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Thread: LV Canvas chisel Gouge roll?

  1. #1

    LV Canvas chisel Gouge roll?

    Has any one tried the LV canvas chisel and gouge storage roll? Does meet your need?

    I think I need a storage solution somewhat safer than the drawer in my tool chest. I have a number of longer chisels stored in a shallow drawer, handles and blades alternating to save space. I have picked up more old chisels and as I get one cleaned up and sharpened, I try to find room for it in the drawer. Pushing chisels aside to make room for a pig sticker, my one crank neck chisel got me. Typing this with one finger as a result. To my credit, the chisel is sharp enough that I was unaware until I saw the blood dripping.

    I think groups of chisels bound together with some covering over the edges will be safer for my old hands. The leather rolls are nice, but I will need several and the cost of the rolls will easily exceed the value of the chisels enclosed. The canvas rolls are cheaper and appear to be a more cost effective option where the rolls will see light service in my shop.

    What am I missing?

    Pat D

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    445
    I’ve got a couple and think they are nice. They are well made and have good quality canvas. I haven’t put them to heavy use and don’t travel with chisels often, so it sounds like you are planning to use them the same way I use mine.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    27,754
    Blog Entries
    1
    My only concern with tool rolls is if they might retain moisture.

    Otherwise it is based on what works best for you.

    A lot of my chisels are in a couple of drawers. A bunch of others are standing up in wooden boxes with dowels running side to side and front to back to keep them vertical.

    Some folks like wall mounted racks to hold their chisels.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    I use a tool roll for my chisels - no problem with moisture but I'm in a dry area.

    Some of thoes canvas tool rolls only have pockets on one side. I much prefer the type with pockets on both sides - when you roll up the tools, the roll is fairly even. With the one sided rolls, you have a bulge on one side and nothing on the other.

    I also put my chisels into the rolls with the handles into the pockets and the edges exposed. The advantage is that you can see how big the edge is, and it doesn't cut a hole in the canvas roll (if you put them into the pockets edge-first).

    The disadvantage is the exposed edges and I've cut myself a few times.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #5
    I use a couple of these:

    https://hidatool.com/item/2336

    One is laid flat in a drawer, the other lives in the work truck, rolled and standing, cutting edges down.

    The retain moisture issue is very slight for me, in a not-humid area. I put wads of batting in the pockets which protects the leather from cuts, and retains the oil that is dripped in.

    It seems like canvas rolls would get cut up pretty quick unless done like Mike Henderson does, but neither the cutting edges or the flesh are very protected that way. I can see it for carving tools, which are hard to tell apart.

  6. #6
    I looked at those, but they look to be designed for Japanese chisels and would be too short. Most of my chisels are 10-12 inches long. I have ordered four of the LV canvas ones to try. I only wanted three, but if I ordered four I got free shipping that almost paid for the forth one..I will report back on how they work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Wood View Post
    I use a couple of these:

    https://hidatool.com/item/2336

    One is laid flat in a drawer, the other lives in the work truck, rolled and standing, cutting edges down.

    The retain moisture issue is very slight for me, in a not-humid area. I put wads of batting in the pockets which protects the leather from cuts, and retains the oil that is dripped in.

    It seems like canvas rolls would get cut up pretty quick unless done like Mike Henderson does, but neither the cutting edges or the flesh are very protected that way. I can see it for carving tools, which are hard to tell apart.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick C Daugherty View Post
    I looked at those, but they look to be designed for Japanese chisels and would be too short. Most of my chisels are 10-12 inches long. I have ordered four of the LV canvas ones to try. I only wanted three, but if I ordered four I got free shipping that almost paid for the forth one..I will report back on how they work.
    The larger size is 10 1/2-11" wide- the size of timber chisels.

    Good luck!

  8. #8
    I have one. It does what it's supposed to. I won't say it high quality, but it's good enough. I live in a high humidity region and pretty much any tool I leave out will rust, but the chisels in the roll haven't rusted yet. That being said, I keep the roll in a steel cabinet and only keep my best chisels in the roll, so I'm a little better about keeping them oiled before putting them up. But the chisels next to them in the cabinet that are hanging on a wooden holder do get spots of rust on them from time to time. So maybe they help prevent rust a little bit. Or maybe not. Either way, the canvas roll doesn't seem to promote rust.

  9. #9
    I have a Lost Art Press tool roll.

    https://lostartpress.com/products/lo...ress-tool-roll

    Cotton duck canvas with 18 pockets for chisels and other tools (up to 10 long). Well made, plain and simple. No cheesy Velcro. Does not require wi-fi.

  10. #10
    I have a cloth tool roll bought at the original Woodcraft over 40 years ago and a leather Lie-Nielsen tool roll. Both are used only when taking the tools somewhere to work or demonstrate. Otherwise the chisels or carving gouges or plane floats live in their racks. This means moisture is not a problem since my shop is dehumidified.
    Last edited by Dave Anderson NH; 06-17-2024 at 8:52 AM. Reason: fat finger misspelling correction
    Dave Anderson

    Chester, NH

  11. #11
    I have a canvas tool roll. I use it for traveling. I dislike it for normal use for 2 reasons: 1) it's dangerous with the edges up, but with the edges inside the pocket I can't easily see which one I want to grab, so I'm conflicted about how to orient them, 2) the roll gets opened on my bench - and even out of the way, it starts to collect dust and shavings so needs frequent cleaning.

    A roll is not as convenient as I thought it would be.

    Two things have worked well for me: 1) a hanging rack with holes. 2) a magnetic tool rack.

    I prefer the magnetic tool rack because it can store the chisels a little denser, and works well for alternate shapes and sizes. It also holds them a little more securely then the "hole rack" so I find I am less prone to touching the ends. I especially like it for my carving tools and gouges.

  12. #12
    My shop chisels are kept in racks, not rolls. Chisel rolls suffer cut too easily and the blades widths are hidden from view. Cloth tool rolls can promote rust also, so to me they are for transporting chisels only when necessary.

  13. #13
    My "shop" consists of a shop smith, used for drill press, lath and band saw, against the garage wall, six ft of shelving with a few power tools and supplies, a 6ft work bench that is rolled out for use and pushed back against the shop smith when not in use, and a large tool cabinet with all my hand tools. I do not have the luxury of wall mounted racks or tool cabinets. That capability went away in the great downsizing move.
    The first pic is my current chisel drawer. Eight more chisels are awaiting sharpening and handles. Once I get the rolls, I can move the lesser used chisels to a deeper drawer with some planes. If I get the chisels under control with the tool tools, the next issue is rational storage for my carving gouges, pic two. There are about 60 gouges in the yellow box and another twenty or so larger sized gouges and chisels in a wine box. Most are carving sharp.
    IMG_0639.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Patrick C Daugherty; 06-17-2024 at 5:14 PM. Reason: problem with photo load

  14. #14
    The wine box doesn't look too bad- you could cut it in half and make two shallower stacking trays...
    Last edited by Cameron Wood; 06-17-2024 at 9:45 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2023
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    31
    It sounds like you downsized your shop but not your hand tool collection. Do you use all of your chisels and gouges?

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