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Thread: Outdoor Oak Table

  1. #1

    Outdoor Oak Table

    Im going to build some outdoor white oak tables for my daughter. They will be 12 in diameter and 1 3/4 thick. I'd like to put some sort of a lip around the perimeter to prevent glasses etc. from sliding off.
    The first thing that comes to mind is to rip a piece of oak 2 wide & 1/4 thick and apply it around the outside edge. Im afraid that approach is destined to fail due to expansion/contraction of the 12 slab.
    Any other ideas to achieve my objective?

  2. #2
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    Use a router and create a pocket with a bowl bit.

  3. #3
    Remember that any lip will hold water in. You don't want that. I think it might also be worth reviewing expectations and designs regarding cupping and warping of a solid 12" wide top. Outdoor things move a lot, if for no other reason than they get soaked with water on one side (the top) and stay dry on the other (the bottom.).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by John C Cox View Post
    Remember that any lip will hold water in. You don't want that. I think it might also be worth reviewing expectations and designs regarding cupping and warping of a solid 12" wide top. Outdoor things move a lot, if for no other reason than they get soaked with water on one side (the top) and stay dry on the other (the bottom.).
    I assumed the OP knew this or said table is under complete coverage and only subject to temperature swings. I agree though, it isn't something I'd normally do, but that's why I suggested what I did since it will be the most durable besides not doing it in the first place

  5. #5
    Thanks John & Michael for your feedback. I like the idea of routing out a pocket but I think John’s point about water collection would rule out this approach. My understanding is that these tables will be uncovered. The issues of warping, splitting, etc. were also in the back of my mind. I have some 8/4 teak but I suspect this option would still present the same challenges.

  6. #6
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    I would make several curved rails and attach them to the circumference with some stainless screws through the railing through a spacer and into the edge of the table. Make the railings in segments to avoid seasonal dimension changes. There would be a lip and no water retention.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA '71
    Go Navy!

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  7. #7
    Nice idea Lee. I’ll rough out a prototype and see how it looks.

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