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Thread: Moving, mini split question

  1. #1
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    Moving, mini split question

    I'm moving in a month, and would like to take my mini split with me.

    Anyone have any experience doing this? Things I need to be aware of? I'm assuming this is a worthwhile project as I'm going to need one in my next shop, but if this is a fool's errand.....

  2. #2
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    It is complicated and takes special equipment including a recovery machine, if you intend to do it by the book.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  3. #3
    Note if you are selling the property with the mini split, it would be standard practice that the mini split is included with the sale of the property and not something that is supposed to be moved. Like everything, this is negotiable, but if you just did it, the buyers could require it be replaced or other compensation for this now removed item.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Wedel View Post
    Note if you are selling the property with the mini split, it would be standard practice that the mini split is included with the sale of the property and not something that is supposed to be moved. Like everything, this is negotiable, but if you just did it, the buyers could require it be replaced or other compensation for this now removed item.
    Thats a good note from Mark. I sure would not be hasty with the decision to move a mini-split. Do some cost analysis. I think you will find leaving your old one to add value to the current shop will go a long way towards the expense of buying a new one for the new location. There is also considerable risk of damaging your equipment and parts.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  5. #5
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    Not concerned about what constitutes a fixture for purposes of property law.

    Rather, I'm looking for if anyone has any practical experience moving a mini split.

  6. #6
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    It can be done. I looked into it, actually, but ultimately chose not to for the reason Mark mentioned. Dealing with the lineset is the key and that requires professional help or proper knowledge and tools for refrigerant recovery. Other than that its very easy.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Thanks Jim. Appreciate the insight

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Mac View Post
    Not concerned about what constitutes a fixture for purposes of property law.

    Rather, I'm looking for if anyone has any practical experience moving a mini split.
    I have installed mini splits but have yet to service one. They are critically charged and are very fussy. Here is a brief overview for old school central air or heat pump: Connect your gauges, recovery machine, and scale, close the high pressure side of your service valve or valves, bypass the run circuitry to your condensing unit, run the compressor by manually engaging the relay with only the suction side of the service valves open, release the run relay just before any damage to the compressor occurs, close the suction side of the service valve or valves, evacuate your line-set or line sets and evaporators into the recovery tank, record the weight of material removed, (a mix of oil and refrigerant), remove the line-sets, relocate the equipment, re-install the line-sets, add a filter dryer, if silver soldering is required be sure to solder only in an inert environment, add the correct amount of oil, connect your gauges, and vacuum pump, leak test, evacuate lines to a deep vacuum, connect refrigerant and scale, add refrigerant, open service valves, calculate your superheat and sub-cooling, charge with refrigerant to specified super-heat and sub-cooling data.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 11-27-2023 at 7:45 AM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  9. #9
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    I have installed quite a few mini-splits. As they say, removal is the opposite of install. To follow the rule you have someone come out to recover the refrigerant or you break the rule and discharge. Not good. I would cut the line set and crimp it outside the factory fittings. You can’t pull the line set as it work hardens and you won’t be able to save it. The way to work on the interior unit is to rotate the bottom off the wall so you can geet to the line-set to cut. Once free and elec disconnected you can lift it off the wall and remove the mounting bracket. Out side unit is simple. Once it is all in the back of the truck you have a unit open to atmosphere and you absolutely have to run a nitrogen charge to clean it up. It is possible that your unit can recovery its own refrigerant back to the condensing unit. Check that out. Once youy get the unit re-installed with the new line-set etc you have to have a ticket to handle/buy the refrigerant and a complete set of tools to evacuate can charge th unit. The Tube is your friend. Be aware that some manuf will not give warranty coverage on a moved unit.
    I am a big fan of mini-splits and have a lot of experience with them. All that tells me it is not worth doing. If that unit is operating properly in its current location I’d suggest getting what value you can from the sale and moving on clean. You might be able to thread the needle here and get everything right, but what if something goes wrong with the unit and you have to get into it or hire out repairs. Having moved this year myself I can say it is a LOT. You will have a lot on your plate and having that old mini-split to deal with? I think you will regret doing it.

  10. #10
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    Depending on what it is. Did you install precharged refrigerant piping. These have valves in the connections that keep the charge in,(close the valves on the equipment and remove the piping you will get little more than a burp of refrigerant loss). The majority of lines are not this way though so you would need to pay someone to recover the charge (residentially probably $250) and then once its reinstalled you will have to pay to evac/recharge. The fine if caught releasing a charge to the atmosphere is $25,000 at least it was the last time I checked 10 years ago.

    500-600 is defnitely cheaper than buying a new split but if your property goes up in value for it it may be a wash

  11. #11
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    If you have to ask, especially here, you will need a pro.

  12. #12
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    It is possible (anything is possible), and although I have not 'moved' one I have split and replaced a condenser (basically the same steps). The specialty part is dealing with refrigerant charge. I happen to have inert gas supply, vacuum pump, and gauges ... all part of what made it possible (and a background in cryogenic refrigeration engineering). I kept with the swage fittings on one and brazed another.

    Hurdles you will need to consider: It is illegal to discharge refrigerant into the atmosphere. You may need a license to purchase refrigerant (and the cost of refrigerant is skyrocketing). If you do not get the right amount of refrigerant or oil, it may impact performance/reliability. Leaks are often the cause of system failure - critical to get fittings or brazing right (whichever you choose - it is not 'solder').

    Some of these systems are quite good value especially considering they come precharged, it might not be 'much' more to purchase a new one.

  13. #13
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    Thanks everyone for the advice. I'm definitely getting a "the juice isn't worth the squeeze" kind of vibe. Seemed like a good idea, but that's why I asked. I will just get a new one

  14. #14
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    Good choice.

  15. #15
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    Good for you. Aside from the question of how to handle the refrigerant there is also the hole in the wall that would be left.

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