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Thread: Possibly a bathroom cabinet from Titanic

  1. #1
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    Possibly a bathroom cabinet from Titanic


  2. #2
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    When I built a replica of a Titanic deck chair years ago from plans made from a surviving chair in the museum in Nova Scotia, I found that 7 deck chairs were recovered. To this day I have no clue why anyone on the Carpathia was picking up deck chairs when there were bodies in the water everywhere. Picking up this cabinet falls in the same category.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  3. #3
    nice catch/cool detail!
    Thanks for posting.

    smt

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    When I built a replica of a Titanic deck chair years ago from plans made from a surviving chair in the museum in Nova Scotia, I found that 7 deck chairs were recovered. To this day I have no clue why anyone on the Carpathia was picking up deck chairs when there were bodies in the water everywhere. Picking up this cabinet falls in the same category.
    Some were retrieved by the Mackay-Bennett and I'm sure others floated to shore



    https://titanicrelics.com/items/show/38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    When I built a replica of a Titanic deck chair years ago from plans made from a surviving chair in the museum in Nova Scotia, I found that 7 deck chairs were recovered. To this day I have no clue why anyone on the Carpathia was picking up deck chairs when there were bodies in the water everywhere. Picking up this cabinet falls in the same category.
    As macabre as it may seem, removing the wreckage may have aided in recovering the unfortunate passengers.

    There were likely many other motives for retrieving useable artifacts. Anywhere from personal use to maybe selling for a few dollars.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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    The dovetails caught my eye. Haven't seen that before.
    That is a great way to make a bridle joint retain it stiffness if the glue fails. Very well thought for a piece that to be used in a maritime environment where moisture may soften the glue used at that time.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    When I built a replica of a Titanic deck chair years ago from plans made from a surviving chair in the museum in Nova Scotia, I found that 7 deck chairs were recovered. To this day I have no clue why anyone on the Carpathia was picking up deck chairs when there were bodies in the water everywhere. Picking up this cabinet falls in the same category.
    Such floating debris is considered a Hazard to Navigation. A sail boat or small fishing boat, for example, could be seriously damaged if it rammed a deck chair or cabinet. Likely those objects would float just below the surface and would be hard to see. I don't know the history, but likely the Titanic objects were recovered after all survivors and bodies were recovered.

    Example: When I was in the Navy aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt, we rescued two guys who were clinging to a capsized trimaran in the Caribbean. After we rescued them, we sent a message to the US Coast Guard informing them of the capsized trimaran as a Hazard to Navigation. One of the Coast Guard's many duties to remove or sink Hazards to Navigation. Not sure which they did in the case of that trimaran.
    Last edited by Pat Germain; 07-09-2024 at 4:50 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weber View Post
    Some were retrieved by the Mackay-Bennett and I'm sure others floated to shore



    https://titanicrelics.com/items/show/38
    Thanks for the information, Edward. Never knew that.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Germain View Post
    Such floating debris is considered a Hazard to Navigation. A sail boat or small fishing boat, for example, could be seriously damaged if it rammed a deck chair or cabinet. Likely those objects would float just below the surface and would be hard to see. I don't know the history, but likely the Titanic objects were recovered after all survivors and bodies were recovered.

    Example: When I was in the Navy aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt, we rescued two guys who were clinging to a capsized trimaran in the Caribbean. After we rescued them, we sent a message to the US Coast Guard informing them of the capsized trimaran as a Hazard to Navigation. One of the Coast Guard's many duties to remove or sink Hazards to Navigation. Not sure which they did in the case of that trimaran.
    I did a friends and family ride on the Roosevelt almost 30 years ago. It was complete with airshow, dropping 1000lb bombs 500' off deck, and breaking the sound barrier 50' above deck. It was one of the greatest experiences of my life.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Yetka View Post
    I did a friends and family ride on the Roosevelt almost 30 years ago. It was complete with airshow, dropping 1000lb bombs 500' off deck, and breaking the sound barrier 50' above deck. It was one of the greatest experiences of my life.
    I may have been there with you.

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