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Thread: Teak and Olivewood Jewelry Box

  1. #1
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    Teak and Olivewood Jewelry Box

    A while back, a friend gave me some reclaimed teak. Around here teak sells for almost $50/bd ft so it was a welcome gift. I made a few small things out of it but eventually built some jewelry boxes from the teak and some olivewood that I had.

    I didn't have a lot of teak left but decided to do one more box so I could take pictures and document the build. It looks simple but the build is long and detailed and you can see it here.

    Mike

    Teak-Box-150.jpg Teak-Box-153.jpg
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 06-11-2024 at 5:05 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  2. #2
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    250 views and not a single comment?

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #3
    OK, OK.....

    It is a beautiful box, great composition and execution.

    However, the thing that keeps coming back to mind for me at times over the past few days is simply puzzlement:
    How the heck did he make all those cuts and not a single one turned green?

    Do you just wait a few days before taking photos?


    smt

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    However, the thing that keeps coming back to mind for me at times over the past few days is simply puzzlement:
    How the heck did he make all those cuts and not a single one turned green?

    Do you just wait a few days before taking photos?


    smt
    I don't understand the question. Why would a cut turn green? Is it something about teak? This teak was quite old.

    Mike

    [Added note: I found that fresh sawn teak will darken with sun exposure but never experienced a color change like you described. below.]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 06-14-2024 at 6:32 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #5
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    Beautiful jewelry box, Mike.

    I don't understand the green comment either.
    Please help support the Creek.


    "The older I get, the better I used to be."
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  6. #6
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    I never saw the thread come up prior to now, Mike. That's a beautiful project!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Why would a cut turn green? Is it something about teak? This teak was quite old.
    Mike, sorry for the digression - you mentioned comments & it really was the thought that popped into my mind while reading your (excellent) build process because the effect is so common.

    Will have to get some really old stuff out of the loft and try it. Maybe that is the factor.
    I researched a bit on the web, and many descriptions, but few pictures. J. G. McIlvain goes on at length about it, but does not show green stuff - they show the stuff that ends up looking light and kind of trashy, then explain how to get it in the sun for a day or so to re-color it.

    I have not used a lot of teak, but have had to repair/restore floors from time to time.
    These very old parquets had ash cores and back, and rotted out in areas near an exterior door that were often damp:
    DSC_0002.jpg

    Most i have cut turns green - sometimes almost florescent.

    DSC_0004.jpg
    It can be a (thankfully, short) time nuisance getting it to blend back in.
    I used QS white oak for cores and backer. The flat sawn teak face(to match existing) is lower left corner
    A few days later:

    cores, face, & back, structural parquet, DO.jpg

    At least so the customer is not shocked.
    Can be seen in the far distance, still too light, but my buddy/flooring tech came along behind and sanded and blended in my repairs in several areas:

    Dumbarton install.jpg

    Last edited by stephen thomas; 06-14-2024 at 3:08 PM.

  8. #8
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    Mike, very fine box. And your build thread is fantastic. Excellent pictures and explanations...I am sure that took a lot of work. A great contribution to forum members. In drilling the holes for the hinges, you eye the center and use a sharp awl to mark the spot Have you used hex-shank centering bits and if so, how does that compare? Thanks for the educational post, Mark

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    Mike, very fine box. And your build thread is fantastic. Excellent pictures and explanations...I am sure that took a lot of work. A great contribution to forum members. In drilling the holes for the hinges, you eye the center and use a sharp awl to mark the spot Have you used hex-shank centering bits and if so, how does that compare? Thanks for the educational post, Mark
    I used a Vix bits to center the holes for the hinges on the box, itself. But on the top, I was afraid to use a Vix bit because the top is so thin - it's easy to drill all the way through. So I went with the Awl and by eye.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 06-14-2024 at 4:42 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  10. #10
    It looks really nice. All of the lines and joints look perfect.

  11. #11
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    Love the design, material selection and build execution!!! How did you decide these two wood species would look good together? I love the combination but always have hard time selecting complimentary woods.

    Thanks for posting!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Allen1010 View Post
    Love the design, material selection and build execution!!! How did you decide these two wood species would look good together? I love the combination but always have hard time selecting complimentary woods.

    Thanks for posting!!
    Partially just good luck. I lay the wood next to each other to see what it might look like, sometimes even putting alcohol on it to see what it might look like finished.

    If I build it and decide it doesn't look good, I either gift it or throw it away and never speak further of it.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  13. #13
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    It is a handsome looking box Mike.
    The woods compliment each other nicely
    Thanks for sharing with us.
    Aj

  14. #14
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    That should make more than a few people happy over multiple generations!

  15. #15
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    Very nice. I did not know teak could look that good. Can you talk about the finish? I've used olive wood several times, but haven't figured out a good finish for it.
    < insert spurious quote here >

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