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Thread: What do you use to remove PVA squeeze out?

  1. #16
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Mickley View Post
    I flatten the face of a panel or table after glue up, so that glue gets planed away in the process.
    Iíve only barely planed the boards to take slight cup out and show grain so planing yet to do. The glue wonít damage the plane blade? I also have one of those LV flushing chisels.

  2. #17
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    I use a dull chisel like Jim when the glue is still rubbery. If can't get to it at the right time and it hardens I usually hit it lightly with my 2 inch belt sander. I generally leave glue ups overnight so the bottom will have hard glue. I generally do large glue ups by initially making 16 in wide ones before putting it all together since that is the width of my jointer and wide belt sander. It could be that the hard glue won't damage the knives but I feel better knocking it down with a sander first.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Harris View Post
    Wet rag, before the glue dries. That's the best option, though not always an option. After that, I'll use a hand plane, chisel, card scraper, whatever. It largely depends on how much glue I have to remove, how easy it is to access, and what else needs to be done. Though the quicker you can remove it the easier it is to remove. If you can get to it while it's still gummy, it's a lot less of a hassle to remove.

    Typically, it's not a problem. The only time I've had problems is when getting dried glue out of the ends of miter joints. And then, it's either a case of being careful or backing the miter joint with a block of scrap, like you might with planning end grain for support.
    Not the best option in my opinion. You can spread the glue around into wood pores with that wet rag, plus introduce even more water to the wood that requires more drying time. Surface it too soon, and the wood will shrink at the joint as well as the glue line itself. I let the glue dry for about 10 minutes and with a sharp chisel I run it down the squeeze out and the entire line of glue comes off with no effort.

  4. #19
    To remove hardened PVA glue squeeze-out from a tabletop, you can use a sharp chisel or card scraper. Be careful not to dig into the wood, and work slowly to avoid damaging the surface. For thick areas of glue, you may need to soften it with a damp cloth before scraping it off.

  5. #20
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    There's close to zero chance that glue is going to damage your plane blade. The flushing chisel is for fine work but can certainly be used to clean up glue if you wish.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wilkins View Post
    Iíve only barely planed the boards to take slight cup out and show grain so planing yet to do. The glue wonít damage the plane blade? I also have one of those LV flushing chisels.

  6. #21
    I'll pile on with the rest here. The best route is to clean most of it while wet and only leave the minimum squeeze out to deal with dry.

    While still wet, I use a scrap of paper towel and a sharpened scrap of wood and a little water to remove the squeeze out. The key thing here is working clean, so you don't leave smudges. So wipe a bit and throw away. The little sharpened scrap of wood helps to be precise.

    Dry squeeze out is more tricky, because yanking it off can create some ugly tearout. If it is an important area on a show face, I'll use a little scrap of stainless steel shim stock to protect the wood while I sand or grind the glue blobs down to just barely proud - say 0.010" thick shim and leave the same thickness of dried glue squeeze above the wood. I then move to a freshly sharpened 90-degree bevel chisel with rounded corners. It works sort of like a card scraper to whittle down the lumps and has a lot less risk of yanking chunks of wood out than a regular chisel. A hard scraper also works well here.
    Last edited by John C Cox; 11-22-2023 at 1:12 PM.

  7. #22
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    Sometimes tape is a good answer

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Sometimes tape is a good answer
    How do you mean?

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wilkins View Post
    still trying to find that balance. Already used it on just one side.
    It isn't hard to do, grab some scrap timber and start experimenting and notice how less glue removes the floating that causes misalignment. Then break apart all the pieces you glued and see how the different pieces adhered to each other.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

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