'd recommend getting both. The 15 ga works well in finishing applications and uses nearly real nails. The problem is the 15 ga. can be too large for some molding applications. When driving really small brads by hand, I tend to bend them more often than I like. This can damage small moldings at the most inopertune time. My electric pinner works most of the time but in the near future I'll replace it with an air driven one. My electric doesn't bend them as often as I do but if the wood is too hard, it can leave them hanging out or worse yet, the pin gets deflected and bent over, leaving a larger than desire hole..defeating the purpose of using pins in the first place.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    325
    Martin,

    I just picked up a 18 ga Bostich this past weekend. I purchased a near new PC pancake a couple of weeks ago from a guy that was selling his shop (plus a HVLP gun, and a PC circ saw) So I had to go get a nail gun for it!

    Most nail guns are on sale at Menards until 2/22 (I think) I orginally purchased the B200 k2 Magnesium unit from Bostich, but when I test drove some 2" brads about 10% preztled. Maybe it was me but, I didn't want to risk it so, I got the SB-1850BN which is not oil-less, and not as high tech, but it seems to drive the brads straight, and it has a larger brad range than most 5/8"-2" I have some moulding and trim work to do today, so I'll see how it goes.

    Dave

  13. #13
    Martin
    Are you reading into the replies or are your eyes glazed over with the excitement and prospectus of getting a "NEW" brad nailer?
    I only read of one fellow that has the problem that I sometimes also have - the 18 ga nail gun squirting the nail into the wood and the nail following the grain and coming out the side of the cabinet. Boy! do you get mad!
    So now you have to make the decision as to whether to pull out frontwards or backwards. He-he! A rather profound situation - but then again you didn't bend the nail because you didn't hit it square with a hammer.
    So just be mindful of this - it happens to all of us.
    That's why Jim suggested the 15 ga nailer - the nails are stiffer and shoot straight more offen than not.

    By the way I have an 18 ga nailer, a pin nailer and a stapler.
    Staples for thin back boards on cabinets.
    Purchase whatever brand turns you on - the Sencos and Paslodes are good and the Craftsmans and PC and others are good - how much money do you have? Oh! - Oh! I like the new PC because the exhaust port is in the rear of the handle and the air blast doesn't mess up my curly locks.

    Keep your fingers out of the way, aways away, so if the nail curves - your fingers ain't there.
    Daniel
    "Howdy" from Southwestern PA

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Granbury, TX
    Posts
    1,458

    Thanks!

    Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it.

    I already have a compressor, so I won't have that expense.

    Now that I found out they are not "forbidden" by our board of woodworking experts, I can buy one without hiding my head in shame. Well, I will have to hide from the 3 anonymous people who said nailguns were cheating. You know who you are, but I don't, so I guess you will have to forgive me, or look at my future work with a skeptical eye.

    Of course, you have all made my decision more difficult. I started thinking I would need one 18 gauge nailer, now I think I also need a micro pinner as well. The question is, which to get first?

    Maybe I should get both, and hope I will use them enough to justify them...
    Martin, Granbury, TX
    Student of the Shaker style

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    53,262
    Martin, if you only can buy one right now, go for an 18 or 16 guage brad gun. If you can get two, get the brad gun and the pinner based on the things you said you'll want to do. Add a 15 guage angle nailer later as well as a narrow-crown stapler...to complete your "set".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •