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Thread: heated vests- battery powered

  1. #1
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    heated vests- battery powered

    I'm looking at getting a heated vest for my wife. Would love any input from anyone who has experience with them.

    Not wanting a fancy piece of clothing, but rather a thin vest she would put over a shirt and then a jacket over that.

    Battery life would only need to be around 3-4 hours to keep the weight down.

  2. #2
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    I don't know if they make a vest, but i've had a Milwaukee hoodie for the past 3 or 4 years. Uses the M12 platform, but there's an adapter for M18 batteries if you run into the need for a longer day. You're thinking right on the layering--closer to the body is a more efficient use of the heat, no matter what you do. When i got mine i was doing 12 hour days on Friday & Saturday in a football stadium--so long life was a higher priority than the battery weight in that setting. For heading out to my unheated garage shop, the little 2ah M12 batteries are great for a few hours at a time.

  3. #3
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    Several choices at ToolNut including Milwaukee
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    Sep 2016
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    Milwaukee and Makita makes them. Ororo is the one brand I know. They use a standard usb battery bank, about 8 hours run time. Problem is my wife's does not use a usb plug but a small headphone jack cord out of the vest. few battery banks have that jack.
    I bought a made in China mans 3xl vest it is small for a mans Large size. But enough my wife can wear it.
    Be careful some are not battery power but 12 volt cigarette lighter plug for motorcycle use.
    Cost around $120 new, $30-75 used. More expensive this time of year. Cheapest in summer. Many on ebay have no battery. A battery bank is $15-25. More amp hours= more money
    Bill D.

    https://www.ororowear.com/collection...SAAEgJg9fD_BwE
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 12-03-2023 at 12:56 PM.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2018
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    As a part of Amazon Vine I have gotten a couple to try. They work, sort of. IMO they need to be work under a heavier coat to keep the heat from escaping. The ones I have tried (Chinese brands) use a power bank, one of those battery packs that can charge a phone. One had it's own style connector because, they said, the USB connector didn't allow enough power to get the vest hot enough. The problem is that anything not standard will be a problem when the battery needs replacing or if you want to have two batteries.

    As for how long, it's all down to the battery. The longer you want it to last the heavier the battery will be. One of the vests came with a 10,000mAh battery and the other 15,000mHa. The 10k weighs about a half pound and the 15k is about 3/4 of a pound. The half pound battery isn't bad but the 3/4 is noticeable. The wife may use my vest (she avoids going out in the cold weather now) and I think I would send her out with two lighter batteries. She can carry one in each pocket or one in her pocketbook.

    The final thing is the lights. One of the ones tested looks like a Christmas tree when it's on. It has the ability to turn on different zones independently. But it has lights to let you know each zone is on and if it's set to low, med, or high. One has minimal lighting with enough information to be useful but limited ability to control zones. The third has it under a flap. But to see it you must lift the flap all the way up. If it's under an outer coat it shouldn't be too much of an issue but it's still something to think about.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, the reason i did Milwaukee was because of the tools & batteries i already had. That gave me plenty of flexibility on time & battery weight for the heat. Milwaukee's 18 to 12 volt converter is claimed to only use that 12v of 18v in the M18 batteries, extending the usable time--i didn't even try to analyze that. I do know that bouncing between Medium & Low heat, a 3ah M18 battery gets me 8 hours plus in my hoodie, if i don't put too much under it. Keeping the heat close to the body helps it to get to me more easily, so i'm typically a thermal t-shirt-hoodie-coat for mostly standing still to light activity. It's all overkill for shoveling and/or blowing snow!!

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the replies. The Milwaukee looks perfect but expensive as it is 'tool only' and being I'm all Makita, I'd have to buy a battery and charger. I'm still considering it tho.

    The USB vests, mostly from Chinese companies caught my eye first as they are much less expensive and lighter but I'm concerned about life span- crapping out after a couple years just past the warranty. I want something that will last and be dependable. For whatever reason, Makita chose to only warm two places in the back. I think heating the front and collar would be very desirable.

    The Milwaukee is looking better I guess- but that's an expensive vest!

  8. #8
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    OK- Just jumped in the pool. Ordered a Milwaukee vest from ToolNut. The outrageous cost was offset somewhat by a free battery.

    I realized if I was buying a tool for myself, it wouldn't take long for me to justify the cost and pull the trigger.

    50 years of love and devotion more than fit the bill.

    Thanks again for the input.

  9. #9
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    Sep 2013
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    My perpetually freezing sister has the Milwaukee and loves it.

  10. #10
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    I got milwaukee when they first came out. Make sure you figure out how it works before you go outside in the cold. I got outside in the -20 with windchill (a lot of wind) and I was perfectly comfortable but 2 hours later the battery died and its little more than a windbreaker. I had spare batteries but I only got it turned on the first time with dumb luck. I couldn't figure it out. My foreman came and gave me a ride to my truck 1/2 mile away 2 hours later. I was never so cold in my life

    Long press turns it on

  11. #11
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    Long press is right . On my wife's it is like 4 seconds press. My Royobi lawnmower is 3-4 seconds press of the on button.
    Good thing is if my wife is cold I can see if her vest is turned on by the little pilot light. If it is not I remind her to turn it on.
    Bill D

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Long press is right . On my wife's it is like 4 seconds press. My Royobi lawnmower is 3-4 seconds press of the on button.
    Good thing is if my wife is cold I can see if her vest is turned on by the little pilot light. If it is not I remind her to turn it on.
    Bill D
    I believe mine is the same that day i kept letting go at 2-3 seconds

  13. #13
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    Get the Milwaukee. I’m very pleased with mine. It lasts a long time and stays very warm.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    Get the Milwaukee. I’m very pleased with mine. It lasts a long time and stays very warm.
    DONE! I can't thank everyone enough for nudging me to Milwaukee even tho I was reluctant because of the price. The free battery was a huge incentive but there is nothing like testimonials from folks you trust.

    This creates a new situation for me. Now that I'll have access to a Milwaukee charger, my self imposed Makita constraints are loosened. This could be even more expensive than I thought!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Zellers View Post
    DONE! I can't thank everyone enough for nudging me to Milwaukee even tho I was reluctant because of the price. The free battery was a huge incentive but there is nothing like testimonials from folks you trust.

    This creates a new situation for me. Now that I'll have access to a Milwaukee charger, my self imposed Makita constraints are loosened. This could be even more expensive than I thought!
    Keep an eye out for a deal on the M12 "Installation Kit" to justify the hoodie. All my stuff was 18v but i picked up the installation kit last spring as i knew i'd have some tight spots in my deck replacement. Ended up using it for laying almost all the decking--the torque was perfect and the light weight was a gift. Happy spending!!

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