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Thread: Lovin' the Mini-Split

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    NE OH
    Posts
    2,668
    Not to rain on anyone's parade, but make sure you inspect and clean the interior coils and drip pan frequently. Recent discussion on the Fine Homebuilding Podcast about how some models/installations are prone to mold growth. I don't have a mini-split so I didn't pay much attention to the specific reasons, but one cause had to do with incomplete draining of the condensate because of the drain position or design, which can lead to water sitting in the tray fostering mold growth. One suggestion was the regular use of some sort of tablet in the tray to prevent mold formation. The podcast was within the last couple of months for those wanting to get more info.
    --I had my patience tested. I'm negative--

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    66,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Selzer View Post
    The unit you have is a better fit for your space. For dehumidification purposes a unit that runs 100% of the time at the highest outside air temperature is best. A unit that runs part of the time will leave the space clammy due to high humidity.
    Ron
    True in some cases, but context is required. Mini splits are modern inverter designs so they have significant variable speed capabilities, unlike traditional heat pumps. With a traditional heat pump, you get the on-off cycle you mention and that's inefficient. With the mini split, the air handler runs 100% of the time, even when the compressor outside doesn't need the fan running to do the heat exchange. You get heat or AC proportional to the need. It's also why these units can grab heat down to pretty low temps...mine is good to -14F, although that would truly be a rare moment here in SE PA. This is one reason that if I ever replace our home's heat pump, it will be an inverter type. But the bottom line is that if I had gone for the 36K unit rather than the 24K unit, it would handle the extremes better while providing the same performance and economy that the 24K unit is providing, given the extra cubic feet of air that needs to be conditioned with my shop's open to the roof design.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 07-03-2024 at 8:01 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    If I had to do it again I'd install a Mr. Cool. I installed a Pioneer unit in my shop a couple of years ago. Purchased the gauges, flaring tool, vacuum pump, torque wrench, crows feet sockets, etc, and did it all myself. Way too much hassle. Months later I found out I had a tiny slow leak so I had to buy more refrigerant, redo the connections and do it all over again. Not fun.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    9,344
    Terry, did you pressure test it with nitrogen first?

  5. #20
    I chose the non-DIY route and have a Mitsubishi hyper heat 18K BTU on order with a local contractor. Other quotes were slightly higher for Durastar and Daikin. Now I just need to decide where to mount it in my garage/shop. I do hope to leave a couple feet above it for a pre-filter, if I ever decide to do that.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    11,360
    Quote Originally Posted by George Yetka View Post
    Im a mechanical contractor, One would think Id be setup climate wise in my garage. Nope.. Just added heat last year but still no ac.
    Classic case of the Cobblers children George

    Regards, Rod.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
    Posts
    704
    On Monday we spent the first night in our newly-created 350 sf master bedroom and the mini-split was largely responsible. The central AC started acting up Friday afternoon and I wasn't about to call for a repair in the middle of the July 4 holiday weekend.

    The room was close enough to finished to start using. It was intended to be relatively isolated and self-sufficient and also added new space to the house so we included a 9000 BTU Mitsubishi.

    There's really nothing to say about the mini-split except that it works. It's been running for a few months during construction and has been seriously abused at times, with windows left open in record-breaking heat and humidity and fumes from refinishing the oak floor and painting. With the remote on the bedside table it was no effort and hardly any delay to change the temperature. That was never going to happen with the central system. We love it.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    The old pueblo in el norte.
    Posts
    1,952
    I got 4 tons of mini splits being installed this month now. Hopefully the electrical's before .. or at least soon after. Really looking forward to it now.
    ~mike

    happy in my mud hut

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,963
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin View Post
    Not to rain on anyone's parade, but make sure you inspect and clean the interior coils and drip pan frequently. Recent discussion on the Fine Homebuilding Podcast about how some models/installations are prone to mold growth. I don't have a mini-split so I didn't pay much attention to the specific reasons, but one cause had to do with incomplete draining of the condensate because of the drain position or design, which can lead to water sitting in the tray fostering mold growth. One suggestion was the regular use of some sort of tablet in the tray to prevent mold formation. The podcast was within the last couple of months for those wanting to get more info.
    My unit has a "SELF Cleaning" mode. It runs through a cycle and supposedly will kill any bacteria or mold. My current unit is in my basement which stays dry as anywhere in the house (40% at 75F right now)
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