Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Just Plane Abuse

  1. #1

    Just Plane Abuse

    Between laying the floor and deciding on the tile product, the specs changed from 1/4" thick to 10mm thickness.
    Where it would have been easy to match the heights flush (but there were concerns about tile thickness in large format); now every 1/16" counts.
    I think just knocking the high areas and ridgelines down flat saved more than 1/16", probably 3/32".

    DSC_0131.jpgDSC_0133.jpgDSC_0134.jpgDSC_0140.jpgDSC_0143.jpg

    "Mommy, what does obsessive mean?"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    9,251
    Been there. I don't do varying height floors, thresholds in doorways, nor curbs for showers. At least wood is easier than concrete. This was to replace a fiberglass shower in a 1974 tiled bathroom with a tile shower with new floor meeting old tile floor perfectly flush. Hand tools were 20 pound sledge hammer, and carbide tipped stonework chisels with two pound hammer.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tom M King; 05-17-2024 at 12:38 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Dayton Ohio
    Posts
    1,000
    Just think how difficult it would have been if you didn't have the hand tools. Lot of work but worth it. Looking good so far.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    4,654
    Stanley #74 would have been the answer, my knees and back ache just thinking about hand planing a floor.

  5. #5
    My back hurts just seeing the pictures. Nice job though!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    27,645
    Blog Entries
    1
    You're a younger man than I Mr. Thomas.

    Great looking workout and work.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    9,251
    I didn't see knee pads in the picture. I expect they were on the photographer.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Mid West and North East USA
    Posts
    3,137
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    I didn't see knee pads in the picture. I expect they were on the photographer.
    Had the same thought. I hope there is some Advil or Tylenol close by too. That is an impressive project!

  9. #9
    Thank you for the supportive and nice comments, guys!

    Stanley #74 would have been the answer,


    Always wanted one of them with the handles!
    Used to scour Old Tool Journal when it came in the mail, and see if there were any on the auction. Several turned up over the course of most years. In that crowd, though, there was always a floor to the market & none ever went for what i could afford. Martin Donnelly's annual extravaganza used to have all kinds of deals on all kinds of planes at live auction. Saw many things you never see in the wild, often cheap Unfortunately AFAICR, no #74's ever turned up there.


    I've actually had to plane (& scrape) a couple floors after repairing them. Sanding not allowed.
    And the scraping was not the modern travesty of gouging and scarring. It was scrape (or plane) smooth, handsanding, even ROS ok to blend.

    You're a younger man than I Mr. Thomas.


    You are probably right, but possibly not by much.

    smt
    Last edited by stephen thomas; 05-17-2024 at 5:37 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Connecticut Shoreline
    Posts
    341
    NIce work!

    I once had to flatten a particle board underlayment in a living room that crowned up along the center joist by about 1/4-inch to 3/8-inch prior to laying a click lock vinyl floor, that couldn't accommodate more than 1/8-inch deviation in 10-feet. So I laid out beams an inch thick on the the center high spot and shimmed the ends level. Then I ran a circular saw sitting on the beams that cut flush with the floor at the ends and cut in 1/4-3/8 deep at the center crown. I cut these about 3-inches apart the length of the room (21-feet). Then out came the jack plane and cut away until the cut line disappeared. I had to stop every few lines and sharpen the blade. A coarse grit sanding disc smoothed out the jack plane tracks well enough. It took the better part of a weekend and was among the more painful woodworking experiences I ever had that didn't involve falling off a ladder.

    It came out great and the finished floor looks good! By now I've pretty well put the experience out of my mind and forgotten just how awful an experience it was!

    Until I read your post...

    Thanks! ;-)

    DC

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •