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Thread: Gen Z and job interviews

  1. #1
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    Gen Z and job interviews

    Pretty pathetic...

    20% of new college grads are taking parents to interviews, survey says

    “One in five employers have had a recent college graduate bring a parent to a job interview.”

    By Caleb Wethington

    Published: Feb. 29, 2024 at 9:48 AM MST|Updated: 15 hours ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WSMV) - What’s the most unique thing you’ve ever brought to a job interview? According to a new survey, recent Gen Z college graduates are bringing reinforcements to their job interviews: their parents.
    According to a survey of 800 U.S. managers, directors and executives who are involved in hiring conducted by Intelligent, nearly 40% of employers are avoiding hiring recent college grads.
    Below is a look at some of the key findings from the survey:



    • 38% of employers avoid hiring recent college graduates in favor of older employees
    • 1 in 5 employers have had a recent college graduate bring a parent to a job interview
    • 58% say recent college graduates are unprepared for the workforce
    • Nearly half of employers have had to fire a recent college graduate


    During job interviews, not only are some bringing their parents, but employers said Gen Z college grads are struggling with eye contact during interviews.

    “Additionally, half of employers say they ask for unreasonable compensation, and 47% say they’ve had candidates show up to their interviews dressed inappropriately,” the survey said.
    More findings in the survey include that a majority of employers believe new college grads can’t manage their workload, are entitled and lack professionalism.
    “All data found within this report derives from a survey conducted on December 7, 2023 by survey platform Pollfish and commissioned by Intelligent.com. In total 800 U.S. managers, directors and executives who are involved in hiring were surveyed,” the survey said.

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    For a hilarious sendup for a Gen Z job interview (it says it's millennial but I've been told it's more like Gen Z):

    Last edited by Patty Hann; 03-01-2024 at 8:33 AM.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.”

  2. #2
    I might be a bit of a grump, but I would automatically exclude anyone from further consideration if they brought a parent to an interview. It would show me a lack of confidence and an inability to stand on their own 2 feet. That does not bode well for either the ability to work independently or the person being promotable to any kind of leadership position in the future. The only exception to this would be a person with a disability needing physical parental assistance.
    Dave Anderson

    Chester, NH

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    The math in that headline must be from either Artificial Intelligence or Complete Lack of Intelligence. If the survey results indicate that 1 in 5 employers had a recent graduate bring a parent to an interview, those employers would have to have 100% of the recent graduates bring parents in order to meet the 20% of New College Grads bringing parents with them as noted in the headline. Or the entire body of survey respondents would have to have only seen 1 recent grad each.

    Just nit-picking on sensationalism in journalism!!

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    It's clearly the wrong thing to do, but it's the parents who should know better.

    We had this happen a few time back about 25+ years ago. In one case, an applicant asked how many days off we got for Christmas break. I blame the parents for not knowing better.
    < insert spurious quote here >

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Anderson NH View Post
    I might be a bit of a grump, but I would automatically exclude anyone from further consideration if they brought a parent to an interview. It would show me a lack of confidence and an inability to stand on their own 2 feet. That does not bode well for either the ability to work independently or the person being promotable to any kind of leadership position in the future. The only exception to this would be a person with a disability needing physical parental assistance.
    What Dave wrote times two!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl McLain View Post
    The math in that headline must be from either Artificial Intelligence or Complete Lack of Intelligence. If the survey results indicate that 1 in 5 employers had a recent graduate bring a parent to an interview, those employers would have to have 100% of the recent graduates bring parents in order to meet the 20% of New College Grads bringing parents with them as noted in the headline. Or the entire body of survey respondents would have to have only seen 1 recent grad each.

    Just nit-picking on sensationalism in journalism!!
    Go to the "new survey" link mentioned in the first line (https://www.intelligent.com/nearly-4...older-workers/ )
    It explains things a little better. (Note: it does NOT make the situation any better )
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.”

  7. #7
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    A suit is not an automatic requirement for all job interviews. A co-worker of mine said he interviewed with the IBEW to be an electrical apprentice years ago. He wore a suit and in the waiting room all of the other interviewees were wearing work clothes like you would wear on a construction site as a laborer. He said he was very specifically not chosen to be an apprentice because of his clothing. That may not have been the only reason, but he said they practically ended the interview as soon as he walked in due to the suit.

    When I was asked to come in for an interview for the job I have had for 23 years now I was specifically told not to wear a suit. I wore nice dress pants and a dress shirt. Not even sure I wore a tie. Now, it is generally never appropriate to wear shorts, a sleeveless shirt, and flip flops to a job interview unless it is a very casual environment and that is what the boss and the rest of the employees wear every day. Even then I would want to wear something a bit better than that.

  8. #8
    I doubt that statistic. A parent may drive their kid to an interview, but highly doubt almost any are going in with them. I've never interviewed a gen-z with their parent, and none of my kids' friends (all gen z) have done that.

    Maintaining eye contact is a challenge for some, though...

    IMHO, it has become super competitive to get in the door for some jobs. But the bar for nailing an interview is quite low. Show humility, genuine interest, demonstrate willingness to work hard. We can teach the rest.

  9. #9
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    Like Prashun, I'm very sceptical that that "survey" is legitimate. I have Gen Z kids and don't know of any parent in any family that has "accompanied" their kid to a job interview other than, perhaps, providing transportation if it's local and the kid doesn't drive. I will cite that this might be different for a special needs situation, but that's an exception. There's a lot of suspect stuff that floats around the Internet these days.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    I don’t know if the statistic is accurate or not. It wouldn’t happen at my work. But if it did, I’d gently take the parent into another room, make them comfortable and get them coffee or soft drink. If they made a fuss, I’d cancel the interview on the spot. But even if the child interviewed well, bringing the parent (who I moved to the other room) would be a negative compared to other candidates.

    Aside: I attended a class where the instructor told us that more than half the kids coming out of college have never held any job whatsoever. Not even mowing yards. His point was that the employer was going to have to teach them a great deal - how to dress, how to act, how to get to work on time, how to get along with co-workers, etc. I found it hard to believe at the time, but since then I’ve seen some of that and believe it.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    “If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”

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    I was aware of a manager of a unit that was comprised mostly of trades people who had the "a suit is not a good sign" attitude mentioned by Brian. He said is indicated they weren't ready to get to work and get their hands dirty. Seemed a bit silly to me given at that time dressing well for an occasion was recommended. Different today!

  12. #12
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    Frederick, I do believe that there is a statistically significant number of young folks who indeed did not have employment during high school and college and the job they obtain when they graduate from college is potentially their first employment ever. It's not universal, however. My younger daughter (now age 24) started working for money at age 10 (equestrian facility) and worked all through her four years at Penn State because she chose to go to the local campus and live at home. That let her keep her not-quite full time job at a local eating establishment, (front of house at first but moved to back of house doing the accounting later on) Her struggle with post university employment has been wanting to be in a specific industry which has not yet materialized.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Like Prashun, I'm very sceptical that that "survey" is legitimate. I have Gen Z kids and don't know of any parent in any family that has "accompanied" their kid to a job interview other than, perhaps, providing transportation if it's local and the kid doesn't drive. I will cite that this might be different for a special needs situation, but that's an exception. There's a lot of suspect stuff that floats around the Internet these days.
    Sorry you don't agree . I guess the HR rep I know was lying to me.
    And my BF's daughter (Age 27) who knows kids in her classes who took their parents to a job interview.
    I guess she was lying about it too.
    Last edited by Patty Hann; 03-01-2024 at 9:51 AM.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.”

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Howatt View Post
    I was aware of a manager of a unit that was comprised mostly of trades people who had the "a suit is not a good sign" attitude mentioned by Brian. He said is indicated they weren't ready to get to work and get their hands dirty. Seemed a bit silly to me given at that time dressing well for an occasion was recommended. Different today!
    This was probably 20 years ago and my co-worker likely had it drilled into him that a suit is required for a job interview. His current job is the first real office job he has had. He had previously worked at various jobs where you get your hands dirty.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Frederick, I do believe that there is a statistically significant number of young folks who indeed did not have employment during high school and college and the job they obtain when they graduate from college is potentially their first employment ever. It's not universal, however. My younger daughter (now age 24) started working for money at age 10 (equestrian facility) and worked all through her four years at Penn State because she chose to go to the local campus and live at home. That let her keep her not-quite full time job at a local eating establishment, (front of house at first but moved to back of house doing the accounting later on) Her struggle with post university employment has been wanting to be in a specific industry which has not yet materialized.
    Understand and agree with you Jim. It isn’t all of them - some parents (like you) get it and teach them. But I have several kids right nearby whose folks never expected them to work - and it shows.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    “If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”

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