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Thread: Gen Z and job interviews

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    The irony is the people doing the complaining, are ultimately responsible for that which they're complaining about.
    Absolutely right. Guilty as charged. But it's other people's kids that are the problem, not mine.
    < insert spurious quote here >

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    The irony is the people doing the complaining, are ultimately responsible for that which their complaining about.
    This thought has come to me during many different interactions with young people coming into the work force, and haunts me in darker reflective moments in retirement. If we're producing adults poorly prepared or unprepared for the world they are entering, that's not the fault of the students, but of the institutions and people who have brought them to that point - which of course means us oldsters, and perhaps especially, oldsters who had leadership roles in educating and raising the young people.

    That said, I think an awful lot of the complaining is rather vapid - yeah, the younger generations are not just like we were, and we may need to change some of our expectations and the ways we do things to fit them fully into their new roles. That's hardly new. Past the surface layers of "they are different," I still encounter highly capable, highly motivated new entrants into the work force.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Demuth View Post
    This thought has come to me during many different interactions with young people coming into the work force, and haunts me in darker reflective moments in retirement. If we're producing adults poorly prepared or unprepared for the world they are entering, that's not the fault of the students, but of the institutions and people who have brought them to that point - which of course means us oldsters, and perhaps especially, oldsters who had leadership roles in educating and raising the young people.

    That said, I think an awful lot of the complaining is rather vapid - yeah, the younger generations are not just like we were, and we may need to change some of our expectations and the ways we do things to fit them fully into their new roles. That's hardly new. Past the surface layers of "they are different," I still encounter highly capable, highly motivated new entrants into the work force.
    I agree. I'm currently mentoring several junior engineers. Both millenials and gen-zers. I'm a gen-xer. Really, I find that they're not so different. They just have a different point of view, largely one that was not their choice anyway. I'll be honest, in many ways we had it easier anyway.

    So, from this slacker... The kids, they're alright. It's generally the "adults" that are the problem.
    ~mike

    happy in my mud hut

  4. #34
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    At age 13, my oldest son made a mistake. Arrested, expelled from middle school, home detention, a year of probation. I introduced him to the owner of a machine shop, where he worked sorting hardware & organizing tool room 3 hours/night 3 nights a week (max allowable, even when not in school)--had to drive him 30 minjtes each way (2 hours total drive for me!!) to drop him off & pick him up. He used his checks to pay off his attorney, probation fees, and fines. He home-schooled until he stopped about grade 11 when he became kind of a semi-pro BMX rider. Went on to work fast food, a check cashing place, retail banking, selling hydraulic parts.

    Now...he turned 38 yesterday, is a good husband and great dad of 2 kids. Along the way, did an online BS in technology & business, got his MBA about 8 years ago. Works as a senior project manager for the international division of a major corp--one step from using corporate aircraft to go to his offices in South America. Makes a great living, yet lives a great life.

    Something about having to make your own way, being self-responsible and responsible to others...seems to strengthen the soul and build character. Always a bright kid, it was adversity and being force to pay for it that turned the corner in my son's life. Not a path i would encourage for any child (or parent!!), but proof that nose to the grindstone still can reap dividends!!

  5. #35
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    I don't understand why (seemingly mainly baby boomers? )want kids to work in high school anyway. I ran track and xc. I was in winter running club. I played a ton of street basketball. I hung out with friends and laughed and screwed around. I had an absolute blast in hs. I did work in the summers and I did work one winter break.

    But idk, if someone else took those breaks to travel w parents, play a sport etc, who cares?

    After all, once you start working it's a looong road of working. Work isn't the end all be all meaning of life. I enjoy building stuff so I made it my living, but it's also not the entirety of who I am.

    Before we are working full time adults we chase opportunities to work and after we are full time we chase time off.

    I feel like it's that general idea of "I had it rough so you have to too!" thing that we all tend to do to each other.
    Last edited by andrew whicker; 03-02-2024 at 7:30 PM.
    Yes, I have 3 phase!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    I don't understand why (seemingly mainly baby boomers? )want kids to work in high school anyway.....
    Some kids will have to work part time if they want pocket money. They can't ask their parents for something that doesn't exist (extra money lying around).
    I know that when I was in high school (well my whole life until I went in the Navy) if any of us 5 kids wanted spending money we had to [somehow] earn it.
    There was simply no extra money to hand out to us.
    If we wanted to play a sport that required buying stuff (shoes/rackets/gloves) we paid for it ourselves or we didn't play.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.”

  7. #37
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    I completely understand that and I can empathize with that situation. But we shouldn't be AIMING for that reality. That should hopefully not happen. It shouldn't be the norm.

    If we aren't careful we find ourselves celebrating the things we should be trying to fix.
    Yes, I have 3 phase!

  8. #38
    at 11 had a paper route. After a year they gave you money they had held back., What a concept so at 12 bought a mini bike. Working just seemed normal after that. Got a better route two apartments instead of sub division start at the top work your way down much faster. Fair bit of weight in those bags on saturdays.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    I don't understand why (seemingly mainly baby boomers? )want kids to work in high school anyway. I ran track and xc. I was in winter running club. I played a ton of street basketball. I hung out with friends and laughed and screwed around. I had an absolute blast in hs. I did work in the summers and I did work one winter break.

    But idk, if someone else took those breaks to travel w parents, play a sport etc, who cares?

    After all, once you start working it's a looong road of working. Work isn't the end all be all meaning of life. I enjoy building stuff so I made it my living, but it's also not the entirety of who I am.

    Before we are working full time adults we chase opportunities to work and after we are full time we chase time off.

    I feel like it's that general idea of "I had it rough so you have to too!" thing that we all tend to do to each other.
    I worked 30 hrs a week for much of high school. Paid for my jalopy car, my gas, my dates and things I wanted to buy. I still feel it was good for me. YMMV.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    “If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”

  10. #40
    good story Earl thanks for sharing it. We are all in this bowl of soup together and you taught your son lots and had to put out lots of time to do it. You could teach a few people I know about integrity.

  11. #41
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    Utterly inconsistent with my experience, which is admittedly getting to be a few years out of date. I found the kids I was hiring for biotech jobs to be incredibly well prepared and poised far beyond anything I remember of myself and my cohort growing up and moving into first jobs. Their level of sophistication in their questions and thinking about what they wanted to do, why, and how far surpassed anything I would have been capable at that age. Typically their technical knowledge and experience was far ahead of where new hires were 30-40 years ago. I see the same thing now with high school kids I have the opportunity to interact with now. Of course there are the goofballs and screw-ups, but on average I'm finding kids who are scary bright, articulate, and motivated. Maybe I'm just becoming a serious dim bulb in my advancing years so everyone just seems brighter (but I don't think so).

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    I worked 30 hrs a week for much of high school. Paid for my jalopy car, my gas, my dates and things I wanted to buy. I still feel it was good for me. YMMV.
    Those jobs, they don't exist.

    Mostly because they're being filled by adults. That economy, is gone, dead, killed intentionally.
    ~mike

    happy in my mud hut

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    Utterly inconsistent with my experience, which is admittedly getting to be a few years out of date. I found the kids I was hiring for biotech jobs to be incredibly well prepared and poised far beyond anything I remember of myself and my cohort growing up and moving into first jobs. Their level of sophistication in their questions and thinking about what they wanted to do, why, and how far surpassed anything I would have been capable at that age. Typically their technical knowledge and experience was far ahead of where new hires were 30-40 years ago. I see the same thing now with high school kids I have the opportunity to interact with now. Of course there are the goofballs and screw-ups, but on average I'm finding kids who are scary bright, articulate, and motivated. Maybe I'm just becoming a serious dim bulb in my advancing years so everyone just seems brighter (but I don't think so).
    The kids who you describe almost certainly spent multiple years working, they just did so for free. Instead of being paid for their entry level work, they probably started as “volunteers” in high school before shifting graduating to a series of unpaid “internships.”

    You probably are not seeing the kids the article describes because your hiring process has already screened them out.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    I don't understand why (seemingly mainly baby boomers? )want kids to work in high school anyway. I ran track and xc. I was in winter running club. I played a ton of street basketball. I hung out with friends and laughed and screwed around. I had an absolute blast in hs. I did work in the summers and I did work one winter break..
    I only did summer work, myself. Between school work, football and all the musical activities I was in, working during the school year was not going to happen. As I noted previously, my younger daughter did work during middle school and high school but it was a reasonable number of hours. It's how she funded gas and a contribution for for auto insurance once she was driving, too. Every kids' situation is different.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    Those jobs, they don't exist.

    Mostly because they're being filled by adults. That economy, is gone, dead, killed intentionally.
    Not around here!! We are at like 3.5% unemployment rate.... lots of jobs here, IF you want to work.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa.HVAC/R , Cloudray Galvo Fiber , -Windows 10

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