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Thread: Table Saw vs Track Saw vs Miter Saw for (mostly) hand-tool woodworker

  1. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    For crosscuts, consider this...how often do you really need to crosscut a piece of material that length with precision for a project? I always try to break down lumber into more manageable sizes before they even see a machine, whether it's the short stroke slider or my jointer/thicknesser. It's more efficient (especially for the jointer/thicknesser), potentially safer because the material is easier to handle and allows for more reasonable infeed/outfeed requirements within the shop space available. While I "can" put a very long board on my slider for cross cutting because I have a larger space, I try not to. I break down with a hand-held, battery operated circular saw and go from there. It's rare that any project needs material more than 5-6' long for any one component.
    It's not common, but I'm thinking a long wall cleat or trimming the end of a long table. I want to understand the constraints because it limits the maximum size of the pieces I can potentially build. For example I'm considering building an ~8' dining table this year and whether trimming the panel glueup would be realistic on such a saw.

  2. #47
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    The ability to straight line rip, that Derek has shown, is exactly why I'm always tempted by sliders. For sure, it looks like a smaller footprint than this.

    ~mike

    happy in my mud hut

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Chavez View Post
    It's not common, but I'm thinking a long wall cleat or trimming the end of a long table. I want to understand the constraints because it limits the maximum size of the pieces I can potentially build. For example I'm considering building an ~8' dining table this year and whether trimming the panel glueup would be realistic on such a saw.
    I agree, this is very helpful for things like long, narrow, casework as well.
    ~mike

    happy in my mud hut

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Chavez View Post
    It's not common, but I'm thinking a long wall cleat or trimming the end of a long table. I want to understand the constraints because it limits the maximum size of the pieces I can potentially build. For example I'm considering building an ~8' dining table this year and whether trimming the panel glueup would be realistic on such a saw.
    You can do this on a sliding table saw, but you would want a much longer crosscut fence along with an outrigger table to support that 8' dining table top. Something like the Hammer K4 Perform or Felder K500 Professional:

    https://www.felder-group.com/en-us/p...perform-p64676

    https://www.felder-group.com/en-us/p...-k-500-p143754

    However, at this point, you are past the 10 foot wide mark for space requirements. A track saw would work much better in such a small space.

  5. #50
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    If I were going to get a slider, the K 500 Profession is the one I would get without question. Does anyone know if imperial scales are an option on the K500? The Mule is moving to a new garage, so I'll have space

    OP, like mentioned above 8' and 32+" wide 6/4 table is very heavy. That's best left to a hefty slider or even hand held saw/track saw and aluminum guide of sorts.

    That said, unlike Jim, I find 5-7' very common in my shop building furniture. My current sideboard is 70" wide and the last few things (dresser, sofa table, coffee table) all were > 5'. I work mostly in hardwood so panel/sider isn't something I use all too often, but I do have a sliding crosscut on my cabinet saw and cross-cutting those is super awesome. It would be equally awesome on a slider, with greater capabilities with respect to sheet goods.

    Last edited by Michael Burnside; 02-02-2024 at 12:30 PM.

  6. #51
    You sound like me.

    A track saw is a pain in the butt for me. I despise setting it up. It's never quite supported perfectly, or the piece is just a bit awkward. For me, I've concluded that a track saw is only usable for me to break down things that are too big to muscle onto a table saw. So I use mine for breaking down sheets and slabs. But almost never for repeat rips.

    A cabinet saw is too large for me (I had one for years).

    I've been using a bandsaw for the past 3 years without a table saw and it works pretty well. More versatile than a table saw, but keeping it tuned for ripping can be tedious as I also use it for curve cutting, so there are blade changes and tensioning nuissances.

    I haven't yet pulled the trigger, but I am seriously considering getting a benchtop table saw. I'm debating between the Bosch that's been around for years, the Skilsaw, and (my likely choice) the Sawstop CTS. The braking system is a nice-to-have (for me). But what is clinching it for me is that it appears to get good reviews for precision. I believe all three have available stands that make them easy to set up and stow away.

  7. #52
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    I feel like some of you are not accounting for how much space a slider needs. The pics below are my K700S width, which is the same width requirements of the K500 Professional that Michael wants (if you get the full 49" rip capacity). The width requirement of my saw is exactly 11 feet wide. I do have it spaced 1.5 feet away from the wall for dust collection and enough machine clearance to allow me to use the full 49" for ripping panels. This means 12-1/2 feet total width requirements. For reference, the shop size is exactly 20 x 20 feet and the saw extends significantly over the 10 foot center line mark.

    K700S_saw_width.jpgK700S_saw_width2.jpg

    Now you could get the 800mm / 31" rip capacity and reduce the width requirement down to 9-1/2 feet. It still takes up a lot of space.

    The front-to-back space requirements are also a lot, but I do have a long 9 foot slider. The 9 foot was the longest I could put in and I still have to open my garage door if I want to do a longer cut. A 10 foot slider would be too long.

    IMG_0627.jpgIMG_0629.jpg

    Now this is an extreme case. A short stroke slide would not require as much room, but it gives you an idea of what's needed.

    Michael - The K500 Professional is fine if you get the standard 2050mm sliding table (6-2/3 feet). However, if you wanted a longer slider, it is recommended to go with the K700S because the base on the K500 is just too short to properly support such a long slider.

  8. #53
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    Does anyone know if imperial scales are an option on the K500?


    - You should contact a Felder sales rep. My K700S has a combination imperial/metric on my rip fence and an imperial on the crosscut. I heard Felder was gong to imperial/metric gauges, but you should confirm. These are options that are not necessarily published on the Felder product page.

  9. #54
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    Thanks Aaron. I have a pretty big shop, so space isn't a huge concern, but I think a 6'-ish slider is more than enough for me.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Chavez View Post
    For example I'm considering building an ~8' dining table this year and whether trimming the panel glueup would be realistic on such a saw.
    If that's the case, I'll take back my miter saw recommendation and instead say get a track saw.

    I have all 3 tools you asked about, and the track saw gets used the least.

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Chavez View Post
    It's not common, but I'm thinking a long wall cleat or trimming the end of a long table. I want to understand the constraints because it limits the maximum size of the pieces I can potentially build. For example I'm considering building an ~8' dining table this year and whether trimming the panel glueup would be realistic on such a saw.
    I've crosscut panels like that on mine, although I chose to trip the 7'6" table for our three season porch last summer with my tracksaw. Why? I could bring the tool to the assembly which was darn heavy. You have to pick your battles. Now for wall cleats, I might rip them on the slider, but I'd most certainly trim to length using other means if they are "long-long".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Chavez View Post
    It's not common, but I'm thinking a long wall cleat or trimming the end of a long table. I want to understand the constraints because it limits the maximum size of the pieces I can potentially build. For example I'm considering building an ~8' dining table this year and whether trimming the panel glueup would be realistic on such a saw.
    The likely width of the 8’ dining table probably rules out the miter saw and the MFT for that project at least, unless you are gluing up portions and finishing with hand tools. If you go with a Festool track saw, consider the power and capacity of the different models. I have an older TS 55, and cross cutting thick hardwoods and ripping beveled cleats is not ideal. I saw a newer model a month ago at a Festool road show. Much more power, but the 75 model (which I have not used) might be better. As mentioned in an earlier post, I recently got a table saw, which I already see will largely replace the MFT, track saw and Kapex. If you can find a way to fit one into your garage, it might be the solution. If not, I still think the MFT, track saw, band saw, hand tools and some saw horses will get you a long way with your space requirements. I got the Hammer K3 with the mobility kit. Easy to move, but I don’t plan on moving it. The wheels move perpendicular to the slider, so in your set up, that would be something to consider. You could perhaps arrange it with the slider parallel to your jointer and fit any size sliding carriage with your 17’ clearance, but you would probably need a different mobility kit.

  13. #58
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    I took these photos today to demonstrate the extension of the wagon on my K3 with the 1250mm/49" wagon ...

    The wagon has a parallel guide on it for tapering legs.





    That does not look like much, does it?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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