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Thread: Is there a small, accurate table saw?

  1. #16
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    Jan 2016
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    Port au Port, NL, Canada
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    I have an old (1940's) Delta 1160 tilt top saw that I like which is solid, accurate and very smooth. Another more resent choice is the Inca 259 with the mortising attachment, I never used one but past reviews were very favourable.

  2. #17
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    Dec 2008
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    I used a new Bosch saw the other day, with a fold up stand, not mine. Was skeptical as I generally have a low opinion of job site saws, and I was impressed. was just pine, but the cut was as smooth as my slide saw! Did a couple of deep cuts and it seemed to have plenty of power. Fence was fine. Saved me from running back to the shop.

  3. #18
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    Mar 2010
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    Franklin, Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Edgerton View Post
    I used a new Bosch saw the other day, with a fold up stand, not mine. Was skeptical as I generally have a low opinion of job site saws, and I was impressed. was just pine, but the cut was as smooth as my slide saw! Did a couple of deep cuts and it seemed to have plenty of power. Fence was fine. Saved me from running back to the shop.
    I have used one for years, and am very pleased with the results. My workspace is a garage that we actually use to park our cars, so the ability to fold up my toys and put them away trumps all of the advantages of a bigger saw. Still, combined with a tracksaw, I have built plenty of projects, and never really found a cut I couldn't do.

    I am, however, contemplating selling it and getting the similar Sawstop model, for the safety feature. (But, that's a different thread entirely! )

  4. #19
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    Mar 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    I'm restoring a 1938 Craftsman 8" cast iron body table saw. It came with removable wings. Here's a photo of the machine (not mine). They come up for sale in better condition than this rusty one.
    Screenshot 2024-04-21 at 7.13.35 PM.jpg

    And here's a link to a restored version
    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot....aspx?id=36593

  5. #20
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    Nov 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gibney View Post
    I'm restoring a 1938 Craftsman 8" cast iron body table saw. It came with removable wings. Here's a photo of the machine (not mine). They come up for sale in better condition than this rusty one.
    Screenshot 2024-04-21 at 7.13.35 PM.jpg

    And here's a link to a restored version
    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot....aspx?id=36593
    I have something similar in the shed. I plan to set it up as a dedicated 1/4" dado. Mine is a really neat little saw but the arbor tilt does not tilt the motor so its usefulness is limited. The little Power Kraft has the same flaw with the tilt function.

    Screen Shot 2024-04-22 at 8.39.22 AM.jpg
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 04-22-2024 at 9:47 AM.

  6. #21
    If you can find one, an extremely accurate - and heavy - small saw is a Hammond Glider. These were originally meant for cutting lead type for printing presses. I have a model G4 (there are a half-dozen or more models) and it can routinely cut accurately to a thousandth of an inch. There are quite a few people on Old Wood Working Machines that have them and there are threads about maintaining and converting them. Takes about a 7" blade with a unique three bolt pattern around the arbor - Forrest can configure blades for them. Craftspeople that build wooden puzzles go crazy over these things at auctions. You can also find them on CraigsList for little money on occasion.

    These are obviously meant for small scale work and cutting small parts though I have seen people ripping long 1Xs and cutting up half sheets of plywood on them. Those operations seemed dicey to me, however.

    Here is a brochure on four of the G series:

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=21520

    Here is a guide to rebuilding a G100:

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=29988





  7. #22
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    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    10,137
    The horrible fright mini tablesaw is bad, floppy, et..
    Bill D

  8. #23
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    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    1,394
    You can buy a new arbor from Peter Harrison for the Hammond TrimOsaw that allows the saw to take a 5/8" arbor sawblade.
    https://www.instagram.com/peter_harr...p/C4OP7IsLtF7/

    I bought one but haven't fitted it to the saw yet.

  9. #24
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    Feb 2009
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    Cedar Park, TX - Boulder Creek, CA
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    861
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Another vote for Festool ... Blade tilt is -10 degrees to plus 47 degrees ...
    I did not know that. Pretty sweet for sure.

    Martin, or Altendorf, does +- 45 or more?

    I remember looking for pic's as to how, but don't remember if I found anything.

    'We' had ... maybe still have (Dad's garage) an 8" Craftsman on a pretty nicely designed and built stand that doubles as a dust bin. I kinda remember doing some nice work on it.

    I had a Dewalt portable. It had a couple little quirks, like a hollow in the die cast table that really only mattered on small pieces. Built a nice bench with it, a circular saw, and a borrowed 4" jointer. All used on my knees on the floor ... no bench ...

    And...

    I was waiting for the Hammond to be mentioned ;-)

  10. #25
    Another mention of the Delta 1160 saw. Compact, and quite capable (except for the tilting table, and lack of dust collection).

    eafdb50a6a2db8e53f6f489e5248b717-1.jpg

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
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    957
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    I suggest you consider simply taking the table/wings on your cabinet saw, as the footprint isn't much bigger than a benchtop. This also leaves you options for later.

    You could even rig fold down wings since the saw would be more stable/sturdy than any jobsite saw.
    I think this is a great idea. Spacewise the saw without wings is likely to have about the same footprint as a jobsite saw. Plus, your existing saw is likely to have a bit more power than a jobsite saw and probably a greater distance in front of the blade (which is significant when ripping).

    However, if you need the ability to fold the saw up and move it out of the way, then a jobsite saw on a foldup stand would have some advantages. I own a Sawstop Jobsite saw. It's very accurate. It easily folds up and to allow storage out of the way when not in use. It has plenty of power (although not likely as much as a cabinet saw). It's one drawback for me was the miter gauge which I replaced with an Incra miter gauge/sled kit. Of course, you get the safety of the Sawstop saw also which I feel is significant.

    The Festool CSC SYS50 is a great saw and appears to be highly accurate. However, it seems as if it would be necessary to purchase it with the portable stand to make it versatile enough to be replace a cabinet saw which brings the price to $2,000. It's probably not as powerful and lacks a little bit in the table size department compared to your current saw. It does have a lot of excellent features which make it a great saw. I've only seen in-person demos, but I think it's possible the miter gauge setup may not be quite as accurate as an Incra gauge on a regular tablesaw. (I'd research that before I'd buy.)

  12. #27
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    Apr 2017
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    Southwest US
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Grass View Post
    I did not know that. Pretty sweet for sure.

    Martin, or Altendorf, does +- 45 or more?

    I remember looking for pic's as to how, but don't remember if I found anything.

    'We' had ... maybe still have (Dad's garage) an 8" Craftsman on a pretty nicely designed and built stand that doubles as a dust bin. I kinda remember doing some nice work on it.

    I had a Dewalt portable. It had a couple little quirks, like a hollow in the die cast table that really only mattered on small pieces. Built a nice bench with it, a circular saw, and a borrowed 4" jointer. All used on my knees on the floor ... no bench ...

    And...

    I was waiting for the Hammond to be mentioned ;-)
    I have the 10" 7480... it still has the dip in it near the throat plate (top is aluminum).
    Not a problem when using a Crosscut sled. Problem is when doing thin rips
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.

  13. #28
    drop a sheet of quarter inch ply with a stop block front and back on the table saw. Turn your blade up through it and thin rips are fine.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Mid West and North East USA
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    The Delta Homecraft 8 1/4 inch is another nice vintage option. These had a drill press and jointer that shared the same motor. I have the drill press set up on its own. I regret giving the jointer away. I am on the lookout to replace the jointer and set this back up as original.

    DSCN1890.jpg DSCN1889.jpg

    http://vintagemachinery.org/photoind...l.aspx?id=3754

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=...AAAAHQAAAAAQCQ
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 04-23-2024 at 11:31 PM.

  15. #30
    I picked up a DeWalt DWE7491RS last year to use as a jobsite saw while residing my house. I am actually quite impressed with it. It is a far better saw than my dad's 1956 Craftsman 9" saw that I learned on and used until I was nearly 30. Between my dad and I, that 9" saw made a lot of furniture.

    And with an actual riving knife and a semi-usable blade guard on the DeWalt, it probably is safer than my 1986 Unisaw (which the Unisaw reminded me of a couple months ago. Kickback hurts!). I didn't do much crosscutting on it with the miter gauge, but I rarely crosscut on a table saw in general.

    I would miss the power of the Unisaw, but if I absolutely had to, I probably could get by with the DeWalt. It wouldn't be my first choice, but it would be a workable one.

    Acme even has them on sale now

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