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Thread: Acquiring a used Martin T 60 Classic

  1. #16
    Lutz used to have a bronco and the diffs or something failed on those. He just redesigned it looking at why they failed and made the parts. he used to get drawings for airplane stuff, machines to test cycle stuff. Drawings were outsourced to India. He said some drawings were wrong and designs were at times poor and would tell them this will do 300,000 cycles if you change this and that.

    Makes me think of one airline now on the edge of massive fines.

  2. #17
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    To clarify the reason for my recommendation for the blocking down low, with just straps, any movement can potentially stretch/loosen them. Hard blocking down low prevents the machinery from shifting position in the open truck bed so that less stress is placed on the strapping. For the cost of a few 2x boards, it's easy and efficient to "do the deed". I'd not only do this laterally, but also back to the rear corners of the box truck bed just outside the door frame to also provide front to back support. Down low is also where things are strongest on the truck.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
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    Make sure it can't shift while driving and/or in a situation where there is an abrupt stop. IMO, while a box truck is probably fine with the weight, but if it doesn't have good locations to strap the machine down to the floor I would find another way to transport it.

    A box truck with only the ability to strap the walls is not something I would consider using, the walls aren't sturdy enough to secure a 2500lb load.

    I've rented box trucks occasionally and I'm always very much unimpressed by their locations for strapping a load down. My favorite vehicle for this type of task, so far has been a flat bed so long as you aren't running into inclement weather.

    I picked up a Hapfo lathe last summer and boy were the sellers happy to see me show up with a flatbed. We loaded in about 10 minutes, strapped down with multiple 4000lb straps and drove safely.
    Last edited by Brian Holcombe; 07-09-2024 at 9:46 AM.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #19
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    I bought my Felder CF741 used and picked it up in a box truck. The machine weighs close to 3000 lbs. Felder has clamps that attach to the bottom of the machine and you simply screw them down to the bed of the box truck. Martin probably doesn't have a similar mechanism, but you may be able to screw anchors into the wooden bed of the box truck and attach tie downs to them.

  5. #20
    bases are different on different machines four feet radial four feet dovetailer and fine im always adapting to each machine and the tow set up. I take photos as when I do it next time dont really remember and just see waht i did past. Biggest offender to me is the trailers and lack of hooks. The 25 was for a reason, lots of places and when dont you can still tarp to other rings if you want. Enclosed we used a car trailer 26 foot for the trailer and chains and floor blocks screwed in only four hooks I was aware of on that one. Moved the machine on a lift truck that I had mcgivered up with hooks so the planer was strapped to the pump truck. Then used the car winch in the trailer to pull the pump truck up the ramp. Crazy to have a 26 foot enclosed trailer for a thickness planer However wasnt set up at the time and just starting to work on it to get this other wally wagon running. then get a new trailer. gone as far as six hours for a machine so far. Have not crossed the border yet, one other thing to ad to the adventure if so.

  6. #21
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    Make sure you have at least four straps from each corner to one corner of the trailer. Do not be fooled and use one strap wrapped around one end of the machine and tied down at opposite sides/ends of the trailer. This will not stop the machine from shifting side to side or front to back.
    Bill D

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Make sure you have at least four straps from each corner to one corner of the trailer. Do not be fooled and use one strap wrapped around one end of the machine and tied down at opposite sides/ends of the trailer. This will not stop the machine from shifting side to side or front to back.
    Bill D
    He's using a UHaul box truck, not a trailer. Hence, all the discussion about blocking in addition to strapping.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
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    Just to reiterate what Rod said regarding immobilizing the slider and the importance. Just be sure to check with Ed Papa to ensure it has been done, if you don't ask and isn't done, then causes damage its to late. As you already know, beautiful saw, good choice.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Erickson View Post
    Just to reiterate what Rod said regarding immobilizing the slider and the importance. Just be sure to check with Ed Papa to ensure it has been done, if you don't ask and isn't done, then causes damage its to late. As you already know, beautiful saw, good choice.
    I don’t think Ed is involved with this saw (I could be wrong). I believe Jonathan is picking up the saw himself. Agreed on wedging the slider to immobilize and take load off bearings.

  10. #25
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    Good idea about blocking the saw in place instead of relying just on straps. I'll probably set the saw at the front of the box and use 2x4s to wedge it in place on all four sides. So the saw physically can't slide in any direction.

    The tie-down points in Uhaul box trucks are whimpy, just a 1x3 horizontally all the way around about 3' off the floor.
    JonathanJungDesign.com

  11. #26
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    You should anchor it to the bed of the truck. Most box trucks (I don't know about U Haul) have a wood bed. Use engineered screws to fix it to the bed so it cannot move or tip.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/GRK-Fast...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
    Last edited by Mike King; 07-11-2024 at 11:26 AM.

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    You should anchor it to the bed of the truck. Most box trucks (I don't know about U Haul) have a wood bed. Use engineered screws to fix it to the bed so it cannot move or tip.
    U-Haul trucks have aluminum beds and are really not set up for anchoring heavy cargo. There may be other rental alternatives with wood beds. I used to rent Penske trucks for cabinet delivery so I could screw into the wood bed, but I am not sure I would trust GRKs into a bed of unknown thickness to hold down a 1.5 ton machine coming to a sudden halt. Better than nothing for sure. If I were relying on 2x4 blocking to keep that load from shifting I would want to link the blocks together and perhaps get some up higher than the floor to prevent tipping. I always get a bit nervous when transporting machines and would rather overdo securing the load than trust to luck. If it were me I would consider hiring a freight company and flying down to oversee the loading.

  13. #28
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    I moved my CF741, which weighs about 2,500 lbs, doing so at the direction of my broker, an individual who has sold, transported, and delivered a wide range of very heavy woodworking and machining equipment. He is the one who said to use the GRK fasteners into the bed of the truck. Think about it -- the original delivery had the saw anchored to a pallet. You are doing the same thing by anchoring it to the bed of the truck. Certainly some blocking to keep it from tipping; but you still need something to anchor it from shifting. And tying it to some flimsy rails on the side of the truck isn't going to provide much resistance to it shifting/sliding.

    A freight company is a disaster waiting to happen. The number of stories of very heavy machines that have been destroyed by the freight hauler dropping a machine off of the drop gate, running into it in a transfer warehouse, etc. is incredible and trying to collect from the hauler or insurer is a full time job that seems to be fairly pointless. You could hire a rigging company but that would be incredibly expensive for them to move a machine more than 1,000 miles.

    If it were me, I'd dump the Uhaul and rent a Penske.

    I don't know what the T60 weighs, but the current Martin T66 weighs about 2,500 lbs.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike King; 07-11-2024 at 12:25 PM.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike King View Post
    A freight company is a disaster waiting to happen. The number of stories of very heavy machines that have been destroyed by the freight hauler dropping a machine off of the drop gate, running into it in a transfer warehouse, etc. is incredible and trying to collect from the hauler or insurer is a full time job that seems to be fairly pointless. You could hire a rigging company but that would be incredibly expensive for them to move a machine more than 1,000 miles.



    Mike
    Mike, good point. What I was thinking of was an independent hauler, an individual or small company with a suitable truck who would pick up and deliver the load under the owner's supervision with no transfers on the way. If a wooden floored truck was available I would use that, blocking the machine feet from sliding and attaching d-rings to the floor for ratchet straps. A U-haul would be my last choice, they're just not well-suited.

  15. #30
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    These are the types of delivery vehicles/freight service I use and have had great luck with:
    image000001.jpg
    I’m not trying to persuade Jonathan or anyone else to go this route, as I think he will figure it out and be just fine. I do think there might be a slight miscommunication when some folks talk about machine deliveries. It doesn’t always mean LTL shipments from large freight companies involving numerous forklift operators who only care about how quickly the can load and unload a trailer. These smaller air ride side curtain deliveries are surprisingly affordable.

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