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Thread: Jobsite jointer

  1. #1

    Jobsite jointer

    Perhaps foolishly, I decided that I should have this for a project that has a bunch of oddball trim coming up.
    The older Makita planer came from ebay, 'tho they show up on Craigslist as well. It has a stout fence, but I ended up mounting it sideways, so the fence functions as a guard. It is designed to sit on sawhorses, with the chips ejecting down into a trash can. The tool drops into place with no fasteners and can easily be used normally as well. Have only done test cuts so far, which are excellent. The push block is rabbeted to hold the stock down as well as against the fence, & has sandpaper grip. If it proves itself, I'll add plastic laminate to the table. Plywood, Alaskan cedar, poplar, white oak, pine, Chinquapin.

    IMG_4612.jpgIMG_4613.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Mid West and North East USA
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    Thats clever. You will be able to edge small pieces that wound be scary to do without a vise.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
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    That is pretty cleaver.
    Kinda reminds me of shooting board setup that Iíve used in the past. Yours is the motorized version.
    How do the blades work in it. 2 or 3 indexes with pins?
    Good Luck
    Aj

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    274
    Cameron, would you mind telling me what you paid for that planer, because I have one I’ve been wanting to sell. In my ‘package’ I have both fences, four sets of knives plus a couple other things. Thanks
    Don't let it bring you down,
    It's only castles burning,
    Just find someone who's turning,
    And you will come around

    Neil Young (with a little bit of emphasis added by me)

    Board member, Gulf Coast Woodturners Association

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Mooney View Post
    Cameron, would you mind telling me what you paid for that planer, because I have one I’ve been wanting to sell. In my ‘package’ I have both fences, four sets of knives plus a couple other things. Thanks
    $125 plus shipping, tax= $158. Fences, spare knives with big nick, very beat up box.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    8,930
    I don't know about that model, but the later 3-1/4" and 6-3/4" ones have plastic gauges to set the knives by. Two knives per. Don't lose the gauge. I keep a 9mm T wrench in the toolboxes with the planers and it's just a couple of minute job to swap the knives out.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/35489506841...xoCNGoQAvD_BwE
    Last edited by Tom M King; 12-01-2023 at 10:57 AM.

  7. #7
    The tool came with all the goodies- knife setting jig, sharpening jig, spare knives, spare bolts to hold the knives on, wrench, but the metal case was very beat up.

    I've used it on the job now for exterior 2x casing ripped from assorted 2x stock. It worked great, one or two passes for a pretty much perfect edge. The chip chute needs a little work, as expected.

    I clamped it to the jobsite saw, so the chips eject through the hole for a router, and mostly into a garbage can, but they are very fine and float some.

  8. #8
    So far exceeding expectations. Possibly an auxiliary table to spread the wear on the knives. Cut off pill bottle to refine the chip ejection.

    IMG_4651.jpgIMG_4652.jpg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    5
    Very clever. I bought that planer in the 80ís and still use it. I guess Iíll have to try and copy you.

    how long is your bed?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Lorenzo Geib View Post
    Very clever. I bought that planer in the 80’s and still use it. I guess I’ll have to try and copy you.

    how long is your bed?

    The whole thing is about 4' long, with the infeed and outfeed fences roughly the same length as the tool.

    It's been working great, with the main limitation that just one section of the knives get the wear. I may just add a second layer to the table to use a different part of the knives when needed.

    When not in use, the tool goes back in it's case, and the table is somewhat big, but not too delicate.

  11. #11
    "The tool drops into place with no fasteners "

    That's amazing it can do that with the precision required to joint well. How does it do that? ....very sweet.

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