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Thread: Project: Combination Kitchen Island/Eating Table (Build)

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    66,328
    I didn't spend a lot of time in the shop this afternoon, but tackled something important. If you recall, this sucker is going to be living in a "really tiny" studio apartment. While the normal seating is two, adding the leaf makes it workable for four folks to eat together or play cards or whatever. But what to do with the extra seating in a space that barely fits what's already there? I picked up a set of four folding 24" (bar/counter height) stools off Amazon. They are Cosco brand, which is well known and makes decent quality folding tables and chairs, etc. The idea is that 1), it gives the Chitlins' seating from the start so they don't have to rush out and find seating off FB Marketplace or wherever and 2), to ascertain if there's a way to store two folding seats under the table on the backside of the island cabinet. I'm happy to report that the folded stools are "this much" (a very small amount) short enough to be hung for storage. Oh, happy day! Here's a decent photo of one of the 24" high stools with our kitchen counter for reference. (They are surprisingly comfortable, padded seats)

    IMG_7482.jpg

    So today's task was to "have a hangin' " by making a couple of wood brackets that the seats would hook over and hold securely. Some scrap 30mm thick walnut from the leg offcuts were perfect for the task, so I rough ripped a piece at the bandsaw and cleaned that up with...a hand plane. Gotta use ALL the tools, you know. Ran a rounded groove in the piece at the router table and then cut off two pieces with angles to create what was needed. They are narrower at the 'hook' end away from the case so they capture the edge of the round seat bottoms more securely. After testing with just screws, they were glued in place and "better" screws will complete things after finishing.

    IMG_7485.jpg IMG_7484.jpg

    After all of this, the back of the cabinet and the bottom of the sides got a first coat of black paint. Those areas are meant to "disappear" visually once the whole thing is in place and ready to use. No photo of the paint...trust me, it's black.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    66,328
    Yesterday, I worked on some decorative elements that I'll go into later as previously promised. Today it was all about milling material and gluing up panels for the cabinet doors. Basic, but essential work.

    IMG_7495.jpg IMG_7496.jpg

    I did have to take a detour later in the day to work on cleaning out a clog in the DC filters...that was NOT fun...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #48
    I don't know what I'm more envious of, all that nice walnut or all those nice clamps...

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    N CA
    Posts
    1,309
    Jim, I have enjoyed following you on this build and it looks terrific. As a G700 owner and appreciating how thorough you are did you take pictures of the “not fun” task too?

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    66,328
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I don't know what I'm more envious of, all that nice walnut or all those nice clamps...
    LOL..."back in the day" I took advantage of many sales on prices that were remarkably lower even at list price at that time. And yes, I have "run out of clamps" more than once over the years.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    Jim, I have enjoyed following you on this build and it looks terrific. As a G700 owner and appreciating how thorough you are did you take pictures of the “not fun” task too?
    I'll be talking about that in my original G700 thread, but no, I didn't take photos. I was "not in the mood" given how difficult the task is. I really like the system for all my tools...except the jointer/thicknesser...and now that I'm using my new shop more fully, it's time to consider if I need to make a change due to the shop size as well as for other factors. No question, the G700 is a kick-butt DC, but it may end up being an interim solution simply because I really feel I need a larger system to properly service my ductwork and tools.

    Now today was spent working on a repair to my espresso machine and that was nearly as "fun" as the G700...but not nearly as, um...dirty. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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