Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Stick chair

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Central TX
    Posts
    82

    Stick chair

    This is the curved Irish-inspired chair from The Stick Chair Book with a few design tweaks. It was fun to build and a little tricky in some places; I think switching to 3/4” tenons (instead of 1”) would make things easier and it’d still be plenty strong. It was also my first time using linseed oil paint, which has a beautiful tone but is definitely harder to work with than more common paints.

    It’s comfy! Good reading chair.

    49493C4A-390A-4B72-9B3F-8A6FCA46C7E5.jpg F1B75252-9F98-41E0-9212-FD3626C44FB8.jpg
    Last edited by Daniel Culotta; 05-27-2024 at 7:56 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western U P of Michigan
    Posts
    115
    Daniel
    I bought that same book last fall and you have inspired me !! Beautiful Chair !!
    Chris

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    445
    That looks good! Glad to hear you like it. Something similar is on my list to build too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N of DFW
    Posts
    59
    very elegant !

  5. #5
    Looks great! I have some oak drying to make one myself soon. Any advice you would pass along from your experience?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Central TX
    Posts
    82
    I've made a few chairs now and they're fun! Do it. For this one I would change all of the 1" stick tenons to 3/4". 3/4" tenons are more than strong enough, and 1" tenons leave very little meat on the arm in some places after drilling which can magnify slight misalignments and lead to cracking during assembly. That'll probably be the main change when I make this one again, and I think it'll make it easier.

    The backrest is a lot of wood to shape with a spokeshave after you bandsaw it, especially the inside of the curve. Not really any way around this - just be prepared.

    I'd have at least one construction laser on hand if you don't have a spotter (a cheap one is fine). The short sticks have some funky angles and it's nice to have the laser set on one while you draw in sight lines or eyeball the other.

    I used the Veritas tapered reamer and tenon cutter - makes the legs very easy. I'd go with that over the straight tenons if you haven't made a chair before.

    I really like the look and feel of the linseed oil paint, but be forewarned it has zero flattening properties, so what you see off the brush is what you get. I had to be way more meticulous about aligning brush strokes, tipping off, etc., and there were still a couple of spots that are a little sloppier than I'd like. Not super noticeable in the finished piece, but just something to be aware of.

    Have fun with it and riff on the design as you go. I used tapered legs, added the undercarriage, played with the back stick height, changed the hands, etc. It's easy to try new things and make small tweaks to fit your preferences.

    Enjoy it!

  7. #7
    That's all helpful! Some of those changes I was planning to make already so it's good to hear a second opinion. I'm using riven oak. I eyeballed the splits and I'm not going to be able to get 1" out of many of the sticks. A lesson for next time.

    I also really like the tapered legs and planned to do that as well. It's good to see it with the undercarriage. I think these low chairs often look heavy with the undercarriage but in the pictures you posted I think it looks just right.

    Thanks again for the advice!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •