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Thread: Thoughts on a spruce cookie table

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Posts
    103

    Thoughts on a spruce cookie table

    20240327_231853.jpg

    So I have this 24" spruce cookie I just flattened. Debating on how best to finish it...

    I'm planning on doing a bowtie or two on the top/bottom over the cracks that are filled with epoxy. Going to round-over the edges and sand the outside and top/bottom faces to 300+

    For the table top, should I do table top epoxy? I have some on hand? Would something like linseed oil or wipe on poly be a better bet?

    Should I seal it with epoxy and then finish with something else?

    Open to ideas.

  2. #2
    Just a suggestion but an oil finish would make the grain pop a bit, once fully cured, you could coat with epoxy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
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    2,813
    As with most wood, apply equal finish to both sides, equal in moisture resistance.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Posts
    103
    So far, I've shellacd it and done 2 light epoxy pours to try and fill in all the little checks. It sucked yup about a pint of shellac between both sides. It did seem to swell the grain a bit and it took a couple days of little cracking noises before I got fed up with it and started with epoxy.


    I'm thinking if it stops drinking epoxy into the cracks, I'll take the epoxy layer down flush with the wood and then do ~1/16 again of epoxy.

    Or maybe some tried and true.

    Or maybe some poly.

    Hmmm, I'll think about this over a few beverages.

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    Last edited by Steven Cooper2; 04-05-2024 at 12:31 AM. Reason: Adding Picture

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    66,166
    Since you went down the resin route, T&T is not really an option as it's a penetrating oil product in all three formulas. At this point, I'd do a thin flood coat of table top resin, abrade to flatten and then spray the finish of your choice on top before buffing that out to the sheen you prefer.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Posts
    103
    the tabletop I put on top was more to hopefully fill all the little cracks, which it only sort of did. I ended up planing it all off (just barely and trying to re-fill everything.

    I several coats of poly on it, probably ~20, with several of them being wet sanded with poly as so many of the little checks weren't fully closed and ended up as little pock marks.

    Eventually it has mostly worked out, but then my kids dented it a bit. Seems decent though...

    20240610_233314.jpg

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