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Thread: Cabinet making

  1. #1

    Cabinet making

    How hard would it be to make this cabinet. Average woodworking skills.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Central TX
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    82
    The basic construction looks pretty straightforward (normal cabinet design) but the carving and turning is more advanced if you want to replicate it exactly. Also, are you wanting to make it a speaker cabinet? The speaker in the cabinet pictured is retrofitted, and if I was starting from scratch I'd make sure the speaker cab design was solid and then add ornamentation, etc. to make it look how you want. Speaker cabs are subject to vibration so need to be very solid, and there's also considerations for the baffle design and placement, back design, cab dimensions, etc. that all influence the sound, and you also need to consider the speaker size and type you're planning to use in that equation.

    TL;DR and IMO - cabinet construction - intermediate, turning and carving - advanced; if you want it to be a speaker cab then redesign the construction and add the aesthetics back in as you want/can.

  3. #3
    what type of connection should I use to connect the 1x's to the legs?
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
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    In that design the legs go all the way to the top. the rest look to be mortise and tenon.

  5. #5
    what type of connection should I use to connect the 1x's to the legs?


    It sounds like you might be approaching this from a limited equipment & experience standpoint?
    In any case i would strongly urge "traditional method - mortise and tenon"
    The number of tools necessary to acquire to do it effectively is minimal and minimal cost; big advantage is that M & T is the correct method and a relatively easy basic skill to acquire and build.

    If you are just climbing the tool acquisition curve and need to be reminded "Every project is just a reason to buy more tools" then some will recommend a domino or gang drill dowel machine.
    Cheap and dirty, as for a stage prop = Kreg jig and deck screws.

    Good luck!
    smt

  6. #6
    I also need to put a concave profile into the top of the leg. Can I use to different size spade bits?
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave oneill View Post
    I also need to put a concave profile into the top of the leg. Can I use to different size spade bits?
    Absolutely use the largest first just be very careful. Feed slowly. Forstners are better but a spade works in a pinch.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    444
    I’d recommend Illustrated Cabinetmaking as a reference book. It has drawings of all the typically-used joints and a good discussion of when and where to use them. It then has examples of different types of furniture and different options for joinery.

    It isn’t a book of plans, but I find it a very helpful reference for when I’m designing something and am deciding what joinery I want to use.

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