Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 43

Thread: Is there a small, accurate table saw?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Moscow, Idaho
    Posts
    302

    Is there a small, accurate table saw?

    I need to downsize my hobby woodworking shop a bit, and would like to have a table saw that is smaller than a cabinet saw with the extension table. Is there a smaller table saw that would still be as accurate as a cabinet saw? Most of the smaller saws are jobsite saws, and they don't seem to have a reputation for being especially accurate. Is there a better options?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    1,238
    Iíve used this one and I was somewhat blown away at how great it felt when operating.

    https://www.festoolusa.com/products/...50-us#Overview

    I also know people on YouTube have had great success with the DeWalt line, but Iíve no experience with any of the newer models.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    5,601
    I suggest you consider simply taking the table/wings on your cabinet saw, as the footprint isn't much bigger than a benchtop. This also leaves you options for later.

    You could even rig fold down wings since the saw would be more stable/sturdy than any jobsite saw.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  4. #4
    I have a Dewalt 7491RS jobsite saw. I removed it from the folding cart as I don't have any desire to "put it away" and built a sold stand for it. I am not an advanced wood worker by any means but it's been workable for me in very small shop. The fence is pretty solid. The table top is some kind of synthetic and definitely not metal or magnetic. The miter slot is a bit weird - you'll definitely want a better miter gauge and one that is easily adjustable for fit. (You may already have that if you're downsizing). My biggest complaints about it are a) very little room on the infeed end so it can be very challenging getting a long piece started. Also the adjustment for blade angle for miter cuts is stiff and has no "micro adjust" - you have to push it pretty hard to set the angle, making it very challenging to dial in a perfect angle. I wish that setting used a wheel like the depth setting. Other than those issues, I've found it very serviceable for my needs. Wish I had the space for something larger, but right now, I don't.
    Tamar at 3x3 Custom has a nice video about how she managed with one of these for a long time till she got a full-sized table saw.
    https://youtu.be/22oqr6o5z-w?feature=shared

    Hope that's helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    682
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    I suggest you consider simply taking the table/wings on your cabinet saw, as the footprint isn't much bigger than a benchtop. This also leaves you options for later.

    You could even rig fold down wings since the saw would be more stable/sturdy than any jobsite saw.
    I think this is an excellent idea to consider.

  6. #6
    I have one General 350 no wings. I agree with that as well. I cant stand all those light saws. Last used a ridgid whatever full size thing at a job site. It worked and even surprised me. Cant say anything much I like about it rather have a cabinet saw with some weight and no wings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    1,002
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    I suggest you consider simply taking the table/wings on your cabinet saw, as the footprint isn't much bigger than a benchtop. This also leaves you options for later.

    You could even rig fold down wings since the saw would be more stable/sturdy than any jobsite saw.
    Doing that would actually create a smaller saw than any job-site saw with the motor hanging out the back, retain the accruacy and most of the mass. And...give one the opportunity to put the wings back on --OR-- add a great cross-cut sled when needed. Removing only the left wing and shortening the fence rails could still provide probably 12" to 24" rips (plywood) and not be a larger footprint than most any job-site saw.

    If you truly want to go small, and could live with the reduced cut depth, Byrne gets very high marks from model makers. byrnesmodelmachines.com However, Jim Byrnes passed away last fall and i don't think they are back to selling new machines yet, so the used market may be the only market for a Byrnes saw.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    10,232
    Sears sold a 8"? tablesaw in the 1950's. Much smaller footprint. Seemed well made. There is a printers type saw that folks convert to a wood working saw.
    BILL D.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/12612025729...SABEgJmq_D_BwE

    https://www.briarpress.org/27948
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 04-20-2024 at 6:01 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    1,405
    Scraped a couple of those 8" saws twenty years or so ago. Could not give them away. Dad inherited them in the 60's
    Ron

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    66,202
    Michael identifies one of the most accurate small table saws going at present from Festool. I does have limited rip capacity so combining with a track saw and parallel guides for wide rips is necessary, but the small sliding table is the bee's knees for accurate and safe small parts production, too. For a more "traditional" saw, some folks like the DeWalt with the better fence. If you will still have 240v power, the deal of removing the extension wings and using short fence rails on your existing saw has merit, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Mid West and North East USA
    Posts
    3,217
    Blog Entries
    3
    There is Micro Mark If you want to go real small. My small saws are a Ryobi and an antique Wards Powercraft.

    https://www.micromark.com/mini-power...aws/table-saws

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    4,679
    Another vote for Festool. An amazing little 33 pound machine. Blade tilt is -10 degrees to plus 47 degrees, miter gauge mounted on a sliding table that will make you squeal with delight on how smooth it is, adjusts from 0 degrees to 70 degrees. Nearly dustless and cuts as smooth as a Forrest Woodworker II with the stock blade. I had always wanted a Bryrne modeling saw, but with Jim's passing the company is in a bit off kilter. Pretty certain you can't even order a new saw right now, only accessories. An amazing machine for picture frames! Sure the price of the Festool stings a lot, but darned if you don't smile every time you use it.
    Last edited by Richard Coers; 04-20-2024 at 10:48 PM.

  13. #13
    I believe this is considered the Rolls Royce of small, light table saws now: https://www.timberwolftools.com/mafe...-pull-push-saw

    B
    https://shorturl.at/mRTU3

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    1,186
    Quote Originally Posted by brent stanley View Post
    I believe this is considered the Rolls Royce of small, light table saws now: https://www.timberwolftools.com/mafe...-pull-push-saw

    B
    xxxxxxxxxxxx
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.Ē

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    7,327
    Blog Entries
    7
    The Erika tablesaws look impressive. My Ulmia tablesaw has a push feature, and double miter, it makes life easier for mitering.

    Also the Erika cuts 2-13/16 or 3-5/16” depending on the model. The festool cuts 1-11/16, so it’s not cutting 8/4 material.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •