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Thread: Bit stuck in impact driver

  1. #1
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    Bit stuck in impact driver

    The bit is solidly stuck in my Ryobi impact driver. I've been online and seen some YouTubes and other suggestions and getting nowhere. It's a double-ended bit like you use in a screwdriver and that's probably part of the problem. Looking in the back of the chuck I think you see the tip of a Phillips bit at the base of a cone-like recess. Supporting the chuck on a vise with the collar held out and whacking the bit with a punch did nothing.

    An online parts source lets you search for parts based on what your problem is and lists the most common problems. For this tool over 75% of the problems are stuck bits. But you can't buy the whole chuck assembly and I don't see how to dis-assemble this one any more than it is.

    Any suggestions? This isn't the greatest impact driver but it has worked for me and I'd just as soon not buy a new one.
    PXL_20240608_163903027r.jpgPXL_20240608_163940731cr.jpg

  2. #2
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    Is the collar jammed?
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  3. #3
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    Have you tried applying a little heat just above the collar?
    Ken

    So much to learn, so little time.....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Is the collar jammed?
    No. The twisted wire is holding it firmly forward.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    Have you tried applying a little heat just above the collar?
    No. Do you mean on the bit? Seems like that would only make it swell, if anything. I can try it.


    The next thing I was going to try is a bigger hammer, but I'd like to find a better solutioin.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Rutherford View Post




    No. Do you mean on the bit? Seems like that would only make it swell, if anything. I can try it.


    The next thing I was going to try is a bigger hammer, but I'd like to find a better solutioin.
    No, I agree, don't put heat on the bit. I meant on the body of the tool just above the collar. It might help to heat the collar too.
    Ken

    So much to learn, so little time.....

  6. #6
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    Try a variation of Ken's suggestion, put the whole thing in the freezer for an hour, then apply heat with a heat gun to the chuck.

  7. #7
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    Have you tried grabbing the bit with a pair of vise grips and twisting the bit back and forth? I've had worn bits rotate slightly in the chuck and get jammed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Have you tried grabbing the bit with a pair of vise grips and twisting the bit back and forth? I've had worn bits rotate slightly in the chuck and get jammed.
    That made so much sense I took it out of the freezer to try it but it didn't work. Also tried gripping the bit next to the collar and using the collar as a fulcrum.

    Back in the freezer.

  9. #9
    The first thing to do IMO, is to clamp the bit in a vise and impact it in reverse.

    Then use a wrench or something to fit against the chuck and pound on that so the force is away from the bit and toward the tool.

  10. #10
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    Freezing and heating didn't do much, even with a bigger hammer. It's like beating on a solid chunk of metal. I'll put it back together and try Cameron's suggestion.

    It's hard to imagine how this chuck is constructed that it worked to hold a cylindrical bit not just well enough to drive screws, but this tightly.

  11. #11
    It seems unlikely that the chuck would be open to the clutch area so that you would see the bit from inside.
    If that were so then grease would come out and dirt would go in.

  12. #12
    Here's a pretty good Youtube that might help.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dt0ld4uu5Ds

  13. #13
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    That is good video, kinda surprised though that he didn't have a pair of snap ring pliers to remove the snap rings.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    That is good video, kinda surprised though that he didn't have a pair of snap ring pliers to remove the snap rings.
    Yep ..took only one time removing a snap ring the way the video shows...and awaaaay it goes....then I promptly got a pair of snap ring pliers.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.

  15. #15
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    I work with a group of volunteers that build access ramps for people who need them. A stuck bit is fairly common. We find the cure is to tap the bit against something solid like a p0st. Then put the driver in reverse. Finally grip the bit with your fingers and gently press the switch while holding the bit. This works about 90% on the first try. Most of us use Dewalt impact drivers. YMMV!

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