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Thread: Shop tidbits...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
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    Shop tidbits...

    A few weeks ago, the mowing season began here. While in the shed, I was looking for something and checking the open containers on the bench in there and I noticed a right-angle adapter. Looking at it, I couldn't figure what it fit. I put it back into the container and continued the search for something relating to the first mowing of the season.

    For years, I have had a slow leak in my air and air compressor system. Keeping in mind, I am deaf hearing with a cochlear implant and a hearing aid, I couldn't determine where the leak was originating. Thus I got in the habit of turning off the air compressor daily. Then one day last week, I wanted to bleed off the air pressure quickly, so I pulled out on the ring for the safety overpressure valve. That bled off the pressure quickly and I reset it. Since then, I have turned off the air compressor with for example 105 psi and the next morning found the same or nearly the same pressure when I came into the shop. Before, 2-3 hours after I shut the compressor off, it would bleed off all the pressure.

    The week prior to that, I was gluing up the field boards for the dining table I am building. I joined the boards using biscuits. I noticed in the case for the biscuit/plate joiner a right-angle adapter. Imagine my surprise I found that it could replace the dust bag. Using an adapter from my Bosch ROS, I was able to connect the biscuit joiner to my shop vac! Amazingly cleaner cutting the biscuit slots with it connected to my shop vac!

    This afternoon, it dawned on me, I saw the same adapter in the container on the bench in the shed. The only two woodworking tools in my shop that have ever resided in that shed are my Ridgid TS and my PC8529 router. Could it be? I went to the shed, grabbed that adapter and went to my shop. Sure enough! That is the same adapter used on the biscuit/plate joiner and it fits my router. Now I look forward to routing the tenons for the breadboard edge on the field of the dining table!
    Last edited by Ken Fitzgerald; 04-03-2024 at 9:17 PM.
    Ken

    So much to learn, so little time.....

  2. #2
    I know what you mean Ken.

    I was at the cottage for the past 3 days thinking when I get home I need to start tuning up that old plane the I got years ago from who knows where. Well I pick it up and it has some rust pretty much everywhere. I run it on the edge of a piece of walnut and it cuts a perfect shaving. Go figure!

  3. #3
    I most too often find forgotten items in the shop. What really excites me is when I discover another use for something other thsn intended purposed.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Mid West and North East USA
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    I sure can relate. It takes so much "stuff" to have a shop and dreams of doing things. Keeping track of it all is a big job. Your dining table with breadboard ends is going to be a fun project!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    66,036
    Always a good day when some little mystery gets solved!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    4,603
    I swear everyone has their own little Bermuda Triangle. Items disappear and suddenly pop back out in plain sight!

  7. #7
    I recently gave the nickel shop tour to a maker of Uillean pipes. He recounted making a clever jig for a specific part and deciding to store it in a place that he would remember in his cluttered shop. When he opened up the drawer he found an earlier version of the same jig which he had forgotten about.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Southwest US
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    I swear everyone has their own little Bermuda Triangle. Items disappear and suddenly pop back out in plain sight!
    I have at least a half dozen Bermuda Triangles --aka Wormholes-- in my house.
    Set "thing" down right next to me, go to pick it up, it's gone... nowhere to be seen. Turns up a week later in part of the house I seldom visit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    I recently gave the nickel shop tour to a maker of Uillean pipes. He recounted making a clever jig for a specific part and deciding to store it in a place that he would remember in his cluttered shop. When he opened up the drawer he found an earlier version of the same jig which he had forgotten about.
    ^^^^ THIS too ^^^^.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Great Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    235
    On occasion I find a simple jig or fixture I made and cannot for the life of me remember what it was for. All jigs and fixtures now get a piece of blue tape with a clear identification of what project/process it is for. Small stuff goes in a baggie with a note. I also now take pictures of the setup on the tool/machine in question with the jig and work piece in place. Those pix are all downloaded and filed in folders for each project.

    Getting old is not for the weak or faint of heart.

    TB

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    When St. Anthony fails to help me find things I resort to blaming someone for borrowing or stealing the item. I usually find the thing, right where I left, it not long after making the accusation. I lost the special long wing bolt that holds the blade guard on the vintage Sears radial arm saw. I searched for that for several years. Here is what the old shop looked like on the day I found it.
    DSCN0335.jpg

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    When St. Anthony fails to help me find things I resort to blaming someone for borrowing or stealing the item. I usually find the thing, right where I left, it not long after making the accusation. I lost the special long wing bolt that holds the blade guard on the vintage Sears radial arm saw. I searched for that for several years. Here is what the old shop looked like on the day I found it.
    DSCN0335.jpg
    I have never accused anyone of nicking tools but when I lose them and then find them in the place I am sure I looked twice I have a strong suspicion that someone is messing with me.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
    Posts
    1,668
    Those relief valves, like the ones on water heater, are convienient to use for quick draining but the rubber gaskets in both get hard after a while and when they sit against the sealing surface they get imprinted. then when you use them they dont always reseat in the same position and the previous imprint will cause a leak. I always caution people to not use the relief valve in this way you will develop a drip/leak. Instead put a loose male quick connect in somewhere, or better yet one with a ball valve and drain down that way.

    Its always nice finding all the parts to something and reuniting them. Or it was after years of small kids im getting board of the feeling as everything they get they almost always scatter to the four points of the house.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
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    I am convinced that all shops have mischievous elves. I started a spreadsheet many years ago to keep track of seldom used items. It now has 9 sheets and is hundreds of lines. I can find almost anything . Whenever I am looking for something that is not on the sheet I am sure to add it once I find that place I put it that made perfect sense at the time. The old noggin ain't what it once was and the spreadsheet helps fill in the holes.
    "A hen is only an egg's way of making another egg".


    Samuel Butler

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    28,584
    I'm in the middle of a build. Though I have an Oneida DC on my larger tools, my portable power tools have always lacked DC. I look at my shop right now, and I could easily spend a couple hours just sweeping and vacuuming up walnut "sawdust/router dust". It will be done before I even start to think of finishing!!!! I think when this table build is over, I am going to investigate an over the table DC adapter/guard/splitter from my table saw. I just ordered a dust collection adapter for my Mikita trim router and my cordless Makita circular saw. I am headed to the shop to mortise the breadboard sides for the table and then route the tenons on the field boards for the table. Since finding the DC adapter for my PC 8529 router, it will be used on the tenoning with the vacuum attached and running.
    Ken

    So much to learn, so little time.....

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    1,386
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    I'm in the middle of a build. Though I have an Oneida DC on my larger tools, my portable power tools have always lacked DC. I look at my shop right now, and I could easily spend a couple hours just sweeping and vacuuming up walnut "sawdust/router dust". It will be done before I even start to think of finishing!!!! I think when this table build is over, I am going to investigate an over the table DC adapter/guard/splitter from my table saw. I just ordered a dust collection adapter for my Mikita trim router and my cordless Makita circular saw. I am headed to the shop to mortise the breadboard sides for the table and then route the tenons on the field boards for the table. Since finding the DC adapter for my PC 8529 router, it will be used on the tenoning with the vacuum attached and running.

    Some years back I made a concerned effort to hook all portable tools in the shop up to dust collection. All started due to using a router and then buying a baseplate that collected chips. Soon led to a dedicated vacuum/dust deputy hooked to 2' pvc piping network. Most tools used in the shop now are hooked to dust collection, still have a way to go to have all tools hooked up. Does make it nicer to work down in the shop.
    Ron

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