Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: campfire stainless coin size

  1. #1

    campfire stainless coin size

    took a diagram and file I created and sized it for a coin sized engrave on stainless steel
    I am getting more experience to actually engrave some coins, this is just the start


    https://youtu.be/Ma5in2XEa50
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Looking good as always

  3. #3
    thanks a lot , getting new experiences

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,774
    2 thumbs up Stan, the fiber laser is adding to your list of projects.

  5. #5

    fiber laser

    it is I cannot believe the detail from a 16in diagram to a coin size
    i drew up a canadian nickel from 2015 diagram and dxf file and engraved it on stainless
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,774
    Nice, I would polish the stainless first. Are you planning to use your plasma cutter cut out the blanks before you engrave them?

  7. #7
    how does one polish stainless, (800grit sandpaper) I have been using steel wool on each piece before the engrave
    Also I don't have plasma my shop is all wood it would be like smoking in a match box
    I contract all the plasma cut
    Mind you i could cut these out using the 300 watt laser but the O2 is expensive and at a high pressure its gone pretty quick
    it uses O2 or nitrogen
    I have cut been through about 2 tanks of O2 lesson learned about costs

  8. #8

    few more engraves on aluminum

    these were interesting diagrams I had done back in 2011
    and there is one its an Aztec calendar very busy, in fact I had quite a time engraving
    it with the CO2 laser
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,774
    Polishing is mostly done using buffing wheels and multiple grade buffing compounds. It's like polishing brass it just takes longer.
    If the material is very rough then you can start by sanding but that is a long road as stainless steel is pretty hard.

    I use to make custom stainless belt buckles when I was in the power plant construction business. We worked pretty hard and spent lots of time finishing stainless belt buckles to get a mirror finish, especially when there was a lot of detail like twisted EB Ring and tig wire details. If I had a fiber laser in those days I could have made a fortune engraving belt buckles for tradesmen. I have seen stainless belt buckles that cost a couple thousand dollars to make. I use to cut farm brands from 1/8" thick stainless sheet for center pieces for friends at work. In turn they would weld for me on the buckles I was designing.
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 03-03-2024 at 9:04 AM.

  10. #10
    you have had some good experiences and yes wish this equipment would have been available way back
    like the CNC 3d cuts , i would have done well with wood carvings back then
    Its funny things were different back then and now its not that easy small business is tough
    and people are not willing to pay what it costs to make
    when you say you were in the power plant business , I was a power plant operator (hydraulic , transformer station and the nuclear operator)
    good job and interesting

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,774
    I was a Quality Control Piping Inspector at several nuclear plant construction projects in the 1970's and 1980's. In later years I was a Construction Engineer working for our State Power Company (VEPCO) at several generating stations, nuclear and coal. At North Anna Power Station in the mid 1970's the construction workers would pay any amount of money for anything they wanted. If the item was unique tradesmen were very generous, mostly because we were all working 12 hours per day seven days per week and the money the union trades made was mind blowing at double time after 40 hours. We had a $100,000.00 football pool every year for the Superbowl, that's a thousand dollars a block, and the pool sold out in just a couple of days There was also a weekly football pool for a hooker, hotel room and a bottle of liquor. Anything and everything was on the table, it was a crazy time and place to be.

    I agree that business is tough these days but there are rare exceptions. Innovative products are still worth the time to develop and invest your time and energy, and it helps to be in the right place at the right time. Off the top of my head I would consider making stainless steel signs if I had a plasma cutter and a fiber laser today and I was younger and in better health. Why? Patient care facilities are now required to use signs that do not have any crevices that can trap germs and that can be cleaned quickly and efficiently. I can do it with solid surface material dye-sublimating the text and graphics but the cost based on time to fabricate is pretty high. Today I would be seriously concerned about hiring people when the work load started heading for the clouds. I tried years ago to hire young people and train them, even paid them twice the local wage and they just didn't want to work. I hired old men, that worked but it didn't last very long before they retired or had serious medical problems.

    Glass signs are also a good source of extremely profitable work for very high-end facilities and there are very few sign companies that offer these kinds of products. I was involved in a project that required five 30" by 50" glass signs. Only one company bid on the job at twelve thousand dollars per sign and when we accepted their offer they backed out of the job. I had to do the job in the sign shop at CNU even though I was swamped at the time, the signs cost me about 400 bucks each plus my salary. Look over the horizon, there are wonderful opportunities every day if you can handle the strain and have a reliable workforce.

    I have had two serious heart attacks ten years ago and spent the last one and a half years in a cancer treatment program, my days in the sign business have ended.

  12. #12
    Keith all that at end does not sound good.
    so far my health has been good one serious item in 2010 but since then I have been ok
    the company we worked for ontario hydro have been monitoring us becasue of working at Douglas point nuclear power station
    as we all got our max body dose each year and possibly warded off any cancer growth ( I am hoping ) the station was the first and had lots
    of problems . off line more than on line...but we were young and put our hearts into it trying to keep it going
    Finally got shut down and we all went to the Bruce Complex which is running today ,very well 8 reactors and talk of another 4 coming
    But I am glad to be out of there as things have changed a lot
    Funny that we have this nuclear thing in common

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,774
    From these two pictures you might get some ideas for other projects that you can add to your product line.
    They are all overdue for another polishing but I rarely wear them anymore, since I left the workforce I don't wear belts these days.
    An old electric motor with a buffing wheel attached will take care of polishing. You can also use a lathe, drill press, or any number of other shop machines to spin a buffing wheel.
    With patience you can make beautiful stainless steel mirrors that are often used in areas where glass is not allowed. Once you have the mirror surface you can use your fiber laser to add whatever designs you can dream up. If you use a plasma capability you can make just about any shape you need that compliments your design.

    The buckle with the K in the middle I wore for over 25 years. The outside piece was cut on a 45 degree from inch and a half schedule 80 stainless pipe then cut in half and welded back together. The center ring was sliced from one and a quarter stainless tubing, next is a ring of three eights tubing then a smaller ring to hold the K which was cut from a one sixteenths plate with a Dremel Tool. The two short twisted pieces were made by twisting EB Ring using a vise and hand drill. This one is pretty heavy and makes an excellent self defense weapon when you swing it from the leather belt wrapped around your hand. I only had to use it once.

    The wagon wheel was surrounded by two pieces of one sixteenth diameter tig wire twisted together. The buckle on the top left was one of easiest to make, it was just 35 electrical spacers tack welded on the back side. I can't remember what size tubing we used for the silver dollar but we put the coin in the freezer then pressed it into the tubing ring with a thumb. We never had one to fall out
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 03-06-2024 at 8:54 AM.

  14. #14
    you have done some great work, fantastic such detail

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •