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Thread: Just Bought A Ridgid Band Saw - BS14002 - Need Blade Advice

  1. #1
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    Just Bought A Ridgid Band Saw - BS14002 - Need Blade Advice

    This will be the one and only bandsaw in my shop. It did not come with a blade. I do not like changing blades. Thus, I would like to choose a blade (93 1/2") that I
    can leave on and use it for almost everything. I will not be re-sawing 12" wide hard maple, or making little doodads like on a scroll... so....just every day hobbyist
    band saw use. Thus the question: what blade (size and manufacturer) might be the "do all" blade I am looking for?

    I am open to get carbide tipped, if it is worth the extra money.

    Thanks for your help.

    Marc
    Sun City, AZ
    Marc
    Kenosha, WI

  2. #2
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    Nov 2009
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    Peoria, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Ward View Post
    This will be the one and only bandsaw in my shop. It did not come with a blade. I do not like changing blades. Thus, I would like to choose a blade (93 1/2") that I
    can leave on and use it for almost everything. I will not be re-sawing 12" wide hard maple, or making little doodads like on a scroll... so....just every day hobbyist
    band saw use. Thus the question: what blade (size and manufacturer) might be the "do all" blade I am looking for?

    I am open to get carbide tipped, if it is worth the extra money.

    Thanks for your help.

    Marc
    Sun City, AZ
    Hardwood or softwood? Exotic or domestic? How thick will the material be? How smooth of cut do you want? Changing blades will be a necessity whether you like it or not. Original blades are crap, so changing a blade will be necessary right away. Your decision will be whether to get a 1/4" or 3/8" and how many teeth. Choose one and wear it out, then be open for a different size if it doesn't work out. I use a 3/8", but it limits how tight I can cut a radius. That's why I have several different sizes. None are carbide.

  3. #3
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    May 2005
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    Richard, thank you. Maybe I will have to get over my blade changing phobia. That being the case, which ONE blade, size and manufacturer would you say I should look at, from your experience?
    Marc
    Kenosha, WI

  4. #4
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    I like Laguna or Timberwolf blades. I would say 3/8 for most work and a 1/4Ē for tight work. On my 14BX I use the 3/8Ē most of the time and occasionally a 1/4 or 3/4.

    Changing blades isnít that difficult, I just donít like to do it that often.

  5. #5
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    May 2005
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    Sun City, AZ
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    Michael, thanks. I can order Timberwolf on Amazon, so I will start with the 3/8....but now it seems like there are several 3/8 X 93 1/2 to choose from. There is the Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blade 93-1/2" x 3/8" x 3 TPI Alternate Set at $32

    and then there is the Timber Wolf Bandsaw Blade 3/8" x 93 1/2", 4 TPI at $27.00

    Marc
    Kenosha, WI

  6. #6
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    The higher the TPI the finer the cut, but you'll also need to consider the density of the material. For general cutting I prefer a 6TPI or higher, but if you're doing mostly resawing then 3-4TPI might be best. I have a 14TPI on mine but if I resaw I use a different blade.

    Some ideas:

    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/t...i-postive-claw
    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/l...-bandsaw-blade

  7. #7
    I have a 1/4" 6tpi Supercut on my bandsaw most of the time. It's my general use blade. Not particularly great at anything, but can do most things well enough. And it's cheap enough to be considered disposable, yet lasts long enough that I'm not constantly replacing it. If you just wanted one do-it-all blade, I'd recommend something along those lines.

    However, you'll likely find that you'll still need specialty blades for specialty jobs. You may want a thicker blade for straight cuts. A higher TPI for finish cuts. A lower TPI for thicker boards, etc. Not that it won't work in most situations, but sometimes you'll find you can save a lot of time and frustration after the cut by taking the time to install the right blade before the cut.

    I would start off with something like that and through your experience with that, you'll get an idea of what direction you should head in for your next blade purchase(s).

  8. #8
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    Carbide can be problematic on 14" saws if the forum posts about breakage are any sort of barometer. Too small a diameter maybe(?). Current users can probably correct or add credence to this. Less teeth equals less stress on the machine but a coarser cut result. It is a balancing act based on what you are trying to do. If you want a finished sort of cut for bandsaw boxes a thin kerf and lower tooth count could be your choice. If you want to push the saw to its capacity 2-3 skip tooth could be the one. Like with table saws, handsaws, and other tools the cutter matches the task or not to varying degrees of satisfaction.
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


    Ė Samuel Butler

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Timberwolf has a decent blade selection chart

    https://www.timberwolfblades.com/Blade-Selector.php
    When a glue bottle is open, your IQ drops 50 points. - Chris Schwarz, The Anarchistís Workbench

  10. #10
    I think it would help if we knew what exactly you were trying to do with this blade. Like hardwood, softwood, or both? What's your maximum thickness of wood you'll cut and what's the minimum thickness? What's the most common thickness of wood you'll be cutting? Are you doing mostly straight, mostly curved, or about a 50/50 mix of curved and straight cuts? Are you more worried about speed, versatility, or cut quality?

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    I have 3 types of blades on a 14" steel frame saw, 1/2" TriMaster (which a cast iron saw will not be happy with - won't tension it adequately and mucho $$$), 1/2" carbon steel 3 TPI and 1/4" carbon steel 6 TPI. If I were to only have one blade, I'd probably pick a bimetal, maybe diemaster 2, 3/8" either 4 or 6 teeth/inch. It wouldn't be great at anything but it'd be adequate for my common tasks. Bimetal blades are reputed to stay sharp several times longer than a carbon steel blades while costing not a lot more than a carbon steel blade. I have had good luck with Supercut Premium Gold 1/2" 3 TPI, they seem to stay sharp for quite a while. Do not however buy into their "carbide" claims; they're not what most think of as brazed on carbide teeth but rather they claim carbide particles in the metal that make up the band. As I said above they're good blades, maybe comparable to bimetal which SuperCut also sells but they're not carbide in the usual sense.

  12. #12
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    While I understand your desire to keep only one band on the saw...and it's certainly possible to use, say, a 3.8" 4-4 TPI band for general cutting, you are not going to fully realize the capability of your "one and only bandsaw" with only one band in your arsenal. For example, if you get into tighter scrolling situations, being able to drop down to a 1/4" higher tooth band (or sometimes narrower) is essential. And you need a spare for any bands that you like to use because, well...Murphy's Law still applies. It doesn't take a long time to change a band, either, especially if you have your saw tuned up and running correctly. For my 16" saw, I keep a 1.2" 3 TPI Lenox DiMaster 2 band on for general cutting but I rarely do any scrolling. Historically, I used Timberwolf bands from Suffolk Machinery, but recently decided to use the more durable DiMasters.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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