Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 32

Thread: Lathe tool rack ideas?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Toronto, CA
    Posts
    312
    All my tools are modular. Chisels interchangeable with handles.
    Years ago I did a course with a local professional turner and he had all his tools in a Husky tool box.
    http://toolguyd.com/blog/wp-content/...rage-Combo.jpg

    These are great, but expensive.

    Last year I was offered a set of drawers that previously held architectural drawings, similar to this
    http://a3.southwestsolutions.com/ima...ng-storage.JPG

    Keep in mind that paper is insanely heavy, so the sliders are very high quality.
    And who needs paper drawings any more. So there's a glut of these on the market, used. Mine was free.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Palm Springs, CA
    Posts
    758
    I saw this type of cart posted online by a SoCal woodturner (B. Loitz?) years ago and made a modified copy for my self from his demo pics. It's compact and with 3 swiveling casters, can rotate 360 degrees within it's own foot print. A little top heavy until the tool holders are filled, then very stable.
    Loitz Type Cart 1.jpgLoitz Type Cart 2.jpgLoitz Type Cart 3.jpg
    Dick Mahany.

  3. #18
    I really like your preferred design and plan to copy it Having slots cut in front is an idea a super idea

    A huge thank you for posting

    regards Brian

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    774
    Better Tool Rack.jpg

    For my money, a tool rack has to meet this criteria:
    >> Compact-- lots of tools in a small space
    >> Tools Visible-- The tips of every tool needs to be pointed up so it can be identified quickly
    >> Easily organized-- The spaces need to be interchangeable so that all of the gouges, scrapers, etc can be grouped.
    >> Minimum of dust catching spots-- Shelf-type racks catch wood chips and other debris

    I probably tried five designs through the years -- some of them exactly what some of you have proposed here -- and finally settled on this one. No flats, no PVC tubes, no clumsy dividers, no rotating carts that need to be moved around and catch wood chips. It holds a whopping 33 handled tools (plus various chucks, spurs, awls, etc) in less than a 36-inch space, and every space can hold any size tool. The key is a slanted lower shelf that kicks the heel of the tool forward into place; debris slips off these spaces and fall to the floor. This design has been so successful I've sold half a dozen to other woodturners.

    Also attached is an earlier, smaller version of the same rack.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Russell Neyman; 02-02-2018 at 7:44 AM.
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    Past President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  5. #20
    This topic comes up often and there have been been many similar threads. I have posted pics of my tool racks and the PDF file below previously, but it may be worth posting them again. The design is not mine, but was posted by a couple of creekers that generously provided the measurements some years ago. These racks are easy to build, but one needs wall space conveniently situated to the lathe in order for them to be appropriate. However, it would seem easy enough to affix them to a mobile stand constructed of scrap lumber.

    I prefer these over having to reach across or among other tools to reach the tool I need. Like others, my tools are always very sharp and I do not think it wise to have to avoid other edges to grab a gouge. I also want to be able to grasp the handle firmly with no chance of the tool slipping thru my hand. I also do not like the PVC tubes for the above reasons, as well as potential accumulation of debris in the tubes.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Attached Files Attached Files

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    762
    That's a nice simple design. I like that the sloping bottom plate wot't accumulate much dust or shavings.

    Looks like a lot of D-Way handles up there!
    Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened.
    - Churchill

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,622
    Agree with John that having the handle up or a rack where the tool leans against the back is better. To each his own!
    Don

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    5,637
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Neyman View Post

    >> Tools Visible-- The tips of every tool needs to be pointed up so it can be identified quickly
    You certainly need to be able to immediately locate, identify, and grab the tool you want.

    How one configures the tool rack might depend on the type of turning done. Someone who turns only bowls will often have different needs and fewer tools than someone who turns everything.

    I keep turning tools in several racks, on shelves, and drawers, all within reach at the lathe or within two or three steps. A few dozen short scrapers, parting tools, texturing tools, tiny spindle gouges, and special purpose tools lay flat on several shelves, all with points towards me so I can see what's what. Big bowl gouges are in their own rack. Hollowing tools are I don't use often are in cases I get out as needed.

    Most of the rack pictures I've seen don't address what to do with unhandled tools that are swapped in handles as needed. For example, I have 6 identical Thompson 3/8" spindle gouges and I swap a dull one for a sharp one then sharpen when they are all dull. The spares plus a collection of Hunter and other unhandled tools are within reach in shallow drawers in the workbench immediately behind me.

    The tools I use the most are on a wall rack where I can grab the one I want quickly, whether in permanent handles or mounted in handles with adapters. The rack is made from a piece of plywood on a wood frame, the tools held with short lengths of clear plastic tubing slipped over deck screws. I can easily reconfigure the rack by moving screws which I've done several times so far.

    My helper working on the rack and the rack mounted on the wall at the end of the lathe:

    tool_rack.jpg lathe_PM_Jan17_IMG_5751.jpg

    I've tried several configurations over the years and this is definitely the most efficient both when I'm turning or when I have a student or two in the shop.

    BTW, the turning gouges, skews, and such are only a small part of the storage and access issue at the lathe. It takes much more space and planning to keep everything else at hand within a few steps: live and drive centers, tool rests, knockout bars and draw bars, chucks and keys, drill bits and Jacob's chucks, hones, measuring tools, screw drivers and allen wrenches, saws, burnishers, hand scrapers, sanding disks and paper, files and sanding sticks, rotary and hand carving tools, finishing and solvent supplies, vacuum chucking stuff, buffing tools, glues, sharpening things, safety glasses and face shields, respirators, fire extinguisher, flashlight, pencils and markers, pen-making stuff, indexing plates, templates, special jigs such as for threading, etc..., and of course, wood. I have cabinets, tool boxes with shallow drawers, racks, and open shelves all around my lathe alcove for most of it. One reason I like to visit other's shops is to see what clever ideas they've come up with.

    JKJ

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Dooling View Post
    ...Looks like a lot of D-Way handles up there!
    I really like Daveís handles as well as his tools. By the numbers, most of my go to tools are Thompson. Doug and Dave both make quality tools, and they do not really have much duplication between them. Each makes tools I find indispensable. But, Daveís handles feel better to me than Dougís. My shop is heated in the winter to around 55-60* and I donít like the idea of picking up a bare aluminum tool handle. The covering Dave uses feels comfortable regardless of the season and my D-Way and Thompson tools will both fit.

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    774
    The tool tips (D-Way, etc) can easily be stored by drilling the appropriate sized hole in a shelf, then keeping it from falling through with a cup hook strategically placed on the underside. You can see that feature in the right front of my rack.
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    Past President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    lufkin tx
    Posts
    1,917
    All my wall racks are full of seldomer? used tools--my gouges(can you have too many) are in a beautiful brass planter (12"X12" can full of these swimming pool worm like floating toys cut to an appropiate length and glued in to fill up the can. Reaching down to grab a tool is so convienant to an old pistol shooter like me and on the floor--no reaching over the lathe!. The "worms protect the tools and the tips never touch the bottom. Find your own can.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    126
    I've been needing a tool rack and got inspired by this thread. I have limited space. So I made this swing out tool holder. It swings out over the tail of the lathe and swings back under the cabinet on the wall It holds 22 tools. The bowl gouges would not clear the cabinet unless put in upside down. It'll do for now as I learn to turn. The small tools are the sharpened R.S. tools I posted about purchasing in a separate thread. Tell me what you think.


    IMG_1237.jpgIMG_1238.jpgIMG_1240.jpgIMG_1241.jpg

  13. #28
    Here is a 15 second video that shows what I did: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZjNN9XwKhM

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Anderson View Post
    Here is a 15 second video that shows what I did: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZjNN9XwKhM

    I like it. I guess everyone makes custom to fit their space. I'm brand new to turning. Not really sure how much I'll actually do. For now, I'm at least set to play around a bit.

  15. #30
    Does anyone have the plans for the Jeff Wright holder?? I see there are plans on a North Carolina clubs site. You have to be from the NC area to join... Looking for plans if possible. Thanks!

Similar Threads

  1. Clothes drying rack ideas?
    By Ben Grunow in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-05-2007, 2:55 PM
  2. Shop Tour #3 - Monster lathe
    By lou sansone in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 03-28-2007, 10:05 AM
  3. Lathe Tool Holder / Bucket Design
    By Thomas Canfield in forum Turner's Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-20-2006, 11:23 PM
  4. Tool definitions
    By Dave Bartley in forum Off Topic Forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-07-2005, 9:51 AM
  5. lathe tool sanding jig
    By Bill Esposito in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-18-2003, 9:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •