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Thread: WoodRiver Side Rabbet Plane

  1. #1
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    WoodRiver Side Rabbet Plane

    The Woodriver Side Rabbet Plane is on sale at Woodcraft for $69.99 down from $99.99. I was wondering whether anyone on this forum has bought this plane and likes it.

    The WoodRiver Side Rabbet Plane takes itís linage from the Record 2506S and incorporates two manually adjusted blades and an adjustable depth stop. This handy tool is perfect for cleaning up rabbets and grooves, ensuring a proper fit. The planeís precisely machined body is manufactured from 40cr tool steel with a reversible, adjustable depth stop and features T10 steel blades hardened to RC 59-63. The front of the plane is easily removable for conversion to a bull nose configuration for corners and stop dados.

    I would be using the plane to clean up glue in the corners of small boxes that I make and cleaning up rabbets and grooves.

    Thanks for information on this plane as the sale ends May, 31st.

    Roger in Texas

  2. #2
    I have one of those. I don’t use it often, but when I need it I’m glad to have it. To me, it’s worth $70 for those rare occasions.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    ďIf you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.Ē

  3. #3
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    The design looks a bit different than the Record Side Rabbet.

    Record #2506 > https://www.record-planes.com/record...-rabbet-plane/

    The #2506s has an added depth stop > https://www.record-planes.com/record...-rabbet-plane/

    Wood River > https://www.woodcraft.com/products/w...e-rabbet-plane

    The Wood River appears to have much shorter blades. The design may also make it more difficult to set the blades to depth. A part of the "two in one" design not to my liking is the depth stop can only work on one side at a time. Having to fiddle with the depth stop all the time would get old fast.

    The Stanley design of the #79 and the #98 & #99 side rabbets are more to my liking. It is quite often that when one is needed, both are needed.

    There is someone making (3D printed, iirc) angled depth stops for the #79 to use when making sliding dovetails. My recollection is Derek Cohen made such an adapter for use on a #79 many years ago.

    Too bad no one has copied the Preston #1369.

    Preston Side Rabbet Plane.png

    That one has blade adjusters.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Always wanted a Preston.
    But the only one i ever saw in the wild.....was priced like it was the only one left in the wild.

    I have the Stanley 98/99 and would hate to be without them.
    Lots of use fitting millwork, perhaps especially on site.

    Per OP & the Woodriver plane - i can't find anything that shows how the blades fit, (dis-assembled, e.g.) or what the back side or depth gage looks like?
    Using a side rabbet to clean glue in box or frame corners is not something i ever considered, and i (used to) do a lot of that work. Will have to try it next time.
    Thank you for the notion!

  5. #5
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    Using a side rabbet to clean glue in box or frame corners is not something i ever considered, and i (used to) do a lot of that work. Will have to try it next time.
    A shoulder plane that can be turned into a chisel plane may be better suited for such a task.

    Stanley #90.png

    The top can be removed to allow this with Stanley and some other shoulder planes.

    For myself, a chisel or scraper works well for cleaning up a glue line.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
    A shoulder plane that can be turned into a chisel plane may be better suited for such a task.


    I think i probably tried that a few times with one of the tiny little bullnose planes. Maybe, very early on, and it was not efficient.
    Keep meaning to get around to making something like in your photo for various uses, or a shoulder plane. Or maybe even clone the Preston.
    There always seems to be something else in the queue ahead of it, though.

    I see a lot of your posts i'd like to compliment, but this forum does not have a like button, so have to save it for times there's more on my mind to say.

    smt

    Last edited by stephen thomas; 05-30-2024 at 8:47 PM.

  7. #7
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    Lee valley also has a side rabbet plane. The below link has an informative video about set up and use.

    https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop...e?item=05P4401

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the kind words Stephen.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
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    Someone on ebay is selling printed angle pieces for the Stanley 79. If I was going to buy a new one, it would probably be the Lee Valley one. When I sharpen the irons on the 79 that I bought new, and other such small cutters, I turn the water stones up on edge and just use the sides of the stones rather than wearing the larger faces with such small cutters.

    I have the small Record shoulder plane that converts to a chisel plane, also bought new, but I don't believe I've ever had the front off of it.

  10. #10
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    I had a Lee Valley version in my shop for a while. It’s extremely fussy to set up.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    I had a Lee Valley version in my shop for a while. It’s extremely fussy to set up.
    To me it seems the "fussy to set up" problem is caused by holding two blades with one fastener.

    The #79, 98 & 99 are a bit fussy to set without an adjuster, but not extremely fussy.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post

    The Stanley design of the #79 and the #98 & #99 side rabbets are more to my liking. It is quite often that when one is needed, both are needed.


    jtk
    Agree 100%. I have a Stanley #79 with depth stop (early versions donít have one) and LN #98/99. Interestingly, although designed for the same task, sometimes one variation is more suited to the procedure than the other. Iím not ready to offload the #79, but Patrick Leach has one listed on todayís tool list.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Rosenthal View Post
    Agree 100%. I have a Stanley #79 with depth stop (early versions don’t have one) and LN #98/99. Interestingly, although designed for the same task, sometimes one variation is more suited to the procedure than the other. I’m not ready to offload the #79, but Patrick Leach has one listed on today’s tool list.
    My first #79 was sold years ago thinking the #98 & 99 was good enough. A few years ago my second #79 was purchased.

    Just goes to show, "sometimes one variation is more suited to the procedure than the other."

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
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    Thank you all for your responses.

    I decided not to buy the side plane.

    Roger
    Last edited by Roger Davis; 06-14-2024 at 2:54 PM.

  15. #15
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    I'm a bit late here, but a little info ...

    I have, and use, the Veritas, Lie Nielsen and Stanley side rabbet planes ...



    The Veritas is based on the Preston ...



    ... and the one I reach for most often as it has good registration, is the most comfortable to hold, and is so quick to flip blade direction.

    The Lie Nielen duo work just as well, and I would argue that their longer blades are easier to sharpen and set up.

    The Stanley is dedicated to sliding dovetails, and I have two fences with different angle ratios for this task. In fairness, HNT Gordon was the first to do this.





    I have an article on the Stanley conversion here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...Stanley79.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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