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Thread: Time or Money?

  1. #1

    Time or Money?

    Yesterday, I needed to paint three pieces if flat iron about 16" long. Painting would include primer and two top coats. I had two choices in paints, rattle cans at about seven bucks each, or use less than a quarter's worth of both primer and top coat in spray gun. But using spray gun meant cleaning it twice (primer, and top coat.) Each cleaning takes about ten minutes, and some mineral spirits. FYI, for mineral spirits, I use charcoal lighter fluid. Recycle spent MS into a jar, let solids settle out and reuse again. So it comes to two choices, spend money buying rattle can, or spend time cleaning sprayer. FYI, Lowes has an in house brand of spray paint that is less than half of the cost of Rustolem. Only comes in gloss black or white, and is usually located on very bottom shelf. Good paint.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    Northern Florida
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    Spend the money. I wish I had figured that out about 50 years earlier. If it were a bigger job, that might be different.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
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    I have stated to many people in the past that I would rather have more time than money. Once time is gone, it's gone.

  4. #4
    I dread getting any of the sprayers out. For big jobs I dread the idea of not having a sprayer. I have been getting the big high performance rattle cans of Rust Oleum. Our welding shop keeps several colors in stock.

    https://www.rustoleum.com/product-ca...e-enamel-spray

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Kansas City
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    Time wins for me too.
    < insert spurious quote here >

  6. #6
    I have finally figured out which rattle can clear works for me on small projects. I have tried over 10 brands with prices as high as $25.99 a can. Minwax Clear Aerosol Lacquer, $10.97. For satin and semi gloss the rotatable spray tip puts on a mist so fine that rubbing is not necessary. With high gloss the orange peel is so fine that minimal rubbing makes it disappear. I am not sure about the durability yet. The next thing to find is an aerosol, high build, lacquer sanding sealer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Dad always said "Time or money; one way or the other, you gotta pay". Took me till I was about 40 before I really understood. There are a lot of things I can do. At nearly 70 I focus on the ones I want to do. If a little money shortens a task that I really don't feel like doing, I spend the dough. I even pay other people to do some things. I thought I was getting lazy but then realized I was just running out of time .
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


    Samuel Butler

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    66,365
    For small jobs like that, rattle cans are more cost AND time effective, IMHO. Heck, I keep a rattle can of shellac around for exactly that reason...if it's a big job, I'll pull out my shellac gun (my old Wagner HVLP), but for something small, rattle, rattle, squirt. I'd never use my gun(s) for oil based product anyway, so for metal, it's either rattle cans or a brush.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    I am about to try brazing a Schroder valve stem into the side of an aerosol can again. I had one for WD-40 years ago. Air pressure was provided by a bike pump only. A very tiny funnel was required for filling. I have used the little Preval sprayers. Economics and cleaning are an issue with those, they can however be very handy.

    https://preval.com/

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    I am about to try brazing a Schroder valve stem into the side of an aerosol can again. I had one for WD-40 years ago. Air pressure was provided by a bike pump only. A very tiny funnel was required for filling. I have used the little Preval sprayers. Economics and cleaning are an issue with those, they can however be very handy.

    https://preval.com/
    Ther are You Tubes showing how to refill aerosol cans, using a tubeless tire valve stem. You twist spray nozzle off, hold valve stem over top of can and apply air. I have a big can of PB Blaster that I have done so for years.

  11. #11
    normally use a spray gun. Just welded the broken off cub cadet muffler. Out of argon argh. Used a can of restolumn that was only here to black out a speaker baffle board before putting the fabric on.

    If something has to last I still have old epoxy primers from RM and Standox. Ive put the RM stuff on things even left outside and its lasted very well. I know its supposed to have a coating on it. NO comparison to can stuff and mixing up old school so its more important what the job is than if I use a rattle can or clean a gravity feed cup after. Its easy to do. I have a run off pail so gun flushed out the reducer just goes in the pail and is used for other stuff. Air cap and nozzle go in a small jar with reducer. I dont pull the fluid tips I just lightly brush and squirt reducer till the front end is clean then blow it dry.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    I am about to try brazing a Schroder valve stem into the side of an aerosol can again. I had one for WD-40 years ago. Air pressure was provided by a bike pump only. A very tiny funnel was required for filling. I have used the little Preval sprayers. Economics and cleaning are an issue with those, they can however be very handy.

    https://preval.com/
    Haven't used this, but it looks promising:

    https://www.amazon.com/Vaper-19419-S...ct_top?ie=UTF8

    Have been using one of these for quite a few years, along with a gallon of WD40. I got it to spray down a large sewer cable.

    https://www.amazon.com/WD-40-10-0043...s%2C194&sr=1-2

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Wood View Post
    Haven't used this, but it looks promising:

    https://www.amazon.com/Vaper-19419-S...ct_top?ie=UTF8

    Have been using one of these for quite a few years, along with a gallon of WD40. I got it to spray down a large sewer cable.

    https://www.amazon.com/WD-40-10-0043...s%2C194&sr=1-2
    While in college in late sixties, working in service station, we used a Vaper type can to spray both degreaser or tire cleaner

  14. #14
    The Schroder valve brazed into the WD40 can is an idea borrowed from Walt Gerard. His shop was neighbors with Dads shop. I have posted about him before. He still inspires me. I will keep posting this until he receives the Nobel Prize. Feel free to ignore.

    I've been thinking I'd like to start a bike shop," Walt said. He had met Ed Morton, a bicycle dealer who imported French Peugeot bicycles for his shop in Springfield - the new kind, with 10 speeds and hand brakes instead of gears and brakes in the rear hub.
    It was l967, about the time Walt entered the 11th grade at University High School. Walt was soon selling bicycles and supplies. He rented a vacant barber shop - complete with big "pump-up" chair and a pink lavatory in the sales room! That location is now part of Jefferson Junior High School's lower sports field. The bike business was booming. By l970, our friend Bud Stone helped Walt buy a lot on Rogers Street; he borrowed money for that and a new building. A few years later he rented a building in Warrensburg, near the campus of Central Missouri State University, and opened a second shop with Dave Erisman as manager.
    Walt and Dave, innovative bicyclists, saw the serious bicyclist's need for a device that would measure two things: miles per hour and cadence, to monitor the speed and regularity of pedaling. Walt and Dave set out to create a device they called "The Pacemeter." Most people understood the novelty of knowing how many miles per hour they were traveling, but some cyclists had discovered the advantage of humming a tune as they pedaled in time with the music.
    Walt and Dave planned for their Pacemeter to have two dials, a speedometer and a tachometer to register the rate and rhythm of pedaling. A glance at the handlebars would help the rider get "more miles for less muscle." For two years, Walt and Dave worked on the Pacemeter, often for hours at my dining table sketching designs for wiring, mountings for sensors and magnets, and designing the attractive black meter container for the handlebars. They "whittled" the final weight down to only 9 ounces! They let me test prototypes on my Peugeot bicycle.
    A representative of a widely respected British bicycle manufacturing company had planned to promote the Pacemeter to the industry. The young inventors borrowed money and patented the device, which sold for $70. But, at the crucial moment of placing it on the market, the prospective British promoter quit selling bicycles and went into tennis rackets! Walt and Dave had little money for national promotion but advertised briefly in a popular bicycling magazine. They sold Pacemeters to racers, Olympic trainers, summer camps for serious bicyclists and others, shipping them to 38 states. One morning, Walt received a call from a California fellow who was vying for the Henry Kremer prize - $87,000 for the first person in the world to invent a successful plane propelled by human power. It had to take off, clear a 10-foot pylon, fly a half-mile, turn around, return and land safely. Paul MacCready explained they were working on a human-powered plane and thought the Pacemeter could help them. They flew many unsuccessful trials, always improving the design and reducing the weight to attempt to earn the Kremer prize. A bicycle racer who weighed twice as much as the plane was set to try again in MacCready's "Gossamer Condor," a flimsy, 70-pound bird with a 96-foot wingspread. At 7:37 a.m. on Aug. 23, 1977, like a silent movie, the Gossamer Condor moved forward and lifted upward.It now hangs in the Smithsonian with the Pacemeter attached.

  15. #15
    That is a cool story and connection!

    I've had one of these kept filled with LPS #2 for a couple decades:
    https://sureshotsprayer.com/products...prayer-b8000pl
    They come with a whole bunch of nozzles and tubes in the kit.

    But i could not imagine it would be any more fun to clean paint out of one than a touch-up gun.
    Touch-up guns are better than rattle cans and relatively easy to clean. You can us higher solids content, too.

    I've re-purposed propane plumbing cylinder cans by welding or silver soldering ports or threaded fittings and such into them.
    They have thicker metal than a WD 40 can.
    Last edited by stephen thomas; 06-25-2024 at 11:27 PM.

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