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Thread: Ah,my kinda old Craftsman 14" Bandsaw.

  1. #1
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    Oct 2007
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    Ah,my kinda old Craftsman 14" Bandsaw.

    A survivor. Old being relative. Late 90's buy.
    Seems it is a model number that is not as mainstream. 113.248340 Taiwan. cast iron frame, table.
    ordered new poly tires and Carter guides. Not particularly inexpensive lol.
    wish me luck haha. Because there is that upper wheel bearing and tension spring thing IIRC.

    ugghh.. edits.
    Last edited by George Speed; 06-01-2024 at 2:29 AM.

  2. #2
    Before The world wide web, Lowes, Home Depot, and Payless Cashway there was Sears. Our store was very handy, close by, and open evenings.
    The quality and availability of woodworking tools and equipment has really changed over the years. When I was a little nipper Dad fell for a tool offer in the back of a woodworking magazine. Send in $250.00 to be included in a shipment of fine Shapers, Planers, Table Saws, Band Saws and Sanders. The ship never came in. Dad reported the fraud to the authority's. Nothing ever came of it. He is still sore about it.

  3. #3
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    Late 1990s machine is a survivor? I started woodworking in 1972, 1980s was about the time I stopped shopping at Sears. In the 1990s, they started doing single year contracts on machinery, so every year could be a new manufacturer. Cheapest won, quality went to heck!

  4. #4
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    Bandsaw survived my bad habits haha

  5. #5
    I have a Minimax 20 inch bandsaw and got really tired of changing blades. I found an old Craftsman 12 inch bandsaw, bought it, fixed it up, and now use that for narrow blade detail work. That way, I can leave a wider blade in the MM 20. The Craftsman bandsaw works well for my needs. I don't know how old it is but the motor on it is obviously old.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #6
    A lot of the splayed leg, made in who knows where, stuff is really bad. Remember the "Exact-I-Cut" yellow plastic disc in the circa 1978 table saw? Or the cable drive saw from 1987 or so? OP's band saw looks decent. There were a few years when "Professional" grade was offered. 113.248340 looks like one of those.

    https://www.manualslib.com/manual/49...13-248340.html

    Screen Shot 2024-06-03 at 6.26.08 PM.jpg

  7. #7
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    Might as well order new bearings throughout! I am thinking she will sing sweetly

    Now to consider blades, lol! There was a popular vendor so many years back..

    highland to the rescue I do believe. Aha there is also Timberwolf still alive.

    Samantha Fish on the Pioneer TT -- American Dream. Yes Ma'am!
    Last edited by George Speed; 06-03-2024 at 9:01 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Speed View Post
    Might as well order new bearings throughout! I am thinking she will sing sweetly
    If you are going to do the work to replace at least one bearing, especially on a "new to you" machine, IMHO, it's worth just doing them all. Not only will the machine benefit from all new bearings, but it gives you the opportunity to fully clean and adjust everything to "like new" specifications as much as possible including replacing any dubious fasteners. It's also a good opportunity to touch up or fully paint while it's torn down.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Speed View Post
    Might as well order new bearings throughout! I am thinking she will sing sweetly

    Now to consider blades, lol! There was a popular vendor so many years back..

    highland to the rescue I do believe. Aha there is also Timberwolf still alive.

    Samantha Fish on the Pioneer TT -- American Dream. Yes Ma'am!
    My assumption is that bearings would be the last thing you'll need for it. Bandsaw bearings should live forever. They just don't see high loads and a bandsaw just isn't run for hours at a time. Of course someone will say they run theirs for 8 hours at a time, but I don't see a Craftsman bandsaw being set up for hours of resawing.

  10. #10
    I have never had bearing problems on a bandsaw, including the very old Craftsman with Babbitt.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    I have never had bearing problems on a bandsaw, including the very old Craftsman with Babbitt.
    lol! Babbits are nice. Live near a Babbit producer. Only the upper wheels inner race was showing/can feel the wear. Inexpensive cost, and they were easy to get out.

  12. #12
    I would never change a bearing until the old one it is known to be bad. The run-out can be measured, you can listen to them with a stethoscope or stick, you can check to see if one is running hot. To do a proper job replacing bearings you need a press and a bearing heater. The bearings in the 113.248340 will be made in Taiwan. If you do not do very careful shopping any new ones you find for it will be made in China.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    I would never change a bearing until the old one it is known to be bad. The run-out can be measured, you can listen to them with a stethoscope or stick, you can check to see if one is running hot. To do a proper job replacing bearings you need a press and a bearing heater. The bearings in the 113.248340 will be made in Taiwan. If you do not do very careful shopping any new ones you find for it will be made in China.
    In this case the press fit is not overly tight, no heat needed - to remove. The opposite might not be true! Unlike the Bultaco Motor that went into the oven lol!
    One of my neighbors has a large press in his shop or used to....
    Last edited by George Speed; 06-05-2024 at 10:40 AM.

  14. #14
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    Progress
    Overall cleaning.
    New tires on wheels. Bearings on top wheel done. (lower wheel ok).
    Guide post and the cast iron part it was in, all cleaned up...it was a mess. long neglected.
    Carter guides installed.
    Cast iron top assy is still off. I hope to have it cleaned up next weekend.
    I doubt I can get it looking like new, haha. But any improvment is welcome.
    For the past many years it has just been used to cut Aluminum, whatnot and etc.

  15. #15

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