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Thread: Osage Orange

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    3,840
    I donít see how Osage could be a good tone wood. When I was making the canes I remember it had layers of hard sandwiched between soft spongy fibers. A lot like Douglas fir.
    It does look nice a lot of compromise are made when something looks so good.
    I would like to see pics of the lumber that started this thread.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  2. #17
    That's a beautiful guitar.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    That's a beautiful guitar.
    It is not a guitar, It is a Cittern, Bouzouki, or very long Octave Mandolin.

  4. #19
    Years ago after reading about Osage orange , I finally found a few pieces . One thing I havenít seen mentioned here is that some of the
    old books say itís really durable , even stuck in the ground .

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    66,386
    Osage Orange might very well have some interesting sound characteristics. Keep in mind that it was heavily used for bows (as in bow and arrow) with a nickname "bois d arc" or something like that. But I also suspect it might be hard to work at the thinness required for sound applications, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,484
    It's a beautiful instrument but I can promise you it's not a bouzouki.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    It is not a guitar, It is a Cittern, Bouzouki, or very long Octave Mandolin.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kananis View Post
    It's a beautiful instrument but I can promise you it's not a bouzouki.
    Mandocello, I see it now.

  8. #23
    But I also suspect it might be hard to work at the thinness required for sound applications, too.


    Oxidized on left, machine jointed on right

    DSC_0638.jpg

    Bring your widebelt sander, if possible!

    Or a scraper &/or high angle plane

    DSC_0634_01.jpg

  9. #24
    It is actually a very good tone wood. Similar to Brazilian Rosewood in both use and tone.

    The reason you don't see it used often is because it isn't commercially produced in numbers. It would probably be a very expensive wood if it were in demand. That, and it's color isn't very attractive to most people. Now, a lot of people will say it's hard to work, but in the world of musical instruments where stuff like highly figured maple is common, I wouldn't think it to be considered so. Just hard to find, and especially in the sizes required.

  10. #25
    If the wood given to the Nephew can yield a back and side set for a Guitar or mandolin the BF price goes up exponentially. It needs to be quarter sawn or as close to quartered as possible. The ability to process it thin is where value is added. A few banjo makers use it too.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/17590156078...xoCROwQAvD_BwE


    Screen Shot 2024-06-05 at 7.49.47 AM.jpg

  11. #26
    Sorry about my photo choice of the mandocello. The top and finger board are the only parts not made of osage. I thought I had a different view.I will have to find another photo. You are looking at Sitka and rosewood.

  12. #27
    The mandocello was several computers ago - can't find any other images. Here's an osage music stand:

    osage music stand.jpeg

  13. #28
    The Mandocello is a beauty. A Mandocello can be a formidable beast with a wicked sound. Attending a Mike Marshall concert is on my to do list. Making a music stand for our son is on the list too. I had our son look at Bradley Grey's sands. He said "Wow! Nice! Yes please!"

    I made a few of these KATY railroad commemorative hat racks from osage orange and spikes salvaged from cleaning up along the KATY trail after floods. This piece is also about the diameter and type of cut that a long bow could be made from.
    + The osage stem and keel of the row boat. It is the most durable wood I know of.

    IMG_2025.jpg IMG_2024.jpg IMG_2026.jpg
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 06-07-2024 at 8:40 AM. Reason: image

  14. #29
    I got to play Mike Marshall's mandocello many years back after his performance with the Modern Mandolin Quartet in Cincinnati. It's part of a set made for the quartet by John Montelone - along with 2 mandolins and a mandola

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley Gray View Post
    I got to play Mike Marshall's mandocello many years back after his performance with the Modern Mandolin Quartet in Cincinnati. It's part of a set made for the quartet by John Montelone - along with 2 mandolins and a mandola
    What a neat story! It confirms my impression that Mr. Marshall is a very pleasant and approachable guy. He also has a sense of humor. I like his video about the Mandocello.


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