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Thread: Big chisel contest

  1. #1

    Big chisel contest

    My entry:

    11 1/2" long, 1 7/8" wide, just under 15 oz.

    IMG_4980.jpeg

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    16 1/8" long with no handle, 3 3/8" wide, and weighs 4.0 pounds
    IMG_3261.jpg

  3. #3
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    Not sure how long this one is overall.

    Big Bopper Meets Big Chisel.jpg

    My recollection is the hunk of wood is 10" wide. The chisel is a 2" Stanley. The handle was made from a table or chair leg years before my acquisition of a lathe.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Thinking the term does or does not include slicks?
    BIG Chisels,SMC.jpg
    And maybe not from the realm of Timber Framers?


    Shorty is 11" long..and a mere 1-1/2" wide...
    Big Brother..is 15" long, and an even 2" wide

    others in the shop?
    Big Chisels, Ready for the big job.JPG
    1" gouge, 3/8" Timber Framer Chisel...7/8" Corner chisel...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  5. #5
    I think the “slicks” are 3 inches wide or more.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I think the “slicks” are 3 inches wide or more.
    In my research on them, it mainly depends on the manufacturer, some are anything over 2".

    Here are a few of mine, mostly 2" ones, 1" corner, the one in front is 1.25"

    IMG_1178 (600 x 400).jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I think the “slicks” are 3 inches wide or more.
    I knew there would be a "slick" discussion, but the rules of the contest were quite nondescript. LOL

    Carpenter’s Slick


    A carpenter’s slick is a type of chisel used with two hands to pare long surfaces of wood following the grain.
    https://shilohmuseum.org/?s=wood+slick





    Last edited by Richard Coers; 05-15-2024 at 11:32 AM.

  8. #8
    A slick is by definition a "big chisel" so included, but I think we are talking about woodworking so not stone chisels, cold chisels, air tool steel, etc..

    Richard's 4 lb in the lead, but maybe refine to sharp, working condition...

  9. #9
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    Mine is actually a Stanley 2" (most likely 700 series) chisel. Found another image.

    2 Inch Chisel.jpg

    As mentioned earlier the handle is not the original. The original was one of the red shellac handles common on some Stanley chisels. The handle on this chisel was made from a salvaged furniture leg.

    The metal of the chisel is about 9" long.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 05-15-2024 at 2:22 PM. Reason: The metal of…
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #10
    A slick has rocker.
    Backside is not dead flat, as a chisel's should be.
    Even though the socket is essentially inline with the blade as a chisel's would be, it should be possible to pare with good control, flat side down, even when your knuckles are over the flat surface being pared/planed/slicked.
    (IOW, Ignoring cranked paring chisels)

    smt

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Slicks and could be argued if chisels or not, but not the biggest anyway. This is a bit of an unusual use and used cross grain. In fixing up this old dock, at this step the new deck had been put on aligned to strings pulled tight. The old bands were plenty good enough to leave for this purpose but not the finished look we wanted because they were so wavy and crooked. They were straightened by kerfing with a chainsaw just eyeballing the kerfs to the new deck edge, and clearing out the noggles with the slicks. There were a couple of timber framing chisels out there too somewhere in that picture that were used with the mallets. The slicks were to finish. One is a razor sharp Japanese one and the other rougher work one a USA one. That gave me a flat, straight surface to mount the new bands on. The slicks are laying out with the big mallet in the farthest pile.

    I mostly use the 2" slicks and only very rarely use the 3-1/2" one.

    I use them often cross grain, sometimes pushing with my hip and in this case fist against chest, using body weight.

    Edited to add just about the dock-made it handicap accessible with its own parking spot too. Grass growing there now-that was the day I made the grading change.

    dockstraightenedge.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tom M King; 05-15-2024 at 9:48 PM.

  12. #12
    Not the biggest, but the biggest I have. A 2" Buck Bros paring chisel and 3/8, 1/2, 5/8 framing chisels. The 1/2 is a Douglass and the other two are Crossman. The Buck, when I got it still had the original 20 degree grind on the bevel. Like a lot of old Bucks, it had two big chips on the edge. When I cleaned up the chips, I reground the bevel to 25 degrees. Hopefully the edge will hold up better.IMG_0575.jpg

  13. #13
    Nice looking tataki nomi. Who is the maker? Pic of the stamp?!

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Kwong View Post
    Nice looking tataki nomi. Who is the maker? Pic of the stamp?!


    IMG_4981.jpeg

    This was part of a mixed lot of tools that I got recently. There appears to be a fracture in the cutting edge, which hasn't affected the light use it's gotten so far.

  15. #15
    Wonderful. I can't make out who the maker is but the sign above it signifies that the smith was apart of the Tokyo Chisel Group. It's likely white #1 steel and very hard. Very nice chisel - I'm jealous!

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