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Thread: Bought a water pump

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Bought a water pump

    Thinking about the electric lawnmower thread, I decided to put this in a new thread. This out to freak Doug out. I have a 2 acre point on the lake that we are getting ready to be able to rent for weddings. I want to get grass growing on it like Augusta National. To do that, it needs an inch of water a week. So I bought this water pump off Facebook Marketplace.

    It has a Crysler 360 V8 and the plan is to use two fixed water cannons to put a half inch on the whole 2 acres in about 15 minutes. It was cheap, but I'm sure it needs a lot of work. The old guys who sold it used to use it to water 26 acres of tobacco. It will be a project for this Fall.
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  2. #2
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    You could start your own local water company with that "tiny" pump, Tom...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    I'm curious - won't that give the fish and bull frogs a thrill?
    "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." - John Lennon

  4. #4
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    Austin, TX
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    Now that's a pump!

  5. #5
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    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Your laws allow that ? You would be shutdown in a heartbeat in the west for stealing water.
    Bill D.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    I'm curious - won't that give the fish and bull frogs a thrill?
    To answer that question, I plan to use one of these fish safe self-cleaning intake strainers. It requires 42 gpm to operate. This will be the most expensive part of the system.

    https://sure-flo.com/strainers/self-cleaning-strainers/
    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-04-2024 at 12:13 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Your laws allow that ? You would be shutdown in a heartbeat in the west for stealing water.
    Bill D.
    No laws, but the power company that operates the lake used to have a 2" pipe size limit for any individual's intake. Virginia Beach started pulling a million gallons a day out around 1994. It made no noticeable difference whatsoever, so they dropped that individual requirement.

    I'm only taking 27,000 gallons at the time. I can take it in 10 or 15 minutes through an 8" intake, or take much longer with a 2" intake. The amount of water would be the same. Water runs out of the ground around here every few hundred yards. Farmers pull water out of the river all up and down it with no worries to the river. There is no major population pulling water out of it other than Virginia Beach.

  8. #8
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    Two of these will cover the whole point and still drop some water back in the lake. One on a fixed post on the right hand side a couple of hundred feet from the end of the point, and the other going up beside the gable end peak on the bathroom house towards the middle third of the point. The one on the fixed post will be set to a half circle and the house mounted one a full circle. The one in this video is not using one of the larger nozzles available for this rain gun.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?

    I wanted a gasoline motor instead of a diesel because I think I can quiet it down a lot easier.

  9. #9
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    Jun 2004
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    Burlington, NC
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    Tom, what kind of grass are you planning to use?

  10. #10
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    This. Oasis Bermuda. I have it started down there, but waiting on rain is not going to work.

    https://www.outsidepride.com/seed/gr...ass-seed.html?

    Augusta National overseeds their Bermuda with Perennial Rye every Fall. It's not perennial down there and wouldn't be here either so they topdress 600 pounds per acre every year. The green you see during the Masters is the Ryegrass. Bermuda stays brown in the dormant stage here from Thanksgiving Until late Spring. We probably won't be having any renters in Winter anyway, but if there is a demand I can always overseed if called for.

    Bermuda is very hardy here, can be cut very short, and is very wear resistant so we can park a lot of cars on it and it will survive.

    In the distance pic you can see the color of the new grass, but up close it's having a hard time. I have some compost to top dress it with but feel like it mainly needs water right now until I can get into the top dressing. The point is a lot bigger than it looks in the picture. It's 600 feet long. The second picture is just the end of it.
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    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-04-2024 at 1:09 PM.

  11. #11
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    Some types of rye grass are often used as a cover crop by some farmers. It can trap nitrogen and phosphorous in the soil to the benefit of other crops to follow.

    Ryegrass can have many benefits, depending on the type of ryegrass and how it's used:

    Soil health: Ryegrass can improve soil structure and organic matter, and help prevent soil erosion. Its large root system holds soil, while its shallow, dense roots improve water infiltration and tilth. Ryegrass can also help the soil retain moisture, especially in the fall and winter.

    Nutrient management: Ryegrass can capture and store nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil, preventing nutrient runoff. When the ryegrass is killed, it releases these nutrients back into the soil, which can benefit the following crop.
    Weed suppression: Ryegrass can help suppress weeds.
    From a search of rye grass benefits.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #12
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    We generally just use Annual Rye for cover crops and to help prepare the ground for another type of grass planted in Spring. There are quite a number of perennial rye grass types, so ones like the combination used at Augusta National are chosen for the color and type of surface they provide. As you might expect, it's probably the most expensive variety.

    Even though it would be perennial farther North and come back every year, down here it will die in hot weather and not come back, but it's still called perennial rye grass because it is some places. Annual rye is a Lot cheaper.

    We also let the Annual grow long and after the hot weather grass is sewed it's cut and left to help hold seed in place and moisture under it much like covering new grass seed with straw. I had a good crop of Annual down there this past Winter that helped a lot, but it still needs a great deal more water.
    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-04-2024 at 2:00 PM.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    We generally just use Annual Rye...
    Sounds like you have a plan, but just in case.... You might take a look at buffalo grass; one of several types native to the high plain's short-grass prairies. ...Wonder how it would do in the East w/ some water?

    I started some via plugs in the 'way-back' acreage at a previous TX house. It was in the middle of a drought when it went in, but it survived and was still doing OK when we sold. The variety I used - developed by Texas Tech IIRC - is called "Turffalo": wear resistant, drought tolerant (::zero water once established), fine textured and spreads by runners (like Bermuda), and it grows to 4-5" tall and stops (no mowing required). Last I looked it was comparatively expensive, but if you're in no hurry you can plug it every 3-4'.

  14. #14
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    Never heard of it used here or ever even heard of it. Too much effort into this to experiment and time lost is money not earned. I know how to grow Bermuda and what it does.

    This is a picture of volunteer Bermuda, but I have no idea how many years it took to get to this.

    Around here if it's growing where you don't want it to grow it's called "Wire grass". The nearest High School football field was planted by the school kids. They were told to save all the wire grass that was pulled out of their gardens one Summer and bring it to school. It was all piled in one end zone. One day the whole school went out and plugged the sprigs into the ground. I was told that was in the late 1930's. That's the same ball field and grass used today. Any bare ground will eventually be taken over with it here.

    I took all the Pine trees, Hickory trees, and Sweetgum trees off that point and lost a lot of the topsoil in the process. That didn't help, but I'll get it back. I've had it since 1977 but we never did anything with it until a few years ago. We originally thought we'd build a house on it, but have too many animals near our house in the woods a couple of hundred yards away to keep down there, so our plans for it finally changed.
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    Last edited by Tom M King; 06-04-2024 at 4:59 PM.

  15. #15
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    Nice view. Brian
    Brian

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