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Thread: Removing Broken Tenon From Chisel Socket

  1. #1
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    Removing Broken Tenon From Chisel Socket

    Another SMC member had an odd lot of chisels listed in the SMC Classifieds at a price I couldn’t refuse. Some of these may make some good stocking stuffers for the grandkids coming up for Christmas.

    One socket chisel, that looks like a 1/8” Fulton sash mortise chisel, had its tenon broken off and stuck in the socket.

    My hope was that it might be loose enough to just pull it out. A large gimlet bit was used but the tenon didn’t budge:

    Large Gimlet Bit Socket Work.jpg

    So a 13/64” drill was used to bore a hole for a 1/4-20 tap:

    Tapping 1:4-20.jpg

    Yes, a tap made for use in metal can be used in wood.

    A longish 1/4-20 carriage bolt was driven in:

    Forcing Out Broken Tenon.jpg

    With a bit of work the tenon finally gave up:

    Broken Tenon Removed.jpg

    I’m undecided whether to make a new handle for this chisel or wait until the kids are here and see if they want to try their hand at making their own handles.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #2
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    I nominate Jim Koepke to be Patron Saint of old woodworking tools.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  3. #3
    Nice save Jim, I've had to do similar. It's really satisfying when it finally lets go.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Another SMC member had an odd lot of chisels listed in the SMC Classifieds at a price I couldnít refuse. Some of these may make some good stocking stuffers for the grandkids coming up for Christmas.

    One socket chisel, that looks like a 1/8Ē Fulton sash mortise chisel, had its tenon broken off and stuck in the socket.

    My hope was that it might be loose enough to just pull it out. A large gimlet bit was used but the tenon didnít budge:

    Large Gimlet Bit Socket Work.jpg

    So a 13/64Ē drill was used to bore a hole for a 1/4-20 tap:

    Tapping 1:4-20.jpg

    Yes, a tap made for use in metal can be used in wood.

    A longish 1/4-20 carriage bolt was driven in:

    Forcing Out Broken Tenon.jpg

    With a bit of work the tenon finally gave up:

    Broken Tenon Removed.jpg

    Iím undecided whether to make a new handle for this chisel or wait until the kids are here and see if they want to try their hand at making their own handles.

    jtk
    Looks like you drilled and tapped all the way through and used the bolt as a jack screw. You might have also tried a heat gun. The metal would have expanded, and the wood would then come out.
    I have also just drilled through and then used a smaller chisel to split the wood. Depends on the tools you have.

    Good job Jim.

  5. #5
    Good work.

    I've had good results removing plugs over screws by driving a drywall screw into the plug. It usually pops it out like that.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Wood View Post
    Good work.

    I've had good results removing plugs over screws by driving a drywall screw into the plug. It usually pops it out like that.
    If there is ever an occasion where this comes up again, that will be given a try. It may help to file the point off the end. Though I may be thinking of deck screws instead of drywall screws.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
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    Very timely post, Jim! I've got several vintage socket chisels that I need to either a) remove the broken off tenon from the socket or b) replace a handle that seems to be glued in. Your method and those mentioned by Eric and Cameron will be put to the test soon. Does the method change if glue was used?

  8. #8
    I typically try to first drill, then "chisel" or pry out the remainder of the wood. Far too often the chisels have been abused and the socket mushroomed. This makes it more difficult, as some of the tenon is caged in the socket.
    IMG_0682.jpg
    Sometimes it's necessary to remove some of the socket metal to rehab the tool.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Manning View Post
    Very timely post, Jim! I've got several vintage socket chisels that I need to either a) remove the broken off tenon from the socket or b) replace a handle that seems to be glued in. Your method and those mentioned by Eric and Cameron will be put to the test soon. Does the method change if glue was used?
    Glue just makes it harder. Epoxy is the worst. Just keep working it and no matter what the method, it will come out. You can even try putting denatured alcohol on it to soften it up a little.

  10. #10
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    If one is epoxied in, heat will break down the epoxy. For pulling golf club heads, we use a little butane torch to heat it. Golf club epoxy is designed to break down about 100 degrees before the laminating epoxy in a shaft, so it's a lot more of a delicate operation than this case. Regular epoxy will yield to heat too though. It doesn't take anything like the amount of heat it takes to blue the steel.

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