Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 20 of 20

Thread: Thin butcher block boards?

  1. #16
    Then there is the less known fact that block planes are for planing blocks i.e. end grain butcher blocks.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southwest US
    Posts
    927
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    Butcher block and thin doesn't make sense.
    I think they meant thin cutting board.
    I always connect Butcher blocks with a meat cleaver. That's what my grandpa used to chop up rabbits. His block was at least a foot thick.
    Good luck
    Your Grandpa chopped up Thumper??!!! Oh nooooooo!!!
    Last edited by Patty Hann; 12-02-2023 at 3:04 AM.
    "What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you are standing.
    It also depends on what sort of person you are.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX - Boulder Creek, CA
    Posts
    825
    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Wood View Post
    Then there is the less known fact that block planes are for planing blocks i.e. end grain butcher blocks.
    I was gonna say... thought I should probably look it up tomorrow to be sure. But generally massively thick ... so they last a generation or more in a commercial butcher shop.

    End grain whicks moisture away so the block dries and bacteria doesn't flourish ... like they will in plastic trays that stay wet in the knife cuts.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,909
    Timothy

    I think you just need to ask the client what the intended use of the board(s) is?
    The thinnest cutting board I have is probably 5/8" thick. It was made out of a choke cherry log, from a tree I cut down in the yard. It's been on my kitchen counter for over 20 years and is still flat, but it sees limited use. It is mostly used to protect my granite counter tops.
    I also have Bubinga cutting board in various sizes. Thickness is probably a little over an inch. These are also primarily to protect the counters, though the one next to the kitchen sink sees a lot of use.
    I have made a large probably 5/8" thick, q-sawn maple cutting board for a friend.It was 24"x 36", and is used to roll bread dough out on, and make pastry on it. I don't think it's ever seen a knife. That was made 20+ years ago and is in daily use, and cleaned multiple times per day. It has no finish on it. It is a bare board. She covers it with flour and goes to work.
    The term "butcher block" to me, means an end grain orientation to the cutting surface. But I don't really care if someone calls it a butcher block, cutting board, pastry board, or Quiji board, it just wood at the end of the day, and as long as everyone understands how the term is being applied, we're all speaking the same language. So, there is a little confusion here.
    One of my largest cutting boards measures 22"x34" and is 5/4 thick bubinga. It cover the burners on our cooktop when the cook top is not in use. This board is awkward for my wife to move around, and it retrospect I could have made it much thinner, to make it easier for her to deal with. It could be that your client doesn't want a heavy board to move about.
    Speak with your client to understand her needs. She may not need, or want, a big thick, heavy, board.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    9,557
    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Grass View Post
    I was gonna say... thought I should probably look it up tomorrow to be sure. But generally massively thick ... so they last a generation or more in a commercial butcher shop.

    End grain whicks moisture away so the block dries and bacteria doesn't flourish ... like they will in plastic trays that stay wet in the knife cuts.
    End grain wicks moisture deeper into the wood, so wouldn't it pull bacteria in as well? I know that wood is better at resisting bacteria growth than plastic, but if it was only a function of being end grain oriented then flat and edge grain cutting boards likely wouldn't be any better than plastic, yet they are.

    John

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •