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Thread: Jointer Education

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    131

    Jointer Education

    OK, this post is some questions and some recent observations.

    First, please don't tear into me for my current equipment. I currently own a Delta benchtop jointer, space is a preimium for my 22' X 13' shop that also gives up 3' X 6' for a garden storage space. I need more room!

    On my recent project which I need to edge glue 5/4 and 4/4 maple for a head and foot board I noticed a how difficult getting a good edge was. The peices I'm running on the jointer are about 76"-80" in length, this small jointer is only about 26" in length.

    Basically, with any jointer you would seem to only be making straight the given length of the tools bed at a given time? On my tool that mean I am only getting a 26" straight pass and moving this along the piece. If I had a 48" bed jointer, I would have much more accurate edges. Is this thinking correct

    Also, when running piece through the tool for edge jointer how much downward pressure is needed? Another thing I notice is that on longer pieces the pressure will vary and therefore the cut is varied a bit as well.

    Given all this my pieces are coming together but not without many passes on the jointer to get things right, but I'm certain I'm working way too hard to just get an edge ready for glueing. I'm looking into ways to incorporate a 48" 6" jointer but also wanted feedback on this first.

    All perspectives are appreciated.

  2. #2
    If it were me I'd use a glue line rip blade on the table saw and edge joint em on the TS.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Placitas, NM in the foothills of the Sandia Mountain.
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    527

    I feel your pain....

    Hey Michael. I hear you. I used to have the Delta benchtop jointer - what a pain! I tried attaching shop made outfeed tables to the jointer and they helped a little, but its probably not wise to try to joint anything longer than a yard or so. I recently acquired a reasonably sized shop and the first thing I upgraded was the jointer.

    For longer boards, you might try the previous advice to edge joint them with a tablesaw or with a router and a guide. A jointer plane would cost you a few $$ and take some serious elbow grease, but personally I enjoy using it a lot more than the machinery. You can also take them to a lumberyard and have them milled for a small charge.

    When you are thinking about getting a new larger jointer, one of the great things is that it needs almost no clearance away from the wall. I have mine on a mobile base and move it out of the way when I won't need it for a while.

    By the way, don't put much pressure on the boards - let the tool do the work!

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    The jointer, if set up correctly, should do nicely.

    Of course it's be nice to have an aircraft carrier for a jointer but hey it's still all in the technique.

  5. #5
    Your jointer is a bit small for pieces that long. You really need a larger jointer or use the TS method others have suggested.

    You can use a router with a straight template to joint the edges. I think Wood magazine or Workbench magazine did an article on this a while back.

    As far as pressure goes, you don't want to press down too hard or you may flex the board and produce and uneven edge. With the oard on the infeed table you apply downward pressure and pressure against the fence as you slide the board across the cutter, once you have a length on the out feed table that is nearly the length of the outfeed table you want to switch your grip to the outfeed side and apply downward pressure only on the outfeed table. This will give you your best edge.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Contribute

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lehigh Valley, PA
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    An oft-cited rule of thumb is that you can joint boards up to about 2x the total bed length of the jointer. Having done 7' boards on my 45" long jointer, I think that's a pretty fair guideline. So, a 6" standard bed jointer would be an improvement, but then you're just going to want an 8" eventually.

    Downward pressure should be just enough to keep the board in solid contact with the tables. The problem, as you've likely found, is that when you have a long board cantilevered way off the end of the table, it takes a lot of down force to keep it contact. This in turn makes it hard to get a "feel" for consistent pressure through the entire pass.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    N Illinois
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    What Kent said: Double the bed length is max. I had a chance to buy a BT recently and passed on it for that reason. Most rough stock is 7-9 ft long. You'll prob want an 8" eventually...
    Jerry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    856
    It sounds like you're on the right track and the suggestions you have received so far are great. I only have one thing to add, given your jointer I would not try to use it for the really long pieces and would instead use a #7 or #8 hand plane. True, if you buy a LN it will cost $$$, however I made my own with scrap wood and a $30 iron and it works great. Here is the thread on the one I made http://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=24410.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Atlanta
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    This thread is confirming what I had thought, the BT jointer is just too small for long boards. As for the use of a hand plane to get edges true for edge glueing I'm not too sur eI trust my ability with the hand plane there! I think a 48" jointer will need to be in my future. I agree that the 8" is desirable but with size and money issue I'll have to stick with the 6" models.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sumter, SC
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    Michael,

    There are several techniques that would work well for this. One that hasn't been mentioned is the EZ Smart guide system. With a good blade the EZ will give you glue quality cuts just like a good table saw. If you want to add a little better edge, put a hand held electric planer on the Smart Router Kit and get a perfect edge. Either process can be done in limited space. To learn more go to www.eurekazone.com oe visit the EZ forum right here on sawmill creek. Infact here is a link to a photo on the ez forum.


    http://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=40929








    Burt
    Last edited by Burt Waddell; 08-14-2006 at 7:22 PM.

  11. #11
    Or he could spend his money and buy the Festool Guided system. If your gonna plug one Guided system you need to give fair time to the other one too. I don't have either not going to spend my money on more tools I'd rather buy more wood.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Mpls, Minn
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    2,882
    Just wondering, would them roller stands help with joining long boards???
    Thinking of also getting them for my planer maybe.

    Al

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sumter, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer
    Or he could spend his money and buy the Festool Guided system. If your gonna plug one Guided system you need to give fair time to the other one too. I don't have either not going to spend my money on more tools I'd rather buy more wood.
    Don,

    Two reasons I didn't include Festool:

    1 - Their guide rail flexes to match the twist of the wood. I don't think that would work well for a straightline cut. ( It would work on perfect stock)

    2 - Festool does not offer a planer for use in this fashion.

    When they have these options available, I'll give them credit and include them.

    Burt

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sumter, SC
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    Don,

    I have just been corrected. You can put a piece of 3/4" plywood under the festool rail to stiffen it and use the Smart Router Kit that EZ Smart makes for the Festool and do the same thing. Just remember - either way - the EZ is essential.

    Burt

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    822
    It's not clear from your post what problem you're having. when you say you're not getting a "good edge", what do you mean? I suspect that you may be having trouble holding long boards tightly against the fence.

    I always take a final pass with #7. I don't have a L-N, just a Record. With the boards clamped back to back, it's not rocket science and it makes a perfect joint.

    Pete

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