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Thread: Pictures and description of my bench ( 11 pictures)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    extreme southeast Nebraska
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    Pictures and description of my bench ( 11 pictures)

    I finally took the pictures I forgot to last weekend, then I saw a picture of a Coffin Makers Bench 13 foot long over on Traditional Tools. It seems I unknowingly made a short version of a CMB. But it was made to space and weight specifications of moving it constantly in a small space.

    My bench top is 5 foot long 11 1/4 inches wide, 4 inches thick made of Linden (Bass Wood). It is 36 inches tall and has 19 inch wide feet of Ash, and the stretcher and off end are also of Ash. The vise leg is of Bass Wood. The Vise and the Apron are of Oak.

    A view of the working side showing the hole spacing in the Apron and the 4 bench hold downs at the end.


    The vise with metal screw, and showing the bottom adjustment holes and the 3/4 hole in the top for clamping peg.


    The large double screw vise of Oak.


    In place on the bench.


    Notice the 2 flat head brass screws in the top countersunk below the top a bit. One is up just a ways showing how I use it as a stop to plane narrow strips. 1/8 thick is shown.
    Last edited by harry strasil; 06-25-2006 at 2:47 PM.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  2. #2
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    extreme southeast Nebraska
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    My Bench - Part 2

    I use a wedge system with pegs in the top 3/4 holes to clamp hard to hold pieces for planing. This view is for right to left planing so the plane will work on the tapered piece and the bench top will not interfere.


    A view from the end showing the pegs on the back side.


    Wedges reversed for planing when the grain is the other direction.


    Shorter pegs and thinner wedges for thinner material.


    The different pegs and wedges laid out on the top, the 3 odd ones have brass tops for using with the vise to hold long stuff.


    The peg and wedge system is all stored in this box.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Northern Virginia
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    243
    Jr, thanks for posting these! I really like how much you've fit into a small package. This thread's a keeper.

    Maurice

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
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    63
    Hi Harry,

    Great thread. I found the peg and wedge set-up you use particularly interesting. I've previously tried to make similar wedges but have had limited success. I can see though that the slope on your wedges is not as steep as the ones I made and maybe this was my problem. I think I'll try again but this time make wedges that look more like yours.
    Regards,
    Ian.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    W'burg, VA
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    442
    Great pics of a great bench. BZ Phil

  6. #6
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    It really is easy to forget how simple it can be and work great. I probably would discover it quickly using them but the direction of the wedges didn't even register with me before you mentioned reversing them. Looks to be a well thought-out bench.

  7. #7
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Harry, even as a "tailed guy" (figuratively and literally... ) I can really see the practicality of this bench for so many things and it really gives you easy access to the workpiece. That bench is designed for working wood and working it well!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Hi Harry,

    I have loved your bench since the first pics I saw of it. Simple and straight forward. What sort of projects do you usuallly handle? I am curious because the bench is smaller that I would have though practical (I'm longing for one about 8ft long and 2ft or less wide).

    Thanks,
    Steve Kubien
    Ajax, Ontario

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    extreme southeast Nebraska
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    anything I want, make lots of 4, 5, and 6 foot long setting benches on it.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  10. That is one cool bench. I love the way the sides are dovetailed to the top. Looks heavy duty, yet portable.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Grand Marais, MN. A transplant from Minneapolis
    Posts
    5,513
    Really like the size Harry,

    Perrrrrrrrfic for my limited space.
    TJH
    Live Like You Mean It.



    http://www.northhouse.org/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Plano, TX
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    2,036
    Harry, isn't Bass wood a little too soft as a bench top. I really like how you have made a small bench so flexible and adaptable.
    The means by which an end is reached must exemplify the value of the end itself.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    extreme southeast Nebraska
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    Yes, Zahid it is, but under the circumstances it is ideal for what I needed in a bench, its light enough to move around with ease, and solid enough for chiseling etc.

    This is only my portable demonstrating bench and I have a limited amount of space in my trailer to store it in. And with the help of my little 2 wheel cart I can remove it, move it to a remote location and set it up with ease.

    Along with all the above, it was kiln dried, 8 ft long and the fella even ran it thru his planer to remove the sawmill marks, all for $20, I could not resist it for those reasons, and I am careful using it. After all it only gets used maybe 30 days a year or less.

    As an aside it sure is easy to touch up if the top gets dinged up. LOL

    There is no glue used in its construction only Dovetails and Mortice and Tenon joints with pegs and 6 3/8 by 3 inch or so wood screws to help hold the apron on, it will easily completely dissasemble if need be.

    Its just perfect for what it was intended for.
    Last edited by harry strasil; 06-28-2006 at 11:08 AM.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Columbia City , Indiana
    Posts
    270
    Harry
    I like this bench. I will study these pics and demensions and maybe build one as soon as I get my other projects finished..
    I Love My Dedicated Machines ! And My Dedicated Wife Loves Me !

  15. #15
    Harry,

    Very,very cool!!!! I really like it. Thanks for posting.

    Terry
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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