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Thread: Should I replane three week old edges before glue up?

  1. #1
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    Should I replane three week old edges before glue up?

    I got delayed doing a bench top glue up by about three weeks, now I'm wondering if I should replane everything to get a fresh edge before glue up. I did a little water test on the old edges vs a freshly planed edge , I didn't notice much difference. What is considered a fresh edge for glue up? Thanks
    Blood will flow when flesh and steel are one - Sting

  2. #2
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    If the material is straight and flat, there's no real reason to take off more material prior to your glue-up. If the material has moved since you last milled it, then yes, correcting those issues prior to glue and clamps is a "darn good idea".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    To test a panel joint, I slide post it notes between the joint at various points and then dry clamp them with "moderate force". If I can't pull any out, I consider it good.

  4. #4
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    Use winding sticks on the top and edges, then check those two are square.

  5. #5
    I've glued up wood that wasn't touched in years before. And it held fine. So long as it hasn't warped, and you didn't put a finish on it, leave it outside to collect dust and calcium deposits, or something else to impede the penetration of the glue, it'll be fine.

    Oxidized wood still glues up just fine. I've even use potassium dichromate to simulate 100 years of oxidation before applying glue.

  6. #6
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    What kind of wood?

    If it isn't a species that is very oily you should be fine without planning the edges again. If it is a species that is oily wipe the edges with acetone before gluing.
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 05-09-2024 at 4:57 PM.

  7. #7
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    I'm gluing hard maple, no need for acetone on the edges. In the past I had a joint fail in Osage wood. should have wiped the edges with acetone then!
    Blood will flow when flesh and steel are one - Sting

  8. #8
    If the glue joints are structurally important, re-prep and glue. There is a giant difference in glue joint strength between freshly machined and old wood, even with the same geometry.

    If not, meh. Just make sure they're clean and well fitted and off you go.

  9. #9
    Hereís the pitch ! Unless the material has pitch , I would Ďbe sure Iím right Ö. then,go ahead !

  10. #10
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    Following up on my post, I did the glue up without replaneing the pieces. I'm going to guess that three weeks of oxidation or case hardening on the edges is not enough to significantly affect the joint strength of the PVA glue. If I learn otherwise I'll post about it.
    Blood will flow when flesh and steel are one - Sting

  11. #11
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    It's really not. As long as everything was square when you put it together, you'll be fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth Moar View Post
    Following up on my post, I did the glue up without replaneing the pieces. I'm going to guess that three weeks of oxidation or case hardening on the edges is not enough to significantly affect the joint strength of the PVA glue. If I learn otherwise I'll post about it.

  12. #12
    Iíve used acetone , but Iíve been told it has some oil in it ! Pretty sure the info was good , and MEK is probably better. But havenít
    had any failures using the acetone . Probably wonít need any more at my age .

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I’ve used acetone , but I’ve been told it has some oil in it ! Pretty sure the info was good , and MEK is probably better. But haven’t
    had any failures using the acetone . Probably won’t need any more at my age .
    Paint thinner/mineral spirits, particularly of lower quality, often contains some oily substance. But acetone? Acetone dissolves oil, so this seems like misinformation.
    -- Jim

    Use the right tool for the job.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Morgan View Post
    Paint thinner/mineral spirits, particularly of lower quality, often contains some oily substance. But acetone? Acetone dissolves oil, so this seems like misinformation.
    Just googled and it says itís derived from oil. The guy I worked for was careful about the big jobs , he had to be extremely
    careful with specifications. I think a call to an Acetone manufacturer would confirm his caution.

  15. #15
    We use acetone in my industry as a cleaning agent and as a solvent for the analysis of organic compounds.

    Acetone contains no oil. It may be derived from petroleum, but the final, reacted product does not contain any oil - and by oil I mean any hydrocarbon that won't readily evaporate and will remain on the wood, making the finish hard to bond to the wood.

    Acetone is extremely volatile (this makes it flammable, and bad to breathe, but also evaporative). It is often used to dissolve surface oil and dirt so it can be easily wiped off. It is unique in that it is a very good solvent for both "oils" and "water based products", and evaporates quick and completely at room temperatures. These things make it great for removing dirt and impurities, but damaging to your body and finishes.
    Last edited by Prashun Patel; 05-20-2024 at 9:17 AM.

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