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Thread: How to bend wood like this - Outdoor furniture project

  1. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Alan, I completed my chairs. Here's how the shaping of the backs turned out - hopefully a little inspiration ...



    More photos on the hand tool forum.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Beautiful as usual, Derek. Are those wedged tenons holding onto the seat from the legs?

    Been looking at your website. So cool.

    Doing the quarter circle segments makes attaching two 90 degree segments together before bandsawing impossible for me, even with my relatively large bandsaw, so Kevin's suggestion, which I'm sure is much easier, won't work for me. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  2. #212
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    Doing the quarter circle segments makes attaching two 90 degree segments together before bandsawing impossible for me, even with my relatively large bandsaw, so Kevin's suggestion, which I'm sure is much easier, won't work for me. Sigh..
    Alan, what won't work?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  3. #213
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post

    Doing the quarter circle segments makes attaching two 90 degree segments together before bandsawing impossible for me, even with my relatively large bandsaw, so Kevin's suggestion, which I'm sure is much easier, won't work for me. Sigh...
    Why not? You might need an outboard support but surely you have sufficient room between blade and frame for the offcuts.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 06-23-2024 at 7:43 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  4. #214
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Why not? You might need an outboard support but surely you have sufficient room between blade and frame for the offcuts.
    Actually, no. It barely fits for my 90 degree pieces. I actually have to remove the fence after setting the jig. Really wish it did.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  5. #215
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    Actually, no. It barely fits for my 90 degree pieces. I actually have to remove the fence after setting the jig. Really wish it did.
    Can you post a photo of your setup?

  6. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Can you post a photo of your setup?
    Sure. Happy to. I'd love to be able to do what you describe, but unless I'm missing something, it won't work with the size of the pieces I'm working with.

    Here's the bandsaw sled. Again this is used to produce parallel curves on a piece that is 90° of a circle.
    Bandsaw Sled 1.jpg
    And this is it with measurements to the fence (which I actually have to remove for the 26" long 6"high piece of lumber to not hit the fence at the beginning and end of the cut).
    Bandsaw Sled 2 with Measurements.jpg

    And here is a completed piece that has had the ends cut down to precise 90° angles at the proper length/circumference:
    Bandsaw Sled with Completed Piece for Comparison.jpg

    Gluing/doweling on a continuing piece would cause the wood to hit the fence/bandsaw and run out of room. Not even close.

    Now I guess I could build another jig that's opposite and have the wood rotate towards me. I would have to significantly enlarge the bandsaw table to prevent tipping. I guess that's doable, but never thought of it. It's not the way Brian Boggs does his chairs (I'm using his jig technique). And it would be a seriously heavy piece of wood. Not sure I could lift it. I can barely lift the 6"x8"x26" pieces now.

    What am I missing?
    Last edited by Alan Lightstone; 06-24-2024 at 10:45 AM.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  7. #217
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    Table extension with F-coupling for Felder 01.2.140 | Length 500 mm

    That'll handle your support problem. I find it to be an incredibly useful support on potentially all three sides of the Felder bandsaws...
    Last edited by Mike King; 06-24-2024 at 12:02 PM.

  8. #218
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    I have one of those already on the bandsaw for the infeed part of this job. I actually have the longer version also that I tried on the outfeed side when I was trying bent laminations. They are very nice (the shorter one is more versatile and easier to use).

    I think putting a piece of plywood on the bandsaw table might be a better solution, but we're talking about a large, heavy piece of wood that needs to be cut around a curve and hard to push against the blade. The 6" high piece of wood makes this challenging. This would also make using the magnets I have to clamp down the jig in the two positions difficult or impossible to use.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  9. #219
    edited due to not looking closely at your photos first time around.

    You can have the waste fall off between the blade and the column. Just make an auxiliary table wide enough to support the piece outboard, run a slot in it and clamp it to the main table. If you don't want clamps above the table bore some holes and screw up through the iron table or tap the holes and fasten the auxiliary table with flathead machine screws. Wax the auxiliary table to ease feeding.

    You could assemble the entire back including the straight horns and saw it out directly. You would have to have the guide finger pointing out for the outside of the curve and relocate it pointing in for the inside curve to avoid the U hitting the column. In each case the waste is to the inside and the work exits to the outboard side. A jig for each curve would aid stability and holding the work.

    As you say, it may not be practical due to the weight of the assembly. You could rough out the segment shapes while cutting in clamping ears prior to assembly. You also could cut down the waste (and grain runout) by using more, shorter segments
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 06-24-2024 at 1:43 PM.

  10. #220
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    What am I missing?
    Alan, throw away the jigs. They take up space you cannot afford. Just saw the segments separately ...



    Initial perfect accuracy is unnecessary. You just need to have a single reference side. Do this on a belt sander, if you have one ...



    Then join them up ...



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #221
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    So some good news. After being closed for a week for the 4th of July, one of my lumber suppliers reopened today. As promised, their wide belt sander could just barely fit the 6" chair back on a 1/4" MDF sled for sanding. After multiple very thin passes, I got it down to the finished dimension of 5-3/4".
    Chair Back Piece - Sanded with Wide-Belt.jpg

    So I do have a working path going forward for the other 3 chair backs, and dowels and gluing on the front arm pieces.

    Sanding the outside curve (convex) should be relatively easy with my edge sander, and hand sanding. The inside (concave curve) is now presenting a challenge. I initially tried my curved spokeshave, and despite trying hard to sharpen it well, the wood resisted it. Hard stuff, this white oak. So now not sure of best way to sand the inside curve.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  12. #222
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    That looks great. Have you tried scraping it? I think it might work if the surface isn’t too rough
    Good Luck
    Aj

  13. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    That looks great. Have you tried scraping it? I think it might work if the surface isn’t too rough
    Good Luck
    No, too rough yet. Perhaps with a decent amount of work I'll be able to.
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off
    - It's above my pay grade. Mongo only pawn in game of life.

  14. #224
    You can use the idle roller on your edge sander. Use a light touch to avoid generating ripples or divots. A compass plane could be useful but beware the change in grain direction at the joints. You also can use a small diameter sanding mandrel with a drill motor or sander/polisher as turners do on the inside of bowls. https://woodturnerswonders.com/colle...mandrel-3-inch You might need to use a soft interface pad depending on the curve radius. https://woodturnerswonders.com/colle...ent-velcro-pad
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 07-09-2024 at 5:01 PM.

  15. #225
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    I took a Maloof-inspired bench class with Larry White at Anderson Ranch several years ago. While there was cutting Maloof-inspired joints, most of the work was actually handwork using rasps and sandpaper. In fact, I thought the workshop was mislabelled: it should've been "Advanced Seminar in Sanding."

    Larry didn't like using spokeshaves or drawknives for shaping work -- too much chance of tear out. So, his weapons of choice in the Maloof studio (he was Sam's first employee and the longest tenured) were die grinders, a dynabride air sander, a Nicholson rasp, and lots and lots of hand sanding with various blocks he made. Dowels wrapped with sandpaper. Scraps of wood shaped into various radius with sandpaper glued on them. He had a coffee can of implements with sandpaper in various grits and used them extensively.

    What's the point? In sculptural work, hand work is often the best strategy. Get yourself a good set of rasps (the Chinese Nicholson's are supposedly vastly inferior; think about an Arrou or Liogier hand stitched rasp), some scraps, dowels, and start on the shaping that will add character and finesse to your chairs.

    Mike

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